Luzinterruptus’ Melbourne Installation Of Thousands of Books and LEDs

“Literature vs. Traffic”:

 

To the other side of the world we went, going from the sunny summer in Madrid to a mild and rainy winter, with the romantic intention of converting the modern and somewhat cold architecture of Federation Square, into a cozy, human and intimate space, which encouraged reading and tranquility.

 

So the folks at Milan-based collective Luzinterruptus (previously) went down to Melbourne and did their thing with lights (if you don’t know by now, they’ve put on some really ill installations using all sorts of LED lights), except this time they used thousands of books to “block traffic” in “a symbolic gesture in which literature took control of the streets and became the conquerer of the public space”. The pages seem to flow into one another as a cohesive whole and the LEDs add some sort of mystical dimension to the whole thing. I love the shots of people just swimming in the installation, which was up for a whole month. The positive message promoting literacy is just frosting on the cake. Click the jump to see more of what went down. (via)

Iight Installations by Luzinterruptus

 

Luzinterruptus is an anonymous urban arts group based in Milan that uses “light as a raw material and the dark as [their] canvas.” They’ve created huge, luminous garbage installations and commemorated torn-down public pools with fiery blue liquid. Their works never stay on the street too long: “they take less than one hour to disappear”. A really nice project started, apparently, for the sole purpose of beautifying and adding a little wonder to their city. (via)

Advertise here !!!

Andrea Petrachi’s Android Figures Made of Found Miscellaneous Items

 

Andrea Petrachi (aka Himatic) creates android-like sculptural figures out of miscellaneous found objects like toys and cameras. They remind me of those creepy doll things that the kid from Toy Story put together, with a little RAMELLZEE “Letter Racer” style thrown in. Petrachi describes his work as a “symbol of our out-of-control desire to buy things”. There definitely is a lot of “stuff” that we go through that just sits around forever after we buy it. In a way, this project gives forgotten items a second life. They’re also cool to look at. Andrea Petrachi is based in Milan. (via)

Marco Nicotra

7

Marco Nicotra is a graphic designer from Milan, Italy. Much of his style is collage influenced with many textures and layers. Nicotra has done work for Super 8 Magazine, Heineken Jammin’ Festival, and Nitepeople Magazine.