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As an arts blogger I spend most of my day looking at amazing things created by artists, performers and creatives. If you’re reading
Beautiful/Decay, a good portion of your time is likely also spent in awe of the creative output of others. I decided to make a move to the other side of the screen, rolled up my sleeves and learned to create something awesome. I joined forces with Skillshare, an online learning community that provides access to over 15,000 creative classes, to help accelerate my creative inspiration. Whether you’re looking to learn graphic design, illustration, photography or practically anything else, Skillshare can teach you what you need to know to execute your vision. Even better, they’re offering Beautiful/Decay readers two free months of Skillshare Premium (usually it’s $10 per month). Visit this link to redeem the promo or use the promo code BEAUTIFULDECAY..

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.design, The Ultimate Domain Extension For Creatives

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The new .design domain is popping up everywhere, in just under 2 years it has been registered by more than 60k individuals worldwide with major brands on board as well, just see facebook.design, airbnb.design, npr.design, kohler.design, telekom.design, booking.design.

The .design extension functions in the same way a .com or .net does. However, anyone that has ever registered a domain knows that the short and good .com domains were snatched up decades ago. So, instead of settling for a clunky name, you can now stick out with something both elegant and innovative. You can often shorten or improve your existing branding by switching to .design; you can set up a fun coordinating email address (holler@yourname.design); or you can even use it as a clever redirect to another site, like a behance profile.

.design is being used across the varied design disciplines and so it is creating a growing and diffuse online community of creatives. UX and web designers are the fastest adopters but there is really strong representation of more niche fields like lighting design as well.

We.design is now offering $5 .design names to Beautiful/Decay readers, and every domain comes with free WHOIS privacy as well as SSL certificates. While .design can cost up to $70 at some registrars, next year’s renewal will only cost $35. Use code BEAUTIFUL to take advantage now.

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A Temple Of Love Built Out Of Neon Colors, Geometric Patterns And Bold Typography

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If the Beatles were right and all you need is love, I’ll take Morag Myerscough and Luke Morgan’s version thank you very much. Built for the Festival of Love held in Southbank Centre, London (June 28 – August 31, 2014), The Temple of Agape is a visual feast. Neon colors, geometric patterns, and bold typography combine to make love a vibrant, exciting place to be.

The structures are inspired by those encountered by Myerscough in India and elsewhere in Asia where bamboo is used extensively for scaffolding as well as the Watts Towers in LA. The vibrant colours and handpainted lettering are similarly inspired.

Much of the success of the design is due to the restraint shown by Myerscough and Morgan, which may seem counterintuitive when looking at the riotous structure. Look closer, though, and you’ll see that there is one typeface and one type treatment. The color palette is strictly controlled, a neon rainbow, plus pink, black, and white. All of the shapes are simple and geometric; even the counters of the letters are removed, streamlining the shapes of the letters. Minimizing the design elements allows the installation to be ebullient but not overwhelming.

The Festival celebrates the legalization of Same Sex Couple Act by choosing seven Greek words describing love. Myerscough and Morgan’s were given Agape, a spiritual, selfless love; the love of humanity. Their temple represents the power of love to conquer hate.

“The Temple stands proud like a peacock with its giant Martin Luther King quote, expressing the power of love to the world,” say Myerscough and Morgan. “Inside its heart is calm and dappled with light for contemplating complex emotions, a place that can transform with Love expressed within.”

This is a temporary construction, which is a shame. The world could use more love, especially when it’s executed so beautifully. (Via Creative Review) Photos by Gareth Gardner.

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Anna Marinenko Matches Sound Waves With Their Environmental Manifestations

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Merging sound and landscape, Ukrainian architect and designer Anna Marinenko has created a series of images – called “Nature Sound Form Wave” – that presents juxtapositions of sound waves alongside panoramas of sky, water, mountain, and tree lines. Marinenko’s pairings demonstrate the synchronicity and parallels to be found in different patterns among natural and manufactured designs, the similarity between the forms remarkably uncanny. Because Marinenko meticulously lines up the designs and maintains the same color palette throughout the images, ocean waves, flight paths, and landscapes appear to be transforming into the sound waves, the transition nearly seamless. (via design boom)

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Calamityware Combines Delicate Porcelain And Monster Attacks

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Made popular by the dinnerware imported by England from China during the 18th century, Willow pattern is a distinctive and delicate pattern. And probably the last place you would expect to see alien invasions, giant robots attacking cities and pterodactyls. Graphic designer and draughtsman Don Moyer started with a fairly basic premise, “I love to draw. The drawings I like best are those that make me laugh. Several years ago, I started drawing Calamityware —traditional willow-pattern dinner plates with a tranquil scene threatened by impending calamity.” Funded by a successful Kickstarter to realize his whimsical drawings into actual dinnerware, Moyer has realized his dream of correcting an ancient problem, that “too many plates have been too boring for too long.”If it all seems light-hearted, it really is. Moyer’s drawings retain the traditional line quality and palette of their inspiration, but add in sinking ships, flying monkeys, and villages on fire. These drawings are then transferred to blank plates and fired to set the illustrations. Definitely beats your grandmother’s antique china if laughter is what you are after.  (via mymodernmet)

