Olafur Eliasson’s Your rainbow panorama

Olafur Eliasson’s  dazzling “Your Rainbow Panorama” is a permanent installation on the rooftop of the ARoS Museum in Aarhus, Denmark.  The spectacular work of art has a diameter of 52 metres and is mounted on slender columns 3.5 metres above the roof  of the museum. Visitors can literally walk through the entire color spectrum viewing the world for the first time in all pink, green, blue and yellow tones.

“Your rainbow panorama enters into a dialogue with the existing architecture and reinforces what is assured beforehand, that is to say the view of the city. I have created a space which virtually erases the boundaries between inside and outside – where people become a little uncertain as to whether they have stepped into a work or into part of the museum. This uncertainty is important to me, as it encourages people to think and sense beyond the limits within which they are accustomed to moving”. -Olafur Eliasson

(via gaks)
 

 

To the Streets: Top Ten Public Works

Since my last post about Street Art Utopia’s “Best List” took off and caused a decent amount of response, I think it is important to involve the Cult’s own selection. Here you will find a carefully curated and crafted list of every imaginable kind of public form of expression and their respected historical contexts. More after the jump.

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Olafur Eliasson: your chance encounter

slow-motion shadow in colour, 2009. HMI lamps, colour-effect filter glass (blue, green, magenta, orange, red, yellow)

slow-motion shadow in colour, 2009. HMI lamps, colour-effect filter glass (blue, green, magenta, orange, red, yellow)

Danish-icelandic Olafur Eliasson has done it again! “Your chance encounter” is showing at the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Japan. His intent to make his work engaging and relevant in the tailored museum space brings the institution to life. The rooms and corridors are transformed through his use of light, mirrors, shadow, color, wind and fog. Eliasson re-proposes the idea of the art museum as not just simply a building we go into to see art removed from society, but as more of a public space with the potential to engage society and the urban environment. If you’ve had the “chance encounter” with Olafur’s new installation, let us know what you think- was he successful in doing so?