Sonia Rentsch’s Still Life Portraits Of Organic Weaponry

Sonia Rentsch - organic objects Sonia Rentsch - organic objects Sonia Rentsch - organic objects Sonia Rentsch - organic objects

Sonia Rentsch is an art director and still life artist from Melbourne. From intricately arranged appetizers to a hanging lamp fashioned out of a head of lettuce, Rentsch’s work is both dynamic and elegant, often incorporating food as a subject. This trend is put to most effective use in her series Harm Less, an installation in which Rentsch fashioned weaponry out of completely organic objects. Each piece is visually arresting, the imagery of handguns and bullets hauntingly familiar and yet transformed into something beautiful when created out of green produce and plants. The series, in which handguns are made out of everything from bamboo shoots to roses, presents a powerful statement about gun violence and its impact as well as Rentsch’s impeccable eye for detail.

Rentsch has worked with photographer Scott Newett, assisted with design duo Tin and Ed, and worked as the production designer for Australian popstar Kimbra’s music video for “Good Intent”. Her work is consistently bright and colorful, but always proffers a lens through which viewers can fully immerse themselves in the elaborate scenery. One of her most recent projects, a public installation with artist Ben Davis, included a garden of colored pinwheels displayed in Melbourne’s La Trobe Place. Although the meticulous design behind Rentsch’s still life images is evident in each minute detail, Rentsch is assured in working with no set process. As she said in an interview, “An idea comes as quickly as it has to.”

Read More >


Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

An-Sophie Kesteleyn’s Photographs Of Young Children And Their Guns

an-sofie-kesteleyn_07an-sofie-kesteleyn_06an-sofie-kesteleyn_0207_4

Since the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School and other tragic massacres, gun ownership and Second Amendment rights have been a site of intense controversy; on both sides of the debate, fear is a driving force, with one side arguing that guns provide protection and the other asserting that firearms cause more deaths and injuries.

How do guns factor into the lives of younger generations, born during this period of political strife? The photographer An-Sophie Kesteleyn adds to the dialogue with My First Rifle, a series of portraits of children bearing Crikett rifles, a firearm designed for children with a smaller scale and a variety of color choices. Beside each image, Kesteleyn places a torn, school-lined notebook page, onto which her subjects write their deepest fears.

Many of the .22 caliber rifles look like colorful toys; shot atop their small beds and beside Disney princess merchandise, the children appear as though caught by adults in a game of make-believe. They position their guns across their bodies in a protective manner, shielding themselves and their cozy bedrooms from the lens. The rooms, neatly ordered, maintain a certain innocence that is at times irreconcilable with the notion of a weapon intended to wound or kill.

Furthering this thread of childlike naiveté are the children’s drawings depicting their fears; these scrawling notes, touchingly misspelled, often assign terror to fictitious or extinct creatures: zombies, werewolves, dinosaurs. In this way, the artist incorporates the weapons into an elaborate realm of youthful nightmares. Depending on the viewer, this choice could either implicate NRA activists as infantile conspiracy theorists, or it could paint the world as a dangerous place wherein weaponry is necessary. What do you think? (via Feature Shoot)
Read More >


Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

South African’s Beaded Weaponry Series Addresses International Arms Trade

zimanphotographyzimanphotography4 zimanphotography2 zimanphotography7

Haunting and provocative, “Ghosts” South African artist Ralph Ziman’s recent photography exhibition addresses the international arms trade. The series features 200 beaded gun and ammunition sculptures created by 6 Zimbabwean artisans who were commissioned by Ziman. The sculptures are made from traditional African beads and wire and are replicas of AK-47s and general purpose machine guns (GPMGs). The artists are also the subjects of Ziman’s photographs, alongside some construction workers, and a member of the South African Police Services who just wanted his picture taken. The idea for the project began as a series of murals in Venice that were a response to the international arms trade and Africa. The result is a powerful representation of the intimate relationship between Africa and arms trading.

“In bringing his exhibit to the US, ‘the world’s biggest arms exporter,’ Ziman goes some way to redirecting the one directional flow of the arms trade, inviting viewers to consider the original source of the guns on display.” “Ghosts” features the gun sculptures, installations, and photographs, and is on display from February 8 through March 2 at C.A.V.E. Gallery in Los Angeles. (via hi fructose and okay africa)

Read More >


Currently Trending

Hand Painted Weaponry Dishware By Trevor Jackson

Trevor Jackson sculpture3

Trevor Jackson sculpture2

Trevor Jackson sculpture7

Trevor Jackson‘s ceramic work is deceptively innocent.  Hand painted in blue, hidden behind animals, flowers, and flourishes are deadly weapons.  His work are definitely conversation pieces for an especially hot topic.  While his intentions with the pieces aren’t entirely obvious, the series is clearly political.  Typically utilitarian weapons are presented as garishly decorated and entirely harmless.  Dishware that is often passed down from generation to generation is stylized with politically intense imagery.

Read More >


Currently Trending

Houses of Worship Built With Weapons And Ammunition

Al Farrow sculpture3 Al Farrow sculpture5

The stark sculptures of Al Farrow are jolting in their simplicity.  His Reliquaries series of sculptures are houses of worship and reliquaries (a container for holy relics) built from weapons and ammunition.  Stacks of bullets form walls, barrels form steeples, and muzzles form minarets.  Farrow’s artistic commentary on violence in connection with religion is a powerful one.  Using a provocative medium to create loaded imagery (seriously, pun not intended), Farrow’s work easily elicits strong responses from viewers.

Read More >


Currently Trending

Asif Farooq’s Cardboard Guns

Miami based artist Asif Farooq builds highly detailed replicas of guns using only found cardboard, an X-Acto Knife, and glue.  The weapons are build to mimic their real life counterparts in both detail and size.  Farooq constructed 300 of these cardboard replicas in order to create an entire “gun shop”.  The atmosphere of danger that surrounds the weapons is contrasted by the nature of his medium.  His sculpture not only encourage viewers to confront a fear of the weapons but to also contemplate that fear.  Farooq’s work is especially relevant in the midst of recent gun-control debates.

Read More >


Currently Trending