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Andy Warhol’s Groundbreaking Computer Art Recovered

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Digitally created visuals are so ubiquitous today, from commercial applications to advertising to contemporary art, that it is hard to remember a time when it was a rudimentary technology used only be a few specialists. Commodore’s “Amiga 1000” changed this, bringing image creation programs into the home, allowing anyone to create original and edited computer images for the first time. To promote the public launch of their groundbreaking model, Commodore asked Andy Warhol to create an image using the software, demonstrating the accessibility of the program, and the possibilities in the hands of a pioneering visual artist. Seen in the following clip of Warhol “painting” Blondie singer Debbie Harry in 1985, it was assumed that Warhol only used the program once, his digital experiment being forgotten. 

It may have stayed that way had it not been for the curiosity and effort of another pioneering artist, Cory Arcangel. Well-known for his early hacked video games and glitched aesthetic that came to be known as Net Art (or Post-Conceptualism), Arcangel was curious if the Prince of Pop Art created any other works on the early digital format. This search led to conversations with curators at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, who owned most of the equipment (discs, hard drives and floppies) that might contain these experiments. Connecting Arcangel to the nearby Carnegie Melon University’s computing club, who have experience in recovery and “retrocomputing”, the combined effort to recover Warhol’s files took three years.

In a more tech-savvy description of the difficult process at Wired.com, Liz Stinson notes, “Because of the disks’ age and fragility, extracting data posed a serious risk. The archiving and viewing process could irreversibly damage the content, but letting the disks slowly degrade was an even worse option.”

The team was eventually able to recover eighteen images (some of which are shown above), among the first digitally made images by an already famous visual artist. Describing the astoundingly original files, Arcangel said, “What’s amazing is that by looking at these images, we can see how quickly Warhol seemed to intuit the essence of what it meant to express oneself, in what then was a brand-new medium: the digital.”

A documentary about the recovery, Trapped: Andy Warhol’s Amiga Experiments, will premiere May 10th at Carnegie Mellon (and will then be viewable at http://nowseethis.org/.), after which many more of the images will probably be released to the public for the first time ever. (via wired)

 

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Mario Zoots’ Modernly Surreal Collages

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Collage inherently involves nothing less than altering existence. By taking found imagery, Mario Zoots makes changes both hand-made and (occasionally) digital to alter the perception of the everyday, and continue their evolution towards new definitions. The Denver, Colorado-based Zoots is on the forefront of the modern collage movement, and was featured in Gestalten’s recent The Age of Collage: Contemporary Collage in Modern Artthe definitive investigation into how collage has become one the most vital forms of current visual expression. Separate from the concerns of any loosely-affiliated movement, Zoots describes his own practice from a more personal perspective, “I would like to think that my work is about tapping into the unconscious and setting up parameters to allow chance to work its magic.”

Typically focusing on the human figure, and often in portraiture genre, Zoots utilizes geometric pattern, layers, and physical manipulations like scratches, drips, and tears to obscure, thereby creating new faces to interpret. In an interview with Monster Children, Zoots describes his attention and focus on the face of his subject, “It’s really about the eyes for me. When I disrupt someone’s gaze, I find some mysterious, surreal quality. It makes you forget who you’re looking at. I try to create collages from dreams. When I dream I know who the people are, but I usually can’t see their faces. There’s a real energy behind that.”

Mario Zoots will take part in the upcoming travelling exhibition INTERNATIONAL WEIRD COLLAGE SHOW (IWCS) at The Invisible Dog in Brooklyn, New York. The 8th Edition of the IWCS opens Saturday April 19, 2014, from 6 to 10pm, and runs through May 11th, 2014. 

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Whimsical Bussiness Cards Of Your Favorite Pop Culture Hero’s And Villains

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Business cards exist as a tangible resource and advertisment for offering one’s trade. Benedetto Papi and Edoardo Satamato of Italian creative agency Invasiona Creativa began to wonder: what jobs would pop culture characters have, and how would their cards look?

Beginning with the idea that these characters (ranging from science fiction to comedy to horror and action films) lost their jobs, how would they rebrand? Although most of the results involve wordplay over any serious retelling of the character’s myth, the results are playful and fun, which seems to be the duo’s motivation.

On their website, the group declares, “A different approach compared to canonical style of advertising agencies: a NERD APPROACH…We will do everything to…give new life to mundane communications, to re-invent social campaigns completely useless, to regain lost contact with the consumer, to open new horizons in the world of apps…” (via mymodernmet)

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