Marine Coutroutsios Constructs Brilliantly Colorful Abstract Paper Birds Inspired By the Native Australian Species Around Her

Marine Coutroutsios - Cut PaperMarine Coutroutsios - Cut PaperMarine Coutroutsios - Cut Paper

Inspired by the beautiful wildlife around her, artist Marine Coutroutsios cuts and constructs intricate, abstract birds out of colorful paper. Relocating from Paris to Sydney Australia, where she currently lives and works, Coutroutsios’s work is heavily influences by her environment. This series of hers titled Australian Birds contains patterns and colors that are found in the Australia native species she sees in her everyday life. With names like Yellow Tailed Black Cockatoo and Pale Headed Rosella, it is no doubt that the artist has named them after the individual bird species that each piece aims to resemble. It is interesting that although these pieces do not resemble the shape of a bird, nor do they possess a beak or even a head, we can still see that they are unmistakably birds. Resembling a target shape, it is almost as if the bird has been flattened into a nearly symmetrical circle.

Throughout childhood, Coutroutsios was always creating something, whether it is through embroidery or origami, which accounts for her incredible skill in paper cutting. Always feeling a connecting with nature, she also creates her own environments with her paper installations full of brilliant colors and shapes. She does not only pull inspiration from nature in the sky, but also nature in the water. Make sure to check out her Ocean Series where she takes her circular shaped method of sculpture and applies it to swirls of cut paper, creating whirlpools of color. (via BOOOOM)

“Through my travels I’ve realized how much I feel connected with my environment. It keeps me grounded and humble regarding our place in this world. With my work I’d like to inspire and engage you to reconsider the value of your surroundings. I think beauty is everywhere and it’s a powerful source of energy.”

– Marine Coutroutsios

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Myeongbeom Kim’s Surreal Sculptures Of Balloons, Deer, And Tree Branches Evoke Questions On Life And Growth

Myeongbeom Kim - Mixed Media InstallationMyeongbeom Kim - Mixed Media InstallationMyeongbeom Kim - Mixed Media Installation

Using themes of life and growth in nature, artist Myeongbeom Kim constructs stunning installations of surreal situations. His work often conveys a state of transition between two strange pairs, like he has stumbled upon bizarre metamorphoses frozen in time. Certain imagery is often repeated in Kim’s work, like deer, antlers, trees, and balloons. In one installation, a beautiful, still deer is acting as a trunk of a tree, with its antlers turning into tree branches.  In another installation, it is an inanimate object like rope or a bed that is transforming into a plant. Kim’s use of balloons is rather different than his typical nature infused environment that he creates. Balloons act in fantastical, irrational ways in the artist’s work. They hold up a three-legged chair, a noose, and even a woman’s hair. Kim’s work revolving around themes of life and nature, organic elements can also be found included with his shiny, latex objects. In an incredible piece of Kim’s, a cloud of bright, red balloons float while a tree trunk and roots miraculously come forth from its cluster. This displacement of nature found in his work creates a dialogue with the viewer, evoking questions of life, death, and nature’s place in our lives.

Originally hailing from South Korea, the currently works between Seoul, South Korea and Chicago. He has exhibited all over the world and has installed his pieces in a variety of innovative spaces.

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Zim and Zou’s Edible Cut Paper Monsters Reveal The Horrors Of Present Day Food Industry

Zim & Zou - Paper InstallationsZim & Zou - Paper InstallationsZim & Zou - Paper Installations

French artists Zim and Zou, comprised of Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann, took Spain by storm this May during EXPO Milan 2015 with their elaborate, thought provoking artwork. In store windows in the streets of Milan, the talented pair installed displays of intricate, three-dimensional work bursting with color and environmental messages. Created mostly out of carefully cut paper, Zim and Zou’s series illustrates the harmful effects GMO’s and aggressive farming can have on the environment, our own bodies, and the food industry as a whole. This fell in line with this years EXPO Milan theme for 2015, which is “Feeding the planet, Energy for life.”

