Banned Photographs Of Gay Couples Kissing In Catholic Churches

gay couplesgay couplesgay couplesgay couples

For the series “Trialogo,” the Catholic photographer Gonzalo Orquin captured images of homosexual couples kissing in centuries-old Italian churches; beneath the ornate ceilings, the lovers’ embrace harmonizes with the architecture, elevating gay love to the religious beauty and devotion normally associated only with heterosexual marriages. By locating each shot within a religious and cultural context that has opposed marriage equality, Orquin courageously asserts the sacred validity of same-sex love.

The artist deliberately positions each pair at the church alter or in the center of the frame, visually uniting them under gilded crosses, vivid paintings of the crucifixion, and engravings of biblical passages. Like the churches themselves, architecturally built around the sacred concept of symmetry, the lovers are powerfully balanced, each assigned equal visual weight. Where one leans in for the kiss, the other braces to accommodate the movement. Heightening this notion of harmony and equilibrium, each couple is linked by similar clothing choices: two leather jackets, two dark suits, two soft cardigans.

Orquin’s lovers are seen as fully realized unit, unified under the Christian ideas of balance and wholeness. They complement and nurture one another as they bask in a golden glow, lit by radiant daylight steaming into the sacred spaces. Upon seeing these moving images, viewers might recognize the virtue and spiritual value that romantic love affords humanity, regardless of gender or sexual orientation.

Sadly, an exhibit of Orquin’s images, set to open last fall at the Galleria L’Opera, was legally threatened and ultimately shut down by the Vatican on the grounds that it was unconstitutional. In the eyes of the Catholic church, the photographs would “offend and infringe upon the advancement of man in the particular place for the expression of faith.” Orquin has articulated his outrage against the decision, and the work continues to spark passionate debate. What do you think? (via HuffPost)

Orquin’s beautiful photographs will be on display in New York’s at the Leslie+Lohman Museum this May.

Jan Fabre’s Macabre Remake Of The Pieta By Michelangelo

tumblr_mymx8xo85S1r0i205o2_1280

tumblr_mymx8xo85S1r0i205o1_1280

tumblr_mymx8xo85S1r0i205o5_1280

tumblr_mymx8xo85S1r0i205o8_1280

I’m sure you recognize the reference here. In case you were in doubt, the Belgian artist Jan Fabre is reinterpreting the most iconic work of the renaissance, Michelangelo’s Pietà.

Michelangelo’s famous work of art depicts the body of Jesus on the lap of his mother Mary after the Crucifixion.

Fabre’s interpretation gets personal, a little macabre, and a bit controversial…

In his rendition, Fabre places himself as Jesus with a butterfly perched on the side of his mouth. The heavy, dead-looking body wears a crisp, classy but torn suite. A closer look reveals a scarab at the edge of his cuff that is slowly drifting off towards the artist’s lifeless hand, which is tenuously holding on to a human brain.

The Virgin Mary’s face is replaced by a skull, which many would say is a reference to the Vanitas, the universal symbol of death.

The work was shown in Venice in 2011. This was in close relation to, but not a part of the 54th edition of the Venice Biennale. Given the place and the country (a very religious one) in which it was shown, you can image the controversy it created. The artist commented on the matter:

“is not to convey a blasphemous or even merely or provocative message. This work represents a “performance sculpture” that illustrates a mother’s real feelings when she yearns to take the place of her dead son.”

(via Exhibitionism and Flanders News)

Advertise here !!!

Albert Seveso’s Ink Clouds


We’ve all probably spent too much time watching creamer dissipate into coffee (or at least i did when i bussed tables). The interesting part to me wasn’t how beautiful and otherworldly the plumes looked, but how watching them never seemed to get old. Italian photographer Albert Seveso obviously shares this fascination and expands on it with varicolored inks which he captures with high-speed photography as they unfold underwater. Captured like this, the ink looks incredibly physical, like glass sculptures. Witnessing the transformation of substances feels like watching the cosmos themselves, which we are in a sense, and is why this is a series third graders and thirty year olds alike can get behind.

Stephanie Gonot’s Modern Still Life Photography

Stephanie Gonot‘s takes the classical still life and replaces fruit, flowers, and skulls with fanta, lunch meat, and ice cream. The results are clean and funny and a totally great time. Right now she is working on a bi-weekly column called “Food Mood” for the Italian magazine Red Milk where she takes fashion photographs as inspiration for her photographs of food. It also is a joy.

Daniele Del Nero’s Miniature Models of the Urban Landscape are Covered in Real Mold

“After Effects” is a “series of architectural scale models” by Italian artist/designer Daniel DelNero. The models are “constructed with black paper covered with flour and a layer of mold to create the effect of old abandoned buildings.”

My purpose is to talk about the sense of time and destiny of the planet after the human species through the sense of restlessness which abandoned buildings are able to communicate.

First of all, I’m seeing at least four different colors of mold going on with these. That variety alone is impressive. And his positioning and construction of the work is right where it needs to be. See more miniature, decayed urban scenery after the jump. (via)

Pierluigi Fracassi’s sculptures of Bones, Mirrors And Thread

Pierluigi Fracassi is a multidisciplinary Italian artist. He works in everything from photography to sculpture. In his installation work, Fracassi uses mirrors, bones, and thread to great effect. He also uses a lot of text in his works, like the mirrored piece, “Verresti al ballo con me?” (will you go to prom with me?). Cold and humane at the same time, definitely some interesting stuff going on. Click through to see more from the artist.

Rae Martini’s Evolved, Graffiti-Inspired Paintings

 

Rae Martini‘s work combines expressionistic urban texture with graffiti-infused flourishes of color. Throw ups, tags, and gradients are partially obscured by grime of every variety. Everything’s happening at once. What’s great about these is that they present an evolved aesthetic within the realm of graffiti without abandoning some its more classic techniques. See more from the Italian artist after the jump.

Franco Recchia’s Urban Skyline Sculpture Made from Recycled Computer Parts

 

Really cool cityscape sculptures created from recycled computer parts by Italian artist Franco Recchia. The cold mechanics of the dead computer hardware bring a strange quality to the works. And the claustrophobic elements of urban life are nicely captured in how compact each piece is. The sculptures give off a haulted vibe- it’s as if someone pulled the plug out of life itself and all that’s left is a series of plastic, green shells. See more from the series after the jump. (via)