Jay Mohler Creates Fantastic Eyes Of God Weavings In Brilliant Colors

Jay Mohler - Weaved YarnJay Mohler - Weaved YarnJay Mohler - Weaved Yarn

Jay Mohler creates intricate, textile designs, weaving different colored yarns to create brilliant Mandalas. His geometric patterns create Ojos de Dios, Spanish for eyes of God, that are either eight sided of twelve sides, spanning up to over a foot. Mohler began hand-making his Ojos de Dios over 40 years ago, after he traveled to Guadalajara, Mexico in 1965. At a marketplace there is where he first saw these fantastic, small-scale weavings. He was extremely impressed by the complex patterns and how often they would be created from a single strand of yarn, crossing and looping over the wooden sticks that hold it all together. The beautiful Ojos de Dios can be found in many cultures, traditionally in Native American and Mexican as well as Tibetan, where they can hold spiritual elements. They are also a symbol of a physical eye, as the designs of the weavings revolve around the center “eye.”

Based out of North Caroline, Jay Mohler uses wool yarn in all types of colors, including metallics, to carefully weave his vibrant creations. You can buy an Ojos de Dios for your own on his Etsy page, where you can also order custom made patterns and even buy a DIY kit to make your own. Make sure to check out more of his weavings to see the scale and size of his many creations. (via The Jealous Curator)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Alison Moyna Greene Finds Balance Between Pain And Beauty In Her Seemingly Tranquil Mandalas Made From Spines of Cacti And Rose Thorns

Alison Moyna Greene - Cactus Spines, Ink, WoodAlison Moyna Greene - Cactus Spines, Ink, WoodGreene24

In the endless patterns of mandalas, one can find tranquility through its sacred geometry. You can find this peace in the spiraling colors of the mandalas artist Alison Moyna Greene creates. However, things are not always what they seem in her work. What is mesmerizing and calm at first glance is actually rough and defensive up close. The artist constructs her mandalas with individual cactus spines that jut out of the surface at the viewer. The process of using such a harmful medium by hand does not only take an intense focus, but also can be physically harmful. However, this meditative process of picking this material, painting them individually, and placing them onto their surface is a practice of care and love. Greene takes something painful and turns it into beauty.

The incredibly metaphor for transformation and healing is realized through this intricate series. The artist explains that her work acknowledges the coexistence of light and darkness and explores the balance of both necessary elements. The mandala is a traditional symbol of harmony. In this harmony, we find brilliant colors and winding patterns. However, we also find sharp, unsafe objects that make up this symbol. This contrast makes Greene’s work even more beautiful as she finds comfort in the amazing transformation of suffering into serenity.

This series of artwork uses thorns and cactus spines as a metaphor of changing pain and suffering. The process of hand plucking, hand painting and hand placing speaks about the transformation of pain into beauty and fear into love.

– Alison Moyna Greene

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Artist Turns River Stones Into Meditative Mandalas With Endless Patterns Of Colorful Dots

Elspeth McLean - Acrylic Paint on StoneElspeth McLean - Acrylic Paint on StoneElspeth McLean - Acrylic Paint on Stone

Australian artist Elspeth McLean takes ordinary ocean rocks and turns them into colorful, geometric Mandalas. Through intense detail and repetitive patterns, the artist finds meditation in painting these found stones with endless acrylic dots. The acrylic paint used on her pocket-sized creations allows her to add an element of dimension in her already layered colors. These intense colors create a palette so crisp and brilliant, it is as if the stones are encrusted with jewels. Painting dots has become so embedded in McLean’s art process, that she even coined the term “Dotillism” to describe her unique style. Each dot that is painted to create her intricate, endless patterns takes an incredible amount of patience and focus. Although completing these Mandala patterns may seem like a difficult task, McLean describes this process as a grounding experience where she can find enjoyment and experience reflection.

The Mandala is a spiritual symbol in Eastern religions that holds meditative properties. It is no wonder McLean has chosen such a strong, healing symbol in her work, as she believes in the healing nature of color and art. She pulls influence from seasons, cosmos, mythology, and ancient art to create her hand-held Mandalas. Her interest in the cosmos can be seen in her stones that are painted not as a geometric pattern, but instead as incredible constellations, still painted in her dotted signature style. An avid traveler, the Australian artist is now living in Canada, gathering inspiration from the new landscapes she perceives throughout her journey. (via Demilked)

Currently Trending