The Colorful Abstract Paintings of Guy Yanai

I’m a little bit in love with the work of Tel Aviv-based artist, Guy Yanai. He chooses to paint routine spaces and objects that range from his therapists office to potted plants. He then abstracts the images into simplistic bright colored shapes that leave you with a graphic imprint of the everyday. Check out more of his work after the jump.

Studio Visit: Serena Cole’s Glittery Paintings Tap into our Dark Desires

As part of our ongoing partnership with In The Make, Beautiful/Decay is sharing a studio visit with artist Serena Cole. See the full studio visit and interview with Serena and other West Coast artists at www.inthemake.com.

Serena’s studio is in her Oakland apartment, a modest space that she has efficiently rigged to accommodate her needs. She’s set it up so that her studio takes up most of the apartment’s square footage, but she keeps things flexible with furnishings that are easily moved and rearranged. I’m always impressed with resourcefulness and am appreciative of the kind of ingenuity that comes out of necessity and that manages to circumvent a set of limitations. In fact, the idea of limitations kept coming up for me in thinking about Serena’s artwork because her pieces are very much visually dictated and confined by her reference material. Her work directly appropriates the fashion imagery of advertising campaigns and editorial spreads, highlighting the patterns and tropes used to elicit desire and encourage consumerism. In taking on this imagery, her work attempts to examine what is revealed about our collective psychology, the culture of consumption and escapism, and the complexity of fantasy. In our conversations, she acknowledged that she isn’t so much trying to create something new, but instead aims to deconstruct already existent imagery in the appropriation of it. But this is a slippery slope— in being so tightly tethered to the aesthetics of the fashion world, Serena’s work runs the risk of coming off as analogous instead of questioning. Serena is aware of this risk— in creating art within a framework already heavily loaded with well-established associations, value, and perimeters, she knows the trick is to get the viewer to recognize that there is actually a lot at stake amidst the glitz and glamour.

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Rainbows and Carcasses in Chase Westfall’s Abstract Paintings

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The paintings of Chase Westfall are pleasantly elusive.  His work often toes the line between abstraction and figuration.  He seems to often swing from sunny imagary such as flowers or rainbows to that of mutilated animal carcasses.  However, he never gives it entirely away.  The imagary often is obscured by a diamond grid work or its own abstraction.  The viewers eyes constantly shifts between deciphering the images and inspecting the pattern, neither resolving the other.  His oil paintings are executed on linen contrasting the soft surface with his hard edged geometric shapes.

The Multi-Perspective Art of Christopher Derek Bruno

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The work of artist Christopher Derek Bruno playfully interacts with perspective shifts.  Some of his art only comes into a cohesive whole when viewed from a very specific angle.  Other pieces have multiple forms depending on where a viewer is standing.  In a way, his art uses literal multiple perspectives to comment on multiple social perspectives.  As his work changes from one vantage point to another, the reading of any work of art changes with each viewer.  In this way one piece becomes several.

Sculptures Made Out Of Tiny Paint Droplets

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Artist Chris Dorosz uses a unique painting technique.  He drips paint droplets onto plastic rods.  When arranged the rods form a three dimensional image, a pointillism like sculpture.  Step back from the screen for a moment – the disparate dots congeal to from images of people.  The fact that this is similar to the way a low resolution digital image works is not an accident.  Dorosz revels in the idea of the drop as a basic unit of constructing a painting.  He says:

“Out of material discovery I began to regard the primacy of the paint drop, a form that takes shape not from a brush or any human-made implement or gesture, but purely from its own viscosity and the air it falls through, as analogous to the building blocks that make up the human body (DNA) or even its mimetic representation (the pixel).”

Stefanie Gutheil’s Paintings Are About to Lose It

The work of Stefanie Gutheil is a wonderful mess.  Her current exhibit at the Mike Weiss gallery has the atmosphere of the precise moment a party becomes a riot.  Gutheil’s paintings incorporate fleshy globs of oil and acrylic paint, fabric, glitter, hair, and fur.  The seemingly turbid materials match the paintings’ libidinous subject matter.  Even some of the paintings frames  only seem to exist in order to be defied – cat’s tails, pants, hats all push past gilded frames and off the canvas.  In what she portrays and how she portrays it, Gutheil’s work pinpoints a curious place precisely between fun and horror – the moment before the last finger loses its grip.

The Understated Dreaminess of Meghan Howland’s Paintings

The story of Meghan Howland‘s oil paintings are quiet like a secret.  Her work captures understated dreamy scenes.  A confusion of birds, hidden faces, a scarf that may or may not be choking its wearer – her work at once is lighthearted and hints at a darker undercurrent.
Her gallery relates, “Her paintings are often dreamlike, and yet carry a weight of something that is slightly more dissonant. The question of whether something is safe or dangerous, loving or hateful, is often unexplained in her work.”

A snapshot quality to the image, fill flash like lighting, lends the paintings the characteristic of a caught instant.  However, her painterly hand stretches the moment.  While definitely working a contemporary aesthetic, Howland’s paintings are at times reminiscent of Degas’ style and palette.

Gabriel Pionkowski’s Deconstructed and Reconstructed Paintings

Though the work of Gabriel Pionkowski may be constructed like a sculpture, he is definitely a painter.  Pionkowski meticulously takes apart his canvases and painstakingly hand paints each individual thread.  Then, using a loom, he reweaves the thread into a canvas once again.  Painters have deconstructed and reconstructed the concepts of painting for ages.  Pionkowski, however does this in literal sense.  His process of destruction and recreation reveals the literal and theoretical structure behind art and painting.  The reconstructed pieces reveal the typically hidden supports of the canvas while creating a kind of absolute abstraction.