Family Values: 5 Artists Draw Inspiration From Family

Zhang Xiaogang

Zhang Xiaogang

Song Dong photography

Song Dong

Seonna Hong

Seonna Hong

The saying “home is where the heart is” very rarely relates to contemporary art.  And though the works featured here are not directly about home, they are informed to some degree by immediate family,relationships and experiences that stem from it.  In a global spectrum of east meets west these five artists come from genres ranging from Chinese Avant Garde to lowbrow painting, from surrealism to contemporary portraiture, to name a few.  The paintings, mixed media works and digital media stills of artists: Song Dong, Brooke Grucella, Seonna Hong, Aaron Holz and Zhang Xiaogang exemplify the diversity with which the artists’ loved ones have become not only the subject for the works, but also at times part of the process, as well as a platform to tell a story that becomes increasingly universal.

I recall visiting the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco a couple of years ago to see Song Dong’s massive solo exhibition of works made with his family members as subjects, as well as a massive installation that incorporated decades worth of of family possessions as material.  His work is deeply personal, with a strong narrative thread, and truly draw you into his world with their reverence and profoundly flawless execution.  Zhang Xiaogang’s works from his series Bloodlines uses other family portraits as a vehicle for conveying the experiences of his immediate family that they experienced as he came of age during the Chinese Cultural Revolution.  Each piece in this series has a thin red line that weaves throughout the composition, symbolizing the connection of heritage and family.

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3,000 Ceramic Eggs Spread Out In China’s Loneliest Locales

Shi Shaoping installation3

Shi Shaoping installation6

Shi Shaoping installationshi-shaoping-eggs-designboom-19

The Metamorphosis Series by artist Shi Shaoping is a poetic look at life.  Shi created 3,000 ceramic eggs over the course of a year.  Each egg weighs about 22 pounds and as a group come in at about 48 tons.  The eggs were then taken to some of China’s loneliest locales.  From grassland to beach, deserts, and mountains, the ceramic eggs were spread out on the ground.  The entire project was documented with photographs and videos.

In a way The Metamorphosis Series is as much a site specific installation as it is a performance.  Shi set before himself an intentionally difficult project, one that would entail hard work, a journey, and perhaps transformation.  Like the egg, these too are a symbol of life.  However, they clearly also point toward potentiality – the field of eggs seems poised to hatch.  The exhibition statement goes on to relate about the project:

“Shaoping is like a fortuneteller who uses the 3,000 giant eggs to remind people of the weight of life. The beauty of the work is the unpredictability, and the unlimited imagination it brings.  The fragile yet vigorous eggs of life emphasizes that we eventually have to respect every single living thing in the universe. The sands may cover the frost-glazed castle; the soaring fallen leaves may blanket the ground. The persistence and power of life, however, will fight against the mediocrity and itself. The contradiction is the language Shaoping’s looking for to express his world of Metamorphosis. This triggers the speculation and discussion on contemporary art and life value.”

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Toy Art: Artists Incorporate The Objects Of Our Youth

Hans Hemmert toy art

Hans Hemmert

Yoram Wolberger toy art

Yoram Wolberger

Urs Fischer

Urs Fischer

I have to confess I am easily drawn to works of art that resemble or depict toys and other childhood objects.  At face value these works are easy, as all of us have some form of relationship or pre-existing association with the referenced nostalgic icons.  In other words, the works naturally engage us and draw us in.  However, these works, specifically those featured here, use the familiar imagery to interject layers of conceptual content, moving far beyond catchy into heavier implications, through expert usage of scale, quantity and context.

Context is key in these pieces.  Maurizio Cattelan is a conceptual master of context, as demonstrated in his piece Daddy Daddy, which features a large drowned figure of Pinocchio floating face down in a pool inside the Guggenheim.  The result is ironic, tragic and flawless.    As well, the practice of significantly altering scale such as Jeff Koons‘ balloon animal sculptures, Urs Fischer‘s Untitled (Lamp/Bear) and Yoram Wolberger‘s life-size sculptures of toy and trophy figurines, allows the objects to become monolithic, dwarf us and alter our sense of reality.

