Terrence Payne’s Narrative Paintings

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It is difficult not to imagine a narrative when seeing the work of Terrence Payne. The Minneapolis-based artist uses elements of design, iconography, typography, pattern and figure, all rendered in a decorative style and soft pallete but with subject matter that is anything but.  While the artist occasionally focuses on a central word or scrawled text behind the animals and repeating, archetypical figures, Payne’s paintings use loaded narratives that combine believable earnestness and well-intentioned antagonism.

To achieve the softness in the work, Payne first uses colored pencils to enhance the quality of light and jewel tones, then applies layers oil pastels which allows the the under-drawings show through. Payne says:

 ”I want you (the viewer) to see the mechanism of it. The idea is just how can I reinforce the sense of this being artificial, that these people aren’t real. They are just representations of what I am thinking about

Terrence’s recent work has been concerned with “cataloging the human effects of trying to keep your head afloat in an increasingly polarized world of haves and have-nots” and “examining a person’s perceived place in society” and how that affects the way the work is perceived. This most recent work will be collected in an exhibition alongside Nick Howard (previously here) called Cake, at the artist-collective space Payne helped found, Rosalux Gallery in Northeast Minneapolis (which was named Twin Cities’ Best Gallery in 2013). Cake opens October 12th and runs through October 31st.

Michael Gaughan’s Visual Punchlines Bring Comedy To Art

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Michael Gaughan represents a new breed of hyper-creative talents whose work spans an absurd amount of media. Known for a variety of projects (including city-wide scavenger hunts, his chat-roulette in a mock-dorm room rapping identity Ice Rod, and for renting out his apartment for couples needing a romantic getaway on Valentine’s Day), Gaughan creates with an almost child-like glee. Despite the playfulness in the work, however, there is a sophistication and consistency that separates it from most. This is particularly evident in his highly-technical watercolor paintings, where art-world in-jokes exist seamlessly with pop-culture rimshots. In an exclusive talk with Beautiful/Decay, Gaughan summarizes his motivations, ”Humor is not my main medium, but definitely a consistent theme in my life and my artwork. I think that putting yourself out there in a vulnerable way is really uncomfortable and nerve-racking. It is a lot easier to do things as a joke rather than take yourself seriously, and simultaneously I am equally motivated by the possibility of brightening up someone else’s day. I ultimately want to bring joy to other people.

Gaughan’s work references “(art) history…obscenity, pop culture, absurdity, personal experiences, fears, feelings, misunderstandings, language, human experience, and creativity as well. Skate culture is great too!” When asked about the obvious amount of time spent on each work compared to the relatively short amount of time to elicit a humorous response (and if that adds to the joke), Gaughan responds, “Ha ha I hope so. It is also important to remember that punchlines can stay with you… Just because the audience can “get it” in seconds, doesn’t mean that they won’t revisit again it in their mind. I think art-work that takes longer to understand doesn’t necessarily mean that people will remember any longer than something that took only a second to get...”

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Francesco Lo Castro’s Shifted Geometric Paintings

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The geometric paintings of Francesco Lo Castro are made from a time-consuming layering process that combines acrylic, spraypaint, occasional silkscreen and layered epoxy resin to create dynamic explorations of shape and form. This process is so intuitive that the artist says, ”Geometry is just a word; it’s an aesthetic. There’s no math involved in it.

The Italian-born, South Florida artist begins his work layering angular, taped-off shapes painted with aerosol and coated with a layer of epoxy resin. This layer is then sanded down, as is every successive layer, until the piece is finished. This process can take up to a month of 12-hour days to complete, according to an interview with New Times. Explaining his work, Lo Castro says ”To me, these paintings represent our entire universe. These shapes are atoms. They are galaxies. They are representational of all that combined. They all represent evolving structures that are constantly in flux and ideas that are constantly clashing with each other. And with these clashes, new ideas arise, and we evolve through them. We have billions of people finally waking up and networking with each other; even if we don’t speak the same language, we are getting to know ourselves in the process for the first time. This kind of communication hasn’t happened before.”

Lo Castro expands this point in the interview, explaining that the former lowbrow arts movement star turned to his current geometric style as an evolution – one which mirrors humanities’ own path towards singularity. The artist o notes that his own work has found an international community thanks to technology and internet exposure, and also because of the geometric aesthetic that we can all share. Lo Castro continues, ”I think geometry found me, because all you have are these colors and shapes. No matter what your age, your culture, or language you speak, everyone can jump in.“ (via coolhunter and broward-palm beach new times)

Creepy Four Eyed Cat Paintings

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Seattle based artist Casey Weldon’s newest series of work is a bit unsettling.  He’s painted a series of cats, each with four eyes.  While the premise sounds simple enough, the product is more jarring than one might expect.  Upon first viewing the paintings the animals don’t appear as mutated creatures or monstrous as you might expect.  Rather, the paintings seem to be making it difficult to focus.  As humans we have a sensitive awareness of faces, eyes being a primary reference point.  Perhaps because of this the two sets of eyes don’t seem as much like a defect in the cat as a defect in our ability to focus on the painting.  Also, Weldon’s choice of exclusively depicting cats clearly references the internet.  The animal’s unexpected rise to the top of internet meme-dom, nearly makes cat’s a symbol of internet culture itself.  The gallery statement for his current exhibit at Spoke Art further expounds on this by saying:

