The Tiniest Landscapes Painted On Miniature Pieces Of Food

Miniature painting
Miniature painting
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For the Turkish artist Hasan Kale, the tiniest morsel of food inspires visions of sweeping landscapes. Using his finger as a palate, he adorns almonds, M&Ms, and the most translucent layers of an onion with astonishing renderings of his native Istanbul. Where most landscapes take up entire museum walls, commanding attention with their sheer immensity, Kale’s work does the opposite. In these miraculous works of macro painting, the infinite nature of the earth, sea, and sky collides with the impossibly minuscule, heightening the preciousness of the Turkish terrain.

Here, snack foods become as wondrous as great feats of nature and man. On thin slice of banana, a storm rages, its brushstrokes transforming the very texture of the fruit into that of a saturated canvas. On the inner flesh of an almond, he imagines the legendary baroque architecture of the Nusretiye Mosque. The iconic building becomes vertically stretched as in a romantic masterpiece, extending upwards to conform to the natural shape of the almond. On these tiny surfaces, the grandiosity of the city’s architecture is expressed through the vibrancy of color and the dreamy, sweeping whims of the artist’s brush.

Perhaps the most poignant aspect of Kale’s work is its impermanence. Unlike the great canvases entombed in museums, these paintings will decay, perish, or be lost. The banana will rot into mush; the fragile quail egg might crumble. A stunning mosque might accidentally be eaten. But in the meantime, these imagined landmarks exist for the sake of our wonderment. Take a look. (via Colossal)

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Photographs Of Istanbul Protests Unlike Those In Any Newspaper

Barbaros Kayan photography6 protest Occupy Gezi Park protest

During the summer of this year a small group of people struggled to preserve a public park.  Quickly the scope widened, crowds grew, and the underlying anger became about something much larger than a park.  The demonstrations were considered to be widely peaceful.  At times, however, emotions and force erupted with violence.  Photographer Barbaros Kayan was on the ground to capture the unfolding protests.  There is a subtle difference about his series Occupy Taksim that distinguishes it from much of photojournalism covering the events, a certain frank grittiness.  Its almost clear from the images, the photographer is familiar with the city, intimate with the battleground.

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