Shanti Grumbine Manipulates Imagery From The New York Times In Waves Of Textural Pixels

Shanit Grumbine - basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panel

Shanit Grumbine - basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panel

Shanit Grumbine - basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panel

Shanit Grumbine - basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panel

No matter what the medium, artist Shanti Grumbine manipulates her work by slicing it into fractals of distorted imagery. In her series titled Looking Awry, she uses front-page images from the New York Times, and prints them in large format. She then cuts and divides the image into hundreds of smaller pieces and rearranges them before mounting the squares onto wooden dowel. Each square resembles a pixel, creating a strange mix of visual information since they are not placed in their original spot. This hodgepodge of colors and shapes are referencing a digital file that is corrupted, in which we can no longer see what is originally intended to visually display. Although altered and skewed, we can still make out some of the original image in Grumbine’s work. If you look closely, you can see a woman’s face or remnants of a human body. Grumbine explains her journey while creating her wall reliefs.

These wall reliefs become monuments to the untold levels of mediation between my creative acts and the rest of the world.

Much like digital files move across digital highways or frequencies, Grumbine’s work seems to travel across the composition in waves. As each cut out “pixel’ is mounted on a wooden dowel, the dowels are all different lengths, creating a wall relief. These varying levels, confronting the viewer, form a new textural and visual element.  Further engaging the viewers are small, square mirrors that Grumbine integrates into each piece, replacing some of the “pixels.” Now, each captivating piece is not just reaching out at you in waves of visual complexities, but also include fractals of the viewer and its surroundings. You are now a part of the piece, a part of an endless source of aesthetic, digital information.  A master at carving new meaning into different materials, this Brooklyn-based artist also has a series of incredibly detailed newspaper cut-outs titled Zeroing, also utilizes New York Times newspapers. New visuals are sliced into each word, and even a wall relief in the shape of an orb is formed from its text.

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Prisoner Creates Epic Mural Out Of Bedsheets, Hair Gel, And Newspapers As a Meditation On Heaven, Hell, And Redemption

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Artist Jesse Krimes stands in front of his 39-panel mural Apokaluptein:16389067 (federal prison bed sheets, transferred New York Times images, color pencil) installed, here, at the Olivet Church Artist Studios, Philadelphia. January, 2014.

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In 2009, Jesse Krimes (yes that is his real name) was sentenced to 70 months in a federal penitentiary for cocaine possession and intent to distribute. The judge sentenced Jesse to a minimum security prison in New Jersey, close to support network of friends and family, but the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) opted to send him to a medium security facility in Butner, North Carolina.

His way of coping with the life-changing sentence went a bit more differently than you would expect. He got by with a little help from federal prison bed sheets, hair gel, The New York Times, and some color pencils. Although money was limited in prison, he never struggled to gather enough money to purchase these objects. You might be thinking these are random, but, in fact, they are what made prison life a somewhat more passable experience.

While experimenting with these four materials, Krimes discovered that he could transfer the newspaper images onto the prison bedsheets. At first he used water to do this, but that did not work. Hair gel, on the other hand, had the requisite viscosity to do the job. He was not aware that three years after, he would end up with a 39-panel mural. Each transfer took 30-minutes. Thousands make up the mural. Krimes only worked on one bed-sheet at a time, each of them matching the size of the tabletop he worked on. The laborious routine kept Krimes sane, focused and disciplined.

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Mernet Larson

At age 72, Mernet Larson is having her first solo show in new york right now. Her show Three Chapters is slated to be shown in three consecutive bodies of work– Heads and Bodies, Places, and Narratives. The first two have already come and gone, but if you’re in the NY area you should check out her Narratives chapter at the Johannes Vogt gallery before it gets taken down on the 27th . “These works navigate the divide between abstraction and representation with a form of geometric figuration that owes less to Cubo-Futurism than to de Chirico, architectural rendering and early Renaissance painting of the Sienese kind. They relish human connection and odd, stretched out, sometimes contradictory perspectival effects, often perpetuated by radical shifts in scale.” – New York Times (via)

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Pia Bramley’s Ink Wash Drawings

Pia Bramley uses ink wash to make impressionist drawings that are marvelous embodiments of the word Dreamy. But unlike surrealist artists, who consciously try to render a dreamscape and thereby make us think more about the idea of said painting being an interesting dream, Pia’s just make you feel like you’re dreaming when you look at her work. Which we could probably all agree is a real treat. If they look familiar, you might have seen them in the New York Times or on plates from Anthropologie.

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Brian Rea’s Modern Love

A collection of illustrations from Brian Rea‘s ongoing series for the New York Times‘s SundayStyles column about love and heartbreak. Nailed it.

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Ted Mcgrath’s Scribbly Illustrations

Ted Mcgrath is an artist and musician currently living in Brooklyn, NY.  His scribbly illustrations have appeared in a myriad of publications including The New York Times, New York Magazine, Bloomberg Business Week, NYLON, The Village Voice, and Bust.

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The Visuals Of Occupy Wall Street

NYC photographer Rachel Citron has been documenting the more creative side of the protests from the imaginative protest signs to the colorful and sometimes outrages protest uniforms. Read a short article by Citron about her experiences on the New York Times blog.

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