“Ranging from internal commentary on the state of contemporary culture to a satirical analysis of the internet in general, Weldon has deftly created a body of new acrylic paintings that humor and appall.  Through his thematic commonality of quadruple eyed animals, Weldon intentionally disorients the viewing experience by juxtaposing a subject that is impulsively attractive yet eerily disturbing. With this subtle manipulation the viewer finds themselves drawn towards these subjects, yet can’t quite focus on them, akin in many ways to the eye fatigue experienced by countless hours on the internet, often fueled by the mindless addictive nature of social media. The choice of cats specifically as his subject matter continue on Weldon’s commentary of the internet/social media. The immense popularity of cat culture and viral cat memes is unavoidable in this day and age, a point made all too apparent by the pairing of Weldon’s exhibition with a Lil Bub art show just two doors down this month at Spoke Art.”  (via supersonic electronic)

Chris Musina’s “Volatile Relationship” With Nature

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The human relationship with the natural world is a complex one that doesn’t seem to untangle anytime soon.  With animal life increasingly being abused and habitats encroached upon anxiety is understandably mounting.  Artist Chris Musina address these issues in painting and also sculpture.  Musina depicts the uglier side of the human/animal relationship.  Rather than highlight idyllic scenes of nature, he draws gruesome imagery of animal mistreatment to the forefront.  Animal carcasses are often kept as trophies, dead souvenirs of a once living creature.  Painting’s tradition of depicting killed animals is extensive – the fox hunt alone, for example, an entire genre.  Appropriately, then, Musina’s animal carcasses are not there to be admired but act as animals condemning the viewer.  They seem to be holding an accounting for their present condition in the painting as well as in a larger abstract sense. They act as a tool to deconstruct disassociation. Musina further explains his use of painting in addressing ecological and animal issues:

“Dealing directly with our increasingly volatile and uneasy relationship to the natural world, I draw from contemporary animal thought and a deep phylogeny of cultural cues. My work dismantles how we look at animals via “nature morte” painters, philosophy, hunting, museum dioramas, and the like. Manifested in life size compositions full of dark humor and bright color, I am addressing the animal as neither symbol nor object, but as subject, a subject aware of his or her own powerful symbolic nature. Painting represents the bulk of my practice precisely due to its place in the forefront of a history of representing animals. My paintings are populated with animal protagonists who stare back at the viewer in an uneasy gaze; aware of that place in our cultural history– asking for compassion, mercy, or simply to be put out of their misery.”

Jennifer Davis’ Painted Shooting Targets

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Visual artist Jennifer Davis is well-known on the internet for her whimsical and imaginative drawings and paintings (previously here). But in one of her latest series, Davis takes her trademark renderings and has paired them with an unlikely match, paper shooting targets.

In a conversation with Beautiful/Decay, the Minneapolis-based artist explains the history of the series, starting with inspiration for a printed target seen in an architecture/lifestyle magazine. “…I learned that I could get enormous packs of different colored targets from a gun shop for under $20.  I started off thinking more about the symbolism of guns/violence/innocent victims/”badguys”/etc. (one of the first targets I made was called “Riddled”- I cut an intricate pattern of tiny holes all over the target.)” Davis then began using the colored paper targets as a base, decorating them with hand-drawn and painted intricately unique characters.  The series evolved as Davis began taking commissions and painting other people’s ideas and applying them to the targets. “I started doing a lot of commissions, which morphed the way I was thinking about them. It is a fun exercise for me to paint someone else’s vision- it has stretched the way I think about the targets. I no longer relate them only to violence. I think about each one differently and it is interesting for me to play with adding whimsy or beauty to such a symbol. I am transforming them into something new.”

Eloy Morales’ Masked Self Portraits Are Actually Hyper Realistic Paintings

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It is almost difficult to believe that these self-portraits by Spanish Eloy Morales are oil paintings.  His oil painting are generally executed on large panels such as the one above.  Morales carefully blends colors and layers to flawlessly recreate his portraits.  He nearly seems to consider each painting a separate test of his abilities.  Morales is known to write notes prior to a painting of goals to meet that he felt weren’t met on a previous work.  However, there is more to his work then a simple recreation of a photorgaph.  Morales explains in Poets and Artists Magazine:

“I am interested in working on reality through the use of pictorial codes, previously understanding that it is a false relation and I always keep in mind that painting is an independent expression. Finding a meeting point that truly represents my vision keeps me going on painting.” [via ignant]

Victor Castillo’s Eerie Parable-Like Paintings Of Children In Masks

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The paintings of Victor Castillo have a unique eerie style.  He began drawing from a young age inspired by cartoons, comics, and album covers.  Castillo finally attended art school but found himself disillusioned with his time there.  After leaving school he spent some time working with an experimental art collective in his native country of Chile.  Next Castillo relocated to Barcelona, Spain.  It is in Barcelona that his signature style solidified.

His painted world are most noticeably populated by children wearing clown-like masks: a red nose protrudes from a white face and any eyes are conspicuously absent.  Though the masks smile, there is something disturbingly insincere about the expressions.  Castillo carefully sets up each scene of his paintings almost as a sort of visual parable.  A small narrative unfolds hinting at a larger message.  Political themes such as greed or abuse of power begin to emerge within the symbolism of each piece.  Castillo makes use of narrative tools often found not only in painting, but also comics.  A statement from a past solo exhibit at the Jonathan Levine Gallery further explains the symbolism behind his paintings:

“In this exhibition, Castillo’s allegorical visions of the current socio-economic world crisis come in the form of spooky children’s tales. Through acrylic works on canvas and drawings on paper, his cast of masked, hollow-eyed children serve as a vehicle to convey ominous narratives of survival, greed and indoctrination. Inspired by vintage animation, his paintings are like theatrical sketches of tragicomic situations. With cartoon-like figures in the foreground and lush, classical landscapes in the background, Castillo’s dramatic baroque lighting completes the effect of exposing corrupted innocence.”