Eiko Ojala’s Cut-Paper Illustration

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Estonian artist Eiko Ojala expertly creates illustrations using paper.  His complex collage pieces are at the same time simple in execution.  His background as an illustrator is clear in each of these pieces.  Ojala is able to communicate a considerable story with minimal imagery and medium.  Whether a series of trees interacting through different seasons, or portraits, Ojala weaves interesting narratives using simple poignant scenes.

Windows of New York – An Illustrated Series

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I’m loving this project by Jose Guizar called “Windows of New York.” Every week, Jose walks the streets of his city streets in New York and documents the neighborhood windows. After picking out windows of interest, he takes them into illustrator and makes magic happen. In his own words: ”I’m into all kinds of visual things, sharing good stuff with great people, and apparently, staring creepily at windows.” Check out a selection of Jose’s windows after the jump, and follow along at windowsofnewyork.com

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Designer Creates a Different Silhouette of His Daughter Every Week

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Graphic Design can often get the bad rap of lacking soul or substance.  Designer Brent Holloman, however, created a series with heart.  When his daughter was born in 2012 he decided to create a new silhouette of her each week.  Ranging from illustration to sculpture, each week brings a profile of his little girl.  These are a sampling of the many pieces he created.  Holloman comments on the series:

“ With the arrival of our first baby girl there is one thing I hear all the time… “They grow up so fast.” So I decided to start a project where I can mark the stages of her growth by doing a silhouette of her each week for her first year (or as long as I can keep it going).”

Canon Call’s Disruptive Doodles

I just got back from checking out the undergrad show at UCLA Design Media Arts, and I was impressed with a lot of the work, but there was one young artist that really stood out to me: Canon Call. Call’s work is largely comprised of illustration on found materials, and the sincerely charming thing about these little disruptive doodles is their ability to build upon the image they are layered on top of in order to develop a dialogue around pop-culture and society at large. The best part of the work is the hidden irony behind the naming of each piece’s source file… each JPEG on his site is titled “dontsteal.jpg” or “dontcopythis.jpg – and various other alterations of that phrase. Genius. The work itself feels like a weird mashup of pop art and a surrealist exquisite corpse of sorts. I am very much looking forward to watching Call’s work develop.

David Sauceda’s Highly Detailed Portraits

Mexican artist David Sauceda creates highly detailed illustrations.  Primarily using ink and paper, he constructs his compositions from innumerable finely controlled lines.  His portraits pictured here, literally depict the inside and outside of a person.  The series is titled Membrane, referring to the outer body as opposed to an inner psychology.  On this idea of a membrane Sauceda states:

“This project explores the concept of identity as a membrane, intangible and invisible, outside the physical body, being the filter of information between the environment and the individual’s psychological self. The membrane is in a constant state of change and adaptability, leading to the development of an identity.” [via]

The Vivid Spots, Swirls And Girls of Andres Guzman

Andres Guzman is a Peruvian artist based in Minneapolis, Minnesota and also 1/3 of the art and music collective STEAKMOB.  He’s an artist I’m surprised we haven’t already featured before.  STEAKMOB is a loose crew of creatives who do everything from design to sounds to illustration.  They invite anyone who is their creative  to work with them in their space (an attic studio).  “We just love to make stuff for the eyes and the ears,” states Andres.  Which I think to “the T” describes Andres perfectly.  He has always been drawing and experimenting, trying out new techniques and mediums to further expand his artistic vision.
Andres is a force to be reckoned with when it comes to his sketching ability.  He never ceases to have new journal entries to share of ladies and heated Midwestern narratives, a vast portfolio of hand-drawn typography, and a keen sense of nailing portraiture.  Andres is currently working on a music video animation for Tame Impala, and working with Colonel Blimp UK.  I included more illustration samples than the usual after the jump because he has so many golden pieces on his tumblr and his other blog!  All of his portfolios are worth your time to check out and contemplate.

The Symbolic Figurative Works & Artifacts of Ching Ching Cheng

The figurative drawings and paintings of Pasadena based artist Ching Ching Cheng are remarkably captivating to me.  She uses members of her family often as subject matter but continually chooses to portray them in a conceptual way embracing different ways to illustrate a memory of that person in her past more so than the realistic representation of them.  Ching uses sculpture and installation mediums in her work, such as her vintage polaroid and mm camera sculptures made of found books & maps.  Each camera sculpture has tremendous amounts of character to them feeling to me as if they are alive beings or the “true” soul of whatever camera they are embodying.  Ching’s work is thoughtful and personal slivers of her life past and present.   Her primary influences include nature, and psychology.

The Subdimensional Hypernudes And Other Action Figures Of Jordan Speer

Illustrator, graphic designer, and artist Jordan Speer created his own action figures (or at least illustrations of them.)  Recreating the familiar packaging of childhood toys, Speer fills each one with a unique figurine.  While nearly nostalgia inducing, each toy is also slightly sinister featuring warnings such as “slightly toxic”, “forbidden”, and “highly illegal”.  Speer’s figures are enigmatic characters, unfamiliar and unwilling to reveal much beyond their name and accessories.  Which would you collect?