Allison Healy’s Intricate Watercolor Illustrations

I am an avid admirer of Allison Healy‘s illustrations.  She is an illustrator based out of Boston, Mass.  Her work strikes me as the colors are rich and vibrant possibly implying   digital coloring but I know for a fact she uses watercolor and only watercolor.  I find this refreshing in the mass digital illustration age.  Check more of her intricate works out after the jump.

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Lizzy Stewart’s Charming Folk Art Inspired Illustrations

Lizzy Stewart is a British illustrator who makes incredibly charming images. Inspired by Eastern European folk art and medieval painting, her drawings are wonderfully flat and full of simple shapes. Her work reminds me of some of her contemporaries like Pia Bramley and Carson Ellis, all of whom practically force a better mood on their viewer. Aside from her drawing and painting, Stewart makes graphic novel-style books as well. A lot of her stuff is available for sale in the store on her website too, so if you haven’t donated all your extra dough to the Red Cross’ Sandy recovery efforts, you can do some one stop christmas shopping and support a young burgeoning artist all in one foul swoop! (via)

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Mike Perry’s Shapes and Colors

Mike Perry is of the artist/illustrator/designer/art director/teacher/typographer/zine-maker breed who have put all their energy into making a living off of creativity. Taking inspiration from Steven Harrington (an LA contemporary), cartoons, and mid century ad copy, Perry’s work is all about enjoying life and encouraging others to live more creatively à la Sister Corita. He has a show up right now until November 20 in Brooklyn called Wandering Around Wondering. I use the term “show” loosely, Because keeping in the spirit of 100% outward-directed positivity,  it’s equal parts original work, workshops, and open community events, all of which are free. His press release describes it pretty well:

“Wandering Around Wondering is a free three-month community exhibition and series of events that will coincide with the launch of my monograph, published by Rizzoli. The event space will host workshops, screenings, gatherings, open discussions, and much more — conducted by me and a select group of design and illustration professionals. The space will become a dynamic environment for continuous creation, where visitors will be able to explore freely and create their own unique experiences.”

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Pia Bramley’s Ink Wash Drawings

Pia Bramley uses ink wash to make impressionist drawings that are marvelous embodiments of the word Dreamy. But unlike surrealist artists, who consciously try to render a dreamscape and thereby make us think more about the idea of said painting being an interesting dream, Pia’s just make you feel like you’re dreaming when you look at her work. Which we could probably all agree is a real treat. If they look familiar, you might have seen them in the New York Times or on plates from Anthropologie.

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Neon Animal X-Ray Remixes from Wonman Kim

 

Interesting digital illustration from Korean artist/designer Wonman Kim. In these works, animal anatomy is mixed and matched with random, miscellaneous items in compositions that look like neon projections of x-ray scans. You could spend a long time playing a game of “I Spy” with each one. The artist also does some great vinyl toy design as well, which you can find through his site. See more after of the x-ray pieces after the jump. (via)

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Molly Segal’s Brutal Brush Strokes Of Vulnerable Moments

Brutal, arresting, and violent, Molly Segal’s large format watercolors of hungry, rabid pack animals serve as symbols of both watchers of and participants within pernicious social situations; these scenarios, coupled with paintings of messy, passionate, unleashed sexuality are all depicted using loose, uncontrolled brush strokes, that often leave dripping paint behind. Her watercolors are made on a waterproof paper called Yupo, so before she even beings her process, she has initiated a battle between contradicting mediums. In her statement, she describes how this impacts her work:

“The loose, wet on wet technique of watercolor on Yupo paper helps me explore the ambiguities of our own boundaries. Because Yupo paper doesn’t absorb any of the paint all of the pigment sits on top, vulnerable to the elements and impermanent. The impermanence and vulnerability of the paint itself references the fleetingness of youth and the fluctuating nature of memory.”

Molly Segal is originally from Oakland and is currently an MFA candidate at The School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

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Molly Segal’s Brutal Brush Strokes Of Vulnerable Moments

Brutal, arresting, and violent, Molly Segal’s large format watercolors of hungry, rabid pack animals serve as symbols of both watchers of and participants within pernicious social situations; these scenarios, coupled with paintings of messy, passionate, unleashed sexuality are all depicted using loose, uncontrolled brush strokes, that often leave dripping paint behind. Her watercolors are made on a waterproof paper called Yupo, so before she even beings her process, she has initiated a battle between contradicting mediums. In her statement, she describes how this impacts her work:

“The loose, wet on wet technique of watercolor on Yupo paper helps me explore the ambiguities of our own boundaries. Because Yupo paper doesn’t absorb any of the paint all of the pigment sits on top, vulnerable to the elements and impermanent. The impermanence and vulnerability of the paint itself references the fleetingness of youth and the fluctuating nature of memory.”

Molly Segal is originally from Oakland and is currently an MFA candidate at The School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

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Stephanie Kunze and a Girl Who Dreams

 

There’s a lot to look at in Stephanie Kunze‘s illustrations. Minnesota-based Kunze draws with pencil and colors with Photoshop for an overall style that is contoured and slightly textured. The compositions are feminine and detailed and should feel busy, but the dream-like subjects still seem rested and calm. Worth a look is Kunze’s personal blog for a clearer picture into her thought and execution processes. 

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