The Wearable Art Of Norihito Hatanaka Looks Good Enough To Eat

Norihito Hatanaka - Fake FoodNorihito Hatanaka - Fake FoodNorihito Hatanaka - Fake Food

Are you hungry for weird, hyper-realistic art? Look no further, the highly unique, wearable art by Japanese artist Norihito Hatanaka will satisfy your taste. Of course, not literally, as the “jewelry” this artist makes only resembles food. Hatanaka is not your typical artist, he is a fake food artist, creating wearable art ranging from bracelets, necklaces, and earrings made to look exactly like different kinds of foods. His bacon bracelets with earrings to match appear to still be sizzling, and his fruit necklace seems to be dripping with juices. The artist explains that in Japanese culture, food aesthetics are extremely important, making Japan a hot spot for impeccable fake-food skill.

How and where would a person learn how to create such a wide variety of fake foods so perfectly, you might ask? Well, Hatanaka is just following the family business. He took over his father’s business of a factory that creates fake food, models to display in restaurants. Having been interested in art as a student, Hatanaka has taken inspiration from this business and crossed over into the art world, bringing it a new flavor. Learning this fake food craft at his factory, he now sketches his appetizing creations and then constructs them into wonderfully gaudy jewelry. Inspired by real life dishes, many of his pieces include a full meal, complete with peas and rice on the side. With Hatanaka’s wearable art, you could literally wear a three-course meal! Although it would take a special kind of person to pull off wearing such a statement piece, I would not be surprised to see one of Hatanaka’s unbelievably crafted pieces worn on the runaway. (via The Creators Project)

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Contemporary Paintings Of Women, Occasionally Nude, Sometimes With Food

Megan Van Groll - PaintingMegan Van Groll - Painting

Megan Van Groll - Painting

Megan Van Groll paints women– mediating on the fine line between nakedness and nudity, or how these two concepts relate to freedom or identity. Likewise, from bathing in cocoa puffs to sensually brawling at a donut shop, her food motif is an interesting one, often working in tandem with the female form– provoking thoughts of fetish from the outside, but also, a much more personal and complicated binging ceremony.

Of her own craft, Groll states, “My narrative portraits of women are, at their core, a painted attempt to understand and portray how modern women create identity and meaning from the world around them. I am interested in exploring the way we perform our projected ideal personas, for ourselves and for others.”

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