Mr.– Metamorphosis: Give Me Your Wings

Japanese artist Mr. built an installation in the Lehmann MaupinGallery that is a gorgeous messy heap of cultural garbage/treasure. Using old anime posters, tarps, wood veneer cabinets, bouncy balls and the like, Mr’s installation overwhelms us with the incredible amounts of Stuff we as a society create; a physical version of contemporary internet culture’s constant sensory overload. His show is up for another three days, so if you’re in the NY area, catch it while you can! Press release:

“Mr. has envisioned a complex, chaotic installation that serves as immersive sculpture by forcing viewers to interact with the work and places them in a scenario that is psychologically unsettling.  His new body of work aspires to blur the distinction between the interior and exterior through the construction of structures and atmospheres inhabited by familiar objects that are conversely used to communicate the unfamiliar: in this instance, an experience most people have not lived.  Viewers are given insight to the psychological state of Japan all the while remaining alien to the experience. Composed of garbage and everyday objects from Japanese life, this installation stands as a reminder of the debris that blanketed Tohoku in the aftermath of March 11.”  Read More >


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Portraits of Women with Vegetable Weapons

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing Alison Zavos’ article on Tsuyoshi Ozawa.

Since 2001, Japanese photographer Tsuyoshi Ozawa has been traveling around the world photographing young women holding guns fashioned mainly from vegetables. As part of the process, the ingredients are chosen by Ozawa’s models and make up a hot-pot dish native to their country. After the portrait is completed, the “gun” is disassembled and Ozawa and his model share a meal made up of its parts.

Vegetable Weapon, a collaborative project promoting peace, will be on display at Misa Shin Gallery in Tokyo from September 21-November 2, 2012. Read More >


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Yukinori Yanagi Uses Ants to Manipulate National Flags

 

 

Japanese artist Yukinori Yanagi uses a pretty unique technique in his work. For years now, he’s created custom ant farms with colored sand and used the natural lifecycle of ants to manipulate images rendered with the sand. His work using national flags is some of his best. Soviet banners assembled into a pyramid. Japanese Hinomaru fractured by tunneling ants. The strong symbolism inherent in banners and flags lends the work a lot of power. The ants show us that even things that once seemed unshakable are susceptible to decay and eventual ruin, even at the hands of seemingly tiny, insignificant forces. (via) Read More >


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Yuken Teruya’s Intricate Cut-Out Trees

 

Yuken Teruya skillfully cuts intricate trees and other shapes out of banal, everyday objects like dollar bills, toilet paper rolls, and cereal boxes. The artist completely transforms what usually amounts to trash into delicate, beautiful art. Really makes you reconsider which material objects are “special”. Even the things we constantly overlook are full of creative (and even spiritual) potential. Teruya has a new piece in a recently opened group show at Denver’s David B. Smith Gallery. (via) Read More >


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Sculpture Clouded In Twine From Chiharu Shiota

 

Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota, who is based in Berlin, creates sculptural installations. Often surrounding miscellaneous items like clothing or furniture in tangled nets of twine, she places strict limits upon perception within her work. The stringy elements of her installations almost exist as clouds obstructing the objects that make up each piece. In this way, a work is viewed simultaneously as a singular object and as a product of its environment. Here, airy materials compound into an extremely weighted whole, repositioning our impressions of worldly material. (via) Read More >


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Ryuta Iida’s Paper Cut-Outs

 

 

Ryuta Iida is a Japanese artist who cuts out thick volumes of paper [i.e. magazines and books] to form sculptural objects. I had only seen this done once before by the artist Tim Hawkinson at his solo LACMA exhibit in 2005 and it has boggled me ever since. So, I was thrilled to find out about Ryuta, who is picking up where Hawkinson left off and doing it in their own way. Whereas instead of taking personal photos of themselves to cut into, Ryuta uses popular magazines, thus adding an element of pop culture to their practice. (via)

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Fumi Mini Nakamura

Originally from Japan, illustrator and graphic design artist Fumi Mini Nakamura now works out of the NYC area. Her works in graphite and colored pencil feature a unique cast of characters: human figures rendered in striking photo-negative-like detail; flocks of feathered and toothed creatures; the occasional skull. The mixture of natural and imaginary elements always seems just right, rather than chaotic and disorganized. Examine some more of her works for yourself after the jump. Read More >


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Ralph Lagoi & Kate Lace



Artists Ralph Lagoi & Kate Lace’s
recent series entitled “Love Land Invaders,” is a portfolio of fashion, art, and “luxurious pop” set in some of Japan’s extraordinary love hotels. I feel like I am peeping in on some superhero’s intimate moment!

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