Randy Ortiz’s Mutant Drake Covers And Other Surreal Wonders

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Artist Randy Ortiz has been tantalizing the eyes of illustration fans for years, illuminating concert and movie posters both professionally and as creative tasks for a great imagination. While past work emphasized ink line work and detailed black and white charcoal drawings, recent work has become more colorful, with flat background colors which perhaps surprisingly emphasize the darker thematic weight in the mystical figures and composition.

The self-taught Canadian artist uses evolved techniques to illicit a near-Surrealistic response from his often-human figures, draped in masterfully rendered drapery and fabrics. Despite the often serious undertones immediately noticeable in his work, the obvious sense of humor is evident (mutant visual remixes of Drake’s oft-mocked album cover seen below for example). In other works hooded figures clamor over each other, all reaching for a disembodied hand holding a small heart talisman representing love, or mystical-triangle-eyed cats eye floating balls of string. With Ortiz’s visual narratives and painting style evolving at a rapid pace, he is definitely ahead of other illustrator/artist to watch.

Alex Konahin’s Intensely Intricate Boroque Drawings

Alex Konahin

Alex Konahin

Alex Konahin

Alex Konahin

Alex Konahin is a draughtsman who works with an almost Maximalist desire to fill a blank page with intricate detail. Working on A3 paper and using fineliners and india ink, Konahin renders with shading and line-work that simultaneously resemble mechanical, architectural and floral drawing styles.

The Latvian-based artist’s most recent series, Little Wings, uses various insects as the starting point for what turn out to be intensely detailed, baroque-esque drawings.  Says the artist and graphic designer, ”I’ve been inspired to create this series last summer in the Netherlands. It was a fantastic time living in the countryside away from noisy cities…” Common insects such as flies, bees and dragonflies become the base for the draping hard-edged, and perfectly shaded lines of Konahin’s pen.

To see more of Konahin’s work, also visit his Tumblr. (via from89)

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Documenting Ephemeral Underwater Ink Sculptures

Alberto Seveso - Photography

Alberto Seveso - PhotographyAlberto Seveso - Photography

Alberto Seveso’s high speed photographs of ink mixing with water are hypnotic and fascinating. Each shot depicts pushes of color twisting and bending with an emotive cadence, lulling itself into an ephemeral sculpture, detailed with sharp visceral attention.

Although such imagery is not new, per se, this specific collection feels intrinsically magnetic due to the captive nature of submerged color naturally bonding or relating before diluting. It’s more about documenting the ease of abstraction than pushing a forced abstract agenda.

Albert Seveso’s Ink Clouds


We’ve all probably spent too much time watching creamer dissipate into coffee (or at least i did when i bussed tables). The interesting part to me wasn’t how beautiful and otherworldly the plumes looked, but how watching them never seemed to get old. Italian photographer Albert Seveso obviously shares this fascination and expands on it with varicolored inks which he captures with high-speed photography as they unfold underwater. Captured like this, the ink looks incredibly physical, like glass sculptures. Witnessing the transformation of substances feels like watching the cosmos themselves, which we are in a sense, and is why this is a series third graders and thirty year olds alike can get behind.

Annita Maslov’s Brooding Illustrations Done With Pen On Paper- Skulls, Roses, and Pupil-less Ladies

 

Tasty illustration work from Melbourne artist Annita Maslov. You gotta love the pen and paper approach. It’s so direct- you can almost feel the labor involved in every calculated line and stippled shadow. And Maslov’s subject matter fits well with her inky media of choice. Dark and brooding, the images sort of require drawing’s organic touch to stave off a cold, disconnected vibe. I’m pretty sure things would turn out okay if I never saw a vector skull presented as “art” again. If you’re doing stuff like this, then, well, do it like this. Please.

Sandra Beer’s Nostalgic Illustration

 

I really like these illustrations from Sandra Beer of Frankfurt, Germany. They somehow have a dirty and nostalgic feel all at once. If I encountered the animals and youngsters of Beer’s portfolio in the real world, I wouldn’t know whether to go in for the hug or run to safety. Where others may have tried for crowd pleasingly cuteness on some of her subjects, Beer’s not afraid to bring out the ink splotches and faded palette. Also, this aesthetic carries throughout all of her work, including the digital stuff. (via)

John Breiner’s Lush Mixed Media Works

Brooklyn artist John Breiner never seems to pin himself down to one medium. Whether he’s using watercolor or ink, he always brings a lot of humanity to the table without sacrificing any aesthetic value. Breiner creates work that is really full- both in composition and technique. He’s also pretty heavily involved with music as well. Seems like he’s got too much going on creatively to really be pinned down in any one place. Definitely not something for us to complain about.

Debra Scacco unlocks the 3 keys of greatness at MARINE CONTEMPORARY

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 I felt like I was peering into Debra Scacco’s personal journals as I walked around her exhibit BIRDS OF PASSAGE at Marine Contemporary. Her large and small works on paper feature her solid penmanship, which she glides across the surface into geographical formations like States and Countries. ”I Cannot Reach You” and “Hold Me” are just a couple of the repeated lines running throughout their corresponding paintings and although this may sound strange, there is almost a psychic connection between the viewer and the work that gives off the feeling of the syntax without actually having to read it. So, even if Debra wrote them in Itallian and I don’t speak or read Itallian, I would still be able to grasp the emotion trying to reach out for me. These are elegant and beautiful works that can take months and months to complete, especially the installation in the center of the room where she had to glue over 1000 golden pins together to form what looks like a map of all the pieces in the show combined onto one plane.