Zim and Zou’s Edible Cut Paper Monsters Reveal The Horrors Of Present Day Food Industry

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French artists Zim and Zou, comprised of Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann, took Spain by storm this May during EXPO Milan 2015 with their elaborate, thought provoking artwork. In store windows in the streets of Milan, the talented pair installed displays of intricate, three-dimensional work bursting with color and environmental messages. Created mostly out of carefully cut paper, Zim and Zou’s series illustrates the harmful effects GMO’s and aggressive farming can have on the environment, our own bodies, and the food industry as a whole. This fell in line with this years EXPO Milan theme for 2015, which is “Feeding the planet, Energy for life.”

The series in the display windows, titled Edible Monsters, reveals an array of sterile looking plants and animals, complete with mutant-like features and unnatural colors. Although these seemingly bright and cheery scenes evoke feelings of warmth and pleasantness at first glance, they all hold a bizarre aura, showing how the path that we currently are on can lead to terrible and irreversible effects on nature. One scene displays brilliantly colored, happy flowers that devour insects. In another window, one can see a fish swallowing harmful pills and a rabbit with a mutated third ear and crazed eyes. Each installation is beautifully done, but has a dark undertone of what effects chemical use and genetic manipulation can possibly have on our future. These eye-catching window displays shed light on the important subject of the world’s dietary habits and sustainability in a fantastical way. (via Design Boom)

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Tsuyoshi Tane’s Shimmering And Immersive Installation Using 80,000 Watch Parts

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As part of Milan Design Week 2014, Citizen teamed up with Paris-based architect Tsuyoshi Tane (DGT) to create “LIGHT is TIME,” an immersive installation of 80,000 watch base plates. The result is a shimmering space, golden and ethereal, delicate and glowing.

“We envision a space-orchestration where light will fill the space, composing, through sound and vision, a sense of light and time never experienced by humanity before. In this exhibition, we have created a space of light and excavated within it three primary volumes to exhibit everything from CITIZEN’s first pocket watch as the company’s origin, through to the latest satellite watches.”Suspended from the ceiling, the golden watch base plates, the basic component of watches, are reminiscent of droplets of suspended rain. The sense of suspended animation conveys the idea of time and timelessness. It’s when time stops that you become most conscious of it.

“LIGHT is TIME” won “Best Entertaining” and “Best Sound” in the Milano Design Award Competition, and was so successful that a reconfigured version was brought to Japan and shown at The Aoyama Spiral in Tokyo.

“Time is light. If there were no light, then there would be no time. In the 20th century mankind digitized time, measured it and continued to economize our time, until eventually we forgot about its relationship with essence of light. Without light we never would have had the wonders of the universe, the richness of our planet or the joy and pleasure of our life.” (Via demilked)

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Luzinterruptus’ Melbourne Installation Of Thousands of Books and LEDs

“Literature vs. Traffic”:

 

To the other side of the world we went, going from the sunny summer in Madrid to a mild and rainy winter, with the romantic intention of converting the modern and somewhat cold architecture of Federation Square, into a cozy, human and intimate space, which encouraged reading and tranquility.

 

So the folks at Milan-based collective Luzinterruptus (previously) went down to Melbourne and did their thing with lights (if you don’t know by now, they’ve put on some really ill installations using all sorts of LED lights), except this time they used thousands of books to “block traffic” in “a symbolic gesture in which literature took control of the streets and became the conquerer of the public space”. The pages seem to flow into one another as a cohesive whole and the LEDs add some sort of mystical dimension to the whole thing. I love the shots of people just swimming in the installation, which was up for a whole month. The positive message promoting literacy is just frosting on the cake. Click the jump to see more of what went down. (via)

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Iight Installations by Luzinterruptus

 

Luzinterruptus is an anonymous urban arts group based in Milan that uses “light as a raw material and the dark as [their] canvas.” They’ve created huge, luminous garbage installations and commemorated torn-down public pools with fiery blue liquid. Their works never stay on the street too long: “they take less than one hour to disappear”. A really nice project started, apparently, for the sole purpose of beautifying and adding a little wonder to their city. (via)

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Andrea Petrachi’s Android Figures Made of Found Miscellaneous Items

 

Andrea Petrachi (aka Himatic) creates android-like sculptural figures out of miscellaneous found objects like toys and cameras. They remind me of those creepy doll things that the kid from Toy Story put together, with a little RAMELLZEE “Letter Racer” style thrown in. Petrachi describes his work as a “symbol of our out-of-control desire to buy things”. There definitely is a lot of “stuff” that we go through that just sits around forever after we buy it. In a way, this project gives forgotten items a second life. They’re also cool to look at. Andrea Petrachi is based in Milan. (via)

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Marco Nicotra

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Marco Nicotra is a graphic designer from Milan, Italy. Much of his style is collage influenced with many textures and layers. Nicotra has done work for Super 8 Magazine, Heineken Jammin’ Festival, and Nitepeople Magazine.

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