Photo Mural Optical Illusions

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The photographic murals of Mike Hewson don’t exactly decorate the buildings they inhabit.  Rather, the murals create surreal optical illusions, highlighting the buildings by nearly making them disappear.  Hewson, creatively uses perspective to erase walls or even entire structures.  In some of his work this reveals the buildings inside – its purpose being put to use.  Other times, his work interacts with the building in order to recall an empty space or a space’s potential.  Hewson’s murals hints not only at structures that we’d often take for granted, but our often overlooked relationships with them.

Creepy Ultra-Realistic Body Painting

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The people pictured here are not modified, mutilated, or even Photoshopped.  Rather they are only covered in acrylic paint.  The Artist Chooo-San carefully paints extremely realistic extra eyes and mouths, zippers, cords, and plugs on directly on to the bodies of her subjects.  Her work is so realistic, it’s nearly disturbing at times and surprising it isn’t digitally manipulated.  She says:

“But I guess I was a little sick of everyone making pictures with their computers and wanted to see how far I can go without those technologies such as Photoshop.  My works are all done with acrylic paints.  They are all painted on skin directly and I don’t use computers or anything to change the picture afterwards.”  [via]

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Igor Eskinja Creates Optical Illusions With Simple Materials

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Igor Eskinja’s simplistic installations are elegant and optical illusory. Using basic and inexpensive materials such as tape, wires, and cords, Eskinja practices his art with precise measurements and an architectural eye. His work straddles the transition between 2D and 3D perception. He thoughtfully uses the space of the wall and floor of his installations, requiring viewers to stand at a particular angle in order to experience the effect given in these photos. The simplicity of his form and the perception between what is visible and not introduce space for interpretation and meaning. Oftentimes, after the installation is over, the work is thrown out due to the instability of his work, drawing attention to the impermanence of the forms he creates.

Felice Varini’s Huge Installations Are All About Your Point Of View

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For artist Felice Varini it’s all about your point of view.  Varini takes this idea to its extremely literal conclusion.  From the perfect perspective his painted geometric shapes seem to float in front of your eyes.  However, in reality Varini works hard to make only appear this way.  In reality his pieces are huge, cover entire structures (at times multiple buildings), and carefully prepared to be seen from a precise viewpoint.  His large optical illusions underscore the subjective nature of art – it’s all about your point of view.

Devorah Sperber Pixelated Thread Spool Icons

Using hundreds of thread spools and a clear viewing sphere,  Devorah Sperber creates pixelated images of pop culture icons, famous logos, and reinterpretations of blue chip artworks. These works not only make viewers take a second look at the threaded installations but use the “wow” power of optical illusions to make us reconsider these famous icons and masterpieces from arts past.

Alexis Semtner

Oil and Acrylic on Linen

Oil and Acrylic on Linen

Alexis Semtner’s abstract paintings utilize optical illusion to distort the viewers spatial awareness. According to Semtner, her use of visual falsity is used to denote perception and draw attention to how ubiquitous the notion of hallucination is in the human mind. I like the comforting and almost calming colors juxtaposed to the disconcerting Escher-esque environments, I think that the combination works well to create a world of constantly changing perceptions.

Gneborg Cleverness

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Recently found Gneborg’s clever, clever photography. Analog constructions and simple visual tricks like oddly photographing 2 people at once look magically digital. They really make the most sense as a series, see what I mean after the jump.

Via Picdit.