Jackie Gendel’s Contemporary Fauvism

An teacher of mine once said not to worry about if something has been done before, but instead of what you think has not been done enough. Jackie Gendel looks to be a die hard fan of Henri Matisse and André Derain, and feels the work they started has not been finished. It’s interesting to see how a style which was so radical a hundred years ago that a critic claimed in contempt that the work had been made by “wild beasts,” yet painted today seems perfectly beautiful and comfortable. The radicalism is gone, yet Gendel carries their spirit of autonomy of lines and colors. If you like what you see, you can see more of it at the Jeff Bailey Gallery until November 10.

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Clay Hickson’s Saved By The Bell Meets Matisse Collage Aesthetic

Clay Hickson‘s work has got that “Saved By The Bell intro meets a Matisse collage meets a Lichtenstein painting meets Greco-Roman sculpture” feel to it. He takes you into simple rooms occupied by simple foods, simple men, and simple women, with great speed and pacing. He uses an ancient and modern language. It’s a pleasant viewing experience. He tumbles and flicks.

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The Art Of The Steal

This is a must see documentary for anyone interested in the art world. I walked out of the theater shaking my head in disbelief!

The Art of the Steal follows the struggle for control of Dr. Albert C. Barnes’ 25 billion dollar collection of modern and post-impressionist art collection of, a treasury of works by Renoir (181 of them), Cezanne (69), Van Gogh (7), Seurat (6), Picasso (46) and Matisse (59), to name just a few, all of it tucked away in the Philadelphia suburb of Lower Merion in a Paul Cret-designed villa Barnes built for it in 1924. The collection contains some of the key works of early Modernism, including Cezanne’s Nudes in a Landscape and The Card Players, Seurat’s Models and Matisse’s The Joy of Life, jewel in the crown of his fauve period.

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