Base Camp Bonn Youth Hostel Hosts Thematically Redesigned Caravans

Base Camp Bonn Base Camp Bonn 6 Base Camp Bonn youth hostel

German hotel owner Michael Bonner has transformed a 600 square meter vacant warehouse into Base Camp Bonn Youth Hostel, an indoor landscape of 15 refurbished and themed caravans. Each caravan’s space is uniquely detailed and designed to reflect a particular era or theme, such as the “Hausboot,” “Flower Power,” and “Big Ben.” The hostel also plays host to two U.S. airstreams and two German railway cars that can accommodate small groups. This concept creates a charming community space for guests from all over the country. Prices vary per size and sleeping capacity, but start at EUR 54 per night. (via design boom)

Stephanie Herr’s Topographic Sculptures

Stephanie Herr is a German artist whose topographic sculptures speak to humanity’s interaction with the natural world and dissociation thereof. Painstakingly cut by hand, her mapping of sausage  and chicken breasts in styrofoam reference our pursuit of complete knowledge and control of the world at large, charmingly jabbing its warped products through her topographic style. This isn’t to say her works are merely didactic condemnations of mankind’s imperialism, her work is as critical of it as it is inspired by its imagination and absurdity. Political or not, Kerr’s work is a real pleasure to look at. (via)

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Video Watch: Lorenz Potthast’s Real Time Slow Motion Helmet

 

German artist Lorenz Potthast  recently developed a helmet that turns the world around you into slow motion. While we still can’t quite control reality enough to actually slow the passage of time, Potthast’s helment which lets us control our perception of it is as good as we’ve got right now. Not only does it, as the video says, make the wearer aware of the time they occupy, but it makes them interact with the image world as it relates to time, which is amazing. The christmas these begin appearing under trees will be the beginning of the future we have been waiting for. Watch a video of the helmet in action after the jump. (via)

Bert Löeschner’s Lawn Chair Art

Bert Löeschner among the artists with the spirit of animators who anthropomorphically instill life in the objects they choose. His object of choice is the ever-present and thereby invisible lawn chair. Löschner uses them to make charming characters and sculptures of equally ubiquitous objects– lovers, vagabonds, pedestrians, swingsets, etc. Next time you’re bored or down, just anthropomorphize the objects and plants around you and the world will be a much friendlier place. (via)

Annika Frye’s Experimental Design

Annika Frye is a young German designer making objects that are partly useful but mostly experiment. That modern cliché of “everything has been done”, or in this case, made, can be discouraging to some young artists and designers. But not everybody. Some people find in it a freedom– now that the difficult groundwork has been done, it is time to play. Annika is definitely in the latter group. Her designs are mostly about in what ways we can re-create the things we already have but in the wildest, most unconventional, and cheapest ways possible. Everything she does is at an angle– a table, made out of tape; a chair, that’s half blanket; a seat, that unfolds into a bed. Check out more of her designs and her descriptions thereof after the jump!

Throwable Panoramic Ball Camera

Young German engineer Jonas Pfeil recently developed the throwable panoramic ball camera which, as the name implies, is a ball which is programmed to take a complete panorama when it reaches the apex of its toss, with the thirty six (36) cell phone cameras implanted into its body. However, like most exciting ideas the camera-ball isn’t available for sale and looking for sponsors. If you have an enormous inheritance you’re sitting on and don’t know what do with, back Jonas’ camera ball so we can all see the world from new angles! ( via )

Claire Morgan’s Crazy Installations Use Weird Materials Like Taxidermy and Dandelion Seeds

 

…My attention has been drawn to the cheap distractions we choose to place in our immediate vicinity, with which to screen us from the overwhelming facts: that we are nothing; that our only certainty as individuals is a life, of unspecified duration, and then a death.

Seeing some crazy output from London-based artist Claire Morgon. Using a lot of unusual materials, she’s put together some really huge (both in scale and technique) installations. Dandelion seeds? Taxidermy? Yes please.

But to get the full Morgan effect, you have to click to her website. She’s got some awesome works on paper too. And if you’re anywhere near Cologne, Germany, head over to Galerie Karsten Greve, where the artist is currently showing a new batch of work. (via)

Martin Heuwold Turns a Bridge in Germany into a Giant Lego Installation

 

Martin Heuwold (aka MEGX) of Wuppertal, Germany makes public art installations and murals. Heuwold created “Lego-Brücke”, or “Lego Bridge”- literally a functional bridge in Wuppertal made to look like giant lego blocks. The piece took 4 weeks to complete. It’s funny how really simple ideas like “Lego Bridge” actually have a really huge impact on our public spaces. Life becomes a little more pleasant when people take ownership of their daily environments and build stronger connections to their cities. All it takes is just a small, personal interest.