The series in the display windows, titled Edible Monsters, reveals an array of sterile looking plants and animals, complete with mutant-like features and unnatural colors. Although these seemingly bright and cheery scenes evoke feelings of warmth and pleasantness at first glance, they all hold a bizarre aura, showing how the path that we currently are on can lead to terrible and irreversible effects on nature. One scene displays brilliantly colored, happy flowers that devour insects. In another window, one can see a fish swallowing harmful pills and a rabbit with a mutated third ear and crazed eyes. Each installation is beautifully done, but has a dark undertone of what effects chemical use and genetic manipulation can possibly have on our future. These eye-catching window displays shed light on the important subject of the world’s dietary habits and sustainability in a fantastical way. (via Design Boom)

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Nike Schroeder’s Large-Scale Embroidery Portraits Examine Female Body Ideals

Nike Schroeder - Mixed Media Nike Schroeder - Mixed Media Schroeder12

The work of Los Angeles based artist Nike Schroeder is full of a complex hybrid of mediums, as she integrates textiles, painting, and installation into her art. Her installations are creates from fiber where the colors of the threads have a very intentional meaning, as they draw their palette from the hues of the horizon at dawn. In one installation, the thread cascades to the floor, dripping off the canvas. Schroeder includes this same aesthetic in many of her other works, including her embroidery. The artist creates portraits out of needle and thread, with certain colors of thread hanging loose so to draw your eye to certain areas. Often, these bright colors and hanging thread come from the subject’s eyes or lips. Other times, this thread is not hanging loose, but cutting across to the other side of the canvas, dissecting the composition with multi-colored fibers. The harsh line Schroeder imposes onto her portraits guides your eye to specific elements.

As if Schroeder’s fiber-based installations and intricate embroideries were not impressive enough, many of her textile pieces are extremely large. Her nude portraits of women, which examine the beauty ideals of the female body, are actually life-size! These, again, contain long, hanging thread pouring down from certain elements, jolting our eyes to an “unlikely” part of the women; their pubic hair. This series among others in Schroeder’s expansive body of work include not only thread but paint as well. The artist often applies paint like she does fiber, with flowing drips. Schroeder’s work can be seen on view at Walter Maciel Gallery in Los Angeles from May 30th through July 11th.

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Hsiao-Chi Tsai Combines Fibers And Fashion To Create Eye-Popping, Wearable Art

Hsiao-Chi Tsai - Wearable Textile Art

Hsiao-Chi Tsai - Wearable Textile ArtHsiao-Chi Tsai - Wearable Textile Art

Combining fiber art, sculpture, and fashion, artist Hsiao-Chi Tsai creates beautifully designed wearable art using a variety of different textiles. He uses brightly colored fabric to construct intricate pieces that can be worn on your head and around your neck. The materials used are cut into floral-like shapes that flow organically around the person who is wearing it. A designer by nature, the artist bases these creations off his own illustrations. Because Tsai constructs his designs with such soft material, they appear comfortable despite their non-functional shape and placement. Each piece is creatively designed, utilizing asymmetrical forms and a unique color palette. Although this series, titled Wonderland, is not likely to go with anything in your closet, wearing one of Tsai’s pieces would definitely be a statement!

Creating sculptural, wearable art, this textile designer also forms brilliant installations using the same technique and style as his fashionable art pieces. Using the same textile material, Tsai builds large installations that loops, swirls, and hangs; completely transforming the spaces they are in. These pieces are much like his wearable art, using some of the same elements and cut-out fabric. Each installation is an explosion in its space, with endless gushing patterns. The surge of color in Tsai’s installations can turn any sterile space into a wonderland of cascading fabric flora. Both his wearable textile art series and his installations are uniquely sculptural and are created cleverly with an unlikely material.

