Pia Bramley’s Ink Wash Drawings

Pia Bramley uses ink wash to make impressionist drawings that are marvelous embodiments of the word Dreamy. But unlike surrealist artists, who consciously try to render a dreamscape and thereby make us think more about the idea of said painting being an interesting dream, Pia’s just make you feel like you’re dreaming when you look at her work. Which we could probably all agree is a real treat. If they look familiar, you might have seen them in the New York Times or on plates from Anthropologie.

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Neon Animal X-Ray Remixes from Wonman Kim

 

Interesting digital illustration from Korean artist/designer Wonman Kim. In these works, animal anatomy is mixed and matched with random, miscellaneous items in compositions that look like neon projections of x-ray scans. You could spend a long time playing a game of “I Spy” with each one. The artist also does some great vinyl toy design as well, which you can find through his site. See more after of the x-ray pieces after the jump. (via)

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Molly Segal’s Brutal Brush Strokes Of Vulnerable Moments

Brutal, arresting, and violent, Molly Segal’s large format watercolors of hungry, rabid pack animals serve as symbols of both watchers of and participants within pernicious social situations; these scenarios, coupled with paintings of messy, passionate, unleashed sexuality are all depicted using loose, uncontrolled brush strokes, that often leave dripping paint behind. Her watercolors are made on a waterproof paper called Yupo, so before she even beings her process, she has initiated a battle between contradicting mediums. In her statement, she describes how this impacts her work:

“The loose, wet on wet technique of watercolor on Yupo paper helps me explore the ambiguities of our own boundaries. Because Yupo paper doesn’t absorb any of the paint all of the pigment sits on top, vulnerable to the elements and impermanent. The impermanence and vulnerability of the paint itself references the fleetingness of youth and the fluctuating nature of memory.”

Molly Segal is originally from Oakland and is currently an MFA candidate at The School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

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Molly Segal’s Brutal Brush Strokes Of Vulnerable Moments

Brutal, arresting, and violent, Molly Segal’s large format watercolors of hungry, rabid pack animals serve as symbols of both watchers of and participants within pernicious social situations; these scenarios, coupled with paintings of messy, passionate, unleashed sexuality are all depicted using loose, uncontrolled brush strokes, that often leave dripping paint behind. Her watercolors are made on a waterproof paper called Yupo, so before she even beings her process, she has initiated a battle between contradicting mediums. In her statement, she describes how this impacts her work:

“The loose, wet on wet technique of watercolor on Yupo paper helps me explore the ambiguities of our own boundaries. Because Yupo paper doesn’t absorb any of the paint all of the pigment sits on top, vulnerable to the elements and impermanent. The impermanence and vulnerability of the paint itself references the fleetingness of youth and the fluctuating nature of memory.”

Molly Segal is originally from Oakland and is currently an MFA candidate at The School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

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Stephanie Kunze and a Girl Who Dreams

 

There’s a lot to look at in Stephanie Kunze‘s illustrations. Minnesota-based Kunze draws with pencil and colors with Photoshop for an overall style that is contoured and slightly textured. The compositions are feminine and detailed and should feel busy, but the dream-like subjects still seem rested and calm. Worth a look is Kunze’s personal blog for a clearer picture into her thought and execution processes. 

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Frank Höhne’s Grungy LSD Drawings

What do you get when you combine the playfulness of a child’s drawing, the grunginess of a zine, the general awesomeness of MS Paint, and perhaps just a drop of LSD? You get the work of Berlin-based illustrator, Frank Höhne. Frank’s drawings are delightfully messy – there are endless stories woven into the varying typefaces, characters, and shapes. Even better - Gestalten just released a book on Frank this month. It was really hard to pick, but we have a few of our favorites from Frank’s endless portfolio after the jump.

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The Mystical Dreams and Mythologies of Ryan Samuel Carr

Ryan Samuel Carr is a native artist/illustrator of Ventura, California.  Ryan’s beautiful line work and dreamy figurative elements remain a constant reoccurring theme throughout his extensive body of work.  When I look at Ryan’s work, even if the subject matter is just the roots in a pile of weeds he always seems to capture a rare and very sincere moment only hinting at whatever secrets the particular root, or bed of flowers have to say.  Ryan’s unique line work evokes so much feeling and emotional manifestations.  Ryan shares a bit of his mark making process in this direct quote from the talented young artist himself:

“I think a lot about the ‘immediacy’ of drawing (with ink and pencils), and the individual mark in a moment of time; what that all says…it’s very mystical and meditative for me.”

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Jon Boam’s Muted Sci-Fi Illustration

 

Jon Boam is an illustrator living and working in the UK. He works in a nice, muted palette which he applies in flat vectors to sci-fi line work. I especially like how repetitious some of his stuff is. It looks like he doesn’t easily become bored with drawing one robot after another. And I’m definitely not bored either. The comics influence in Boam’s work is fairly evident, but not heavy handed, which is always nice to see. Now you know what your work would look like if you never stopped doodling in your 3rd grade Arithmetic notes. 

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