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Printer Uses Bird Poop To Do Exactly What You Might Think

Fabrizio Lamoncha bird poop

Fabrizio Lamoncha bird poop 1

Artist and desinger Fabrizio Lamoncha works with more than a little bit of humor.  His Pooprinter project statement begins with the quote “A common idiosyncratic habit in all birds is their inevitable punk nature to shit over our most precious belongings.”  The project is as innovative as it is gross.  Lamoncha slowly prints an alphabet on large sheets of paper by using strategically placed perches and the birds own droppings.  Check out the time-lapse video of the bird poop in action above and enjoy Lamoncha’s toungue-in-cheek explanation the project:

“A group of male zebra finches underwent this experiment with rigorous commitment. The author/captor, taking the role of some kind of 1984´s Big brother, is providing the implementation guidelines for the transformation of this countercultural attitude into a marketable artsy product. The observation of this group of non-breeding birds in captivity and the experimentation with induced behaviors has been rigorously documented for this task.” (via booooooom)

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Playful Installations Offer New Perspectives

Installations Installations

Installations

Artist Katrin Sigurdardottir offers unexpected perspectives by way of her installations.  For this first installation High Plane, Sigurdardottir set up two ladders in the gallery for visitors to climb.  The ladders lead to a hole for the visitors to insert their heads.  Once visitors peek through the holes they see they are at eye level with a miniature landscape.  Pale blue islands seem to dot a white sea, the visitor looking from god-like perspective.  However, the viewer also encounters another viewer peering through the other hole, reminded of their absurd size and situation.  In another installation titled Boiserie, she sets up an entirely white parlor-type room adorned with period furnitutre.  Mirrors mark the corners of the room which create an endless loop of reflections of the rooms interior.  The mirrors, though, are interrogation mirrors visitors can use to look inside the room.  The parlor is essentially only a set and roughly hewn from the outside.

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Elmgreen & Dragset Turn The Familiar Into The Absurd With Their Installations

Elmgreen & Dragset Elmgreen & Dragset 9

Elmgreen and Dragset installation2

The installations of Elmgreen & Dragset are a special brand of humorous – they are absurd.  The art duo blend installation art, design, and even performance to turn a skeptical eye toward the familiar.  The duo often begin with familiar objects and situations of habit.  A slight variation seems to make the situation absurd, the behavior required silly.  For example, a series of crates presumably contain art either resting in precarious positions or are already ruined.  A botched art delivery becomes a commentary on the value of art.

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Indoor Clouds Created Tetsuo Kondo Architects

Tetsuo Kondo Architecture indoor clouds

Tetsuo Kondo Architecture indoor clouds

Tetsuo Kondo Architecture8

The architectural firm Tetsuo Kondo Architects makes creative use of a unique material: clouds.  They carefully manipulate the humidity and temperature in buildings to create indoor clouds.  This eventually creates three distinct layers within the room with actual clouds gathering in the middle.  The firm uses the space to allow visitors to experience the cloud from below, within, and above.  In a way clouds are architectural components of the natural world that serve several practical purposes.  Tetsuo Kondo Architects pull these clouds inside not only as a strange material, but also as a symbol of the relationship between architecture and the surrounding environment. (Via Collabcubed)

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Photo Mural Optical Illusions

Mike Hewson installation3 Mike Hewson Optical Illusions

The photographic murals of Mike Hewson don’t exactly decorate the buildings they inhabit.  Rather, the murals create surreal optical illusions, highlighting the buildings by nearly making them disappear.  Hewson, creatively uses perspective to erase walls or even entire structures.  In some of his work this reveals the buildings inside – its purpose being put to use.  Other times, his work interacts with the building in order to recall an empty space or a space’s potential.  Hewson’s murals hints not only at structures that we’d often take for granted, but our often overlooked relationships with them.

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