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Ebony Patterson’s Complex And Chaotic Installations Question Race And Gender Politics

Ebony G. Patterson - Mixed Media Installation

Ebony G. Patterson - Mixed Media Installation

Ebony G. Patterson - Mixed Media Installation

Ebony G. Patterson constructs immense and elaborate installations filled with everything you can think of. The artist creates intricate work both attractive and kitschy, using mannequins, sunglasses, beads, beer bottles, and lots of gaudy jewelry. Interested in mixed media tapestries, video, and photography, she often incorporates one or all of these different techniques into her work, creating a complexity of objects and imagery. Exploring racial and gender politics, she uses photographs, mannequins, and clothing to make reference to ‘popular black’ culture in her art. Her work, so filled with patterns and flashy objects, is highly satirical, commenting on race, questioning stereotypes often associated with the culture she is representing. Concepts on beauty are also questioned, as the figures in her work are adorned with jewelry, bright colors, and flashy clothing. Although the mannequins appear to be making an attempt to look attractive, they inevitably look over-the-top and ridiculous.

When you see Patterson’s installations, there is an overwhelming sense of color and pattern inviting you to examine every last detail of the chaotic mass of objects. You get lost in a see of mismatched clothing and clashing patterns, all shown like a department store display. Transforming her mannequins into striking objects participating in her art, their individual genders are often blurred, pointing out pre-conceived notions concerning the masculine and feminine. Her installations not only have mannequins, but also still humans that appear to be inanimate until they spring to life, turning her installation into a performance piece. This talented Chicago-based artist creates confrontational work that, due to content and appearance, is not easily ignored

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Trevor Wheatley Places Slang In The Great Outdoors In His Text-Based Installations

Trevor Wheatley - Mixed Media

Trevor Wheatley - Mixed Media

Trevor Wheatley - Mixed Media

Trevor Wheatley - Mixed Media

Toronto based artist Trevor Wheatley takes common slang to the streets, placing words and lingo in the public sphere where you cannot ignore it. He constructs large-scale sculptures of words like “real talk” and “nah” and installs them amongst trees and in rivers. Can you imagine hiking and seeing the word “squad” as you looked up into the trees? His often boldly colored text becomes so out of place in the wilderness, creating a very surreal site. Each installation displays strong pop-culture references of phrases commonly used. Interested in typography, Wheatley’s text-based work is range in font, color, and materials.

Wheatley takes this common language and makes it static, giving it a more permanent element. Language and slang changes so frequently, a word or phrase could be outdated as soon as Wheatley has completed the installation. Nevertheless, they bring back nostalgia and even add a bit of humor to their environment. Slang and lingo can often bring to mind a certain type of person or stereotype that we associate with the word or phrase. Wheatley’s sculptures take us beyond these preconceived notions of language by taking them out of their usual context and placing them in a new environment. Like taking a word out of its original context can change it’s meaning, the artist gives new meaning and life to the lingo, as they are located in serene nature. (via Juxtapoz)

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Travis Rice Creates Installations Of Rainbow-Like Waves Made From Thousands Of Pieces Of Shredded Paper

Travis Rice - Shredded Paper

Travis Rice - Shredded Paper

Travis Rice - Shredded Paper

The installations of artist Travis Rice crush you with their intense, waves of color. Made from thousands of pieces of shredded paper, his installations resemble cascading rainbows as they explode from the ceiling and swallow up their surroundings. Each installation of his is a 3-dimensional painting, using colored paper as paint.  Rice uses these tiny paper strips and applies them like paint suspended in the air, adding an element of motion to his work. Being interested in mark-making, this artist uses a balance of order and chaos to form such complex installations. The color-strips are grouped together in his work to create a larger body of color, using the chaotic and unpredictable part to construct the larger whole.

Rice’s installations roll like waves of water from the ceiling to the floor in beams of color. It is as if they possess a life of their own, becoming living organisms that seem to expand and consume everything in their path. Many of his pieces form hills and ripples, resembling landscapes and bodies of water. The thousands of pieces of paper imply a constant motion, even though the installation itself is static.  Travis Rice further explains his artistic process and what inspires him to use such a tedious, yet dynamic method in his work.

I am interested in the most fundamental element of the graphic arts, the mark. I am currently exploring the idea of marks as objects and modules that repeat and evolve into larger forms. My installations explore marks as modules that accumulate to create ordered masses. The approach is similar to that of the impressionist painter but the brush stroke has been replaced by individual thin strips of paper that are the resultant product of a mechanical shredder.

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