Christopher Murphy’s Paintings Of Memories

Christopher Murphy - Painting Christopher Murphy - Painting Christopher Murphy - Painting

Artist Christopher Murphy paints memories, using old family photographs as source material. He paints the Hoover Dam, large family gatherings, his younger self, and more. Murphy’s work is technically very good, and the realistic renderings of his paintings to look like photographs. They also depict quiet moments. While a lot of them involve people, there is very little tension among subjects. Colors are desaturated, which ages the look of them. Murphy spoke to New American Paintings about his work. He describes the overarching theme of his paintings, as well as his decision to use old photographs for reference. He says:

Imagination playfully cavorts with authenticity to fabricate the essence of memory. It is at this intersection, between the poles of fiction and truth, that my current paintings and drawings are situated.  Issues of contrast, specifically of finding harmony between dissonant elements, have been a constant theme in my work.  I see my paintings as opportunities to explore the conceptual contrasts of reality versus illusory and permanence versus ephemeral as applied to memory.

I choose old family photographs (largely culled from my own family’s albums, but supplemented with a selection of found photos from estate sales and thrift stores) to serve as the basis for my work, because of their unique qualities of semi-permanence, staged semblance, and ostensible candidness.  In these photos, skies fade to pale yellows, skin tones sink, and details blur and grow fainter with time.  Sometimes, dated technology necessitated blank stares or static poses, caused colors to skew, or impacted the framing of an image. By either exaggerating or minimizing these characteristics, along with re-contextualizing figures and objects or dramatically re-staging the action of a photo, the divisions are obscured between the reality that existed at the moment of the photograph, the memories of that moment, and the possibilities of reality that are presented in my work.

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Andreas Englund Paints a Portrait of an Aging Superhero

Andreas Englund - Oil Painting

Andreas Englund - Oil Painting Andreas Englund - Oil Painting

Andreas Englund - Oil Painting

You might have read countless comics and watched all of the movies, but how often do you see a geriatric superhero? Not much, I’m sure. Arguably, these types of stories are less fun and offer less fantastical possibilities. A lot of stories are action-driven; The less action means potentially less appeal. The paintings of Andreas Englund, however, offer a different perspective. In his series of realistically-rendered oil paintings, Englund highlights mundane, amusing, and the occasional ass-kicking moments by an aging Superhero. We see him eating clementines, watching tv, and choking at a dinner party. And it’s not boring.

Age is the overarching theme in this series. Author Philipp Windmüller’s writes a short essay about Englund’s Superhero and highlights his transition from young to old. He states:

… the character himself needs to face up reality and the aging process. He has to acknowledge to himself that he cannot live up to expectations and that the “perfect life” is nothing more than wishfulness. Englund’s artworks are focused on the maturing process. Even in the old age it is still possible to achieve something valuable although someone’s drive and vigour won’t bluster out explosively. Nevertheless everybody in his advanced age deserves to be recognised and respected for what he has achieved in life.

Recognizing that we live in an ageist society, Windmüller goes to write that we should identify and have empathy for this character:

Every one of us will find himself in the same situation as the “Aging Superhero” anytime soon. Of course, all good things must come to an end but we don’t have to bow to social marginalisation. One day we all will be old and start realise we need to dial it down and stop pushing on harder. In a worldwide society where mostly older people live, we need a survival packet with superpowers in order to make sure that everybody can film his own superhero blockbuster. (Via This is Colossal)

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Joan Ross Forges New Paintings Out Of Century-Old Works

Joan Ross - Painting Joan Ross - Painting Joan Ross - Painting

Australian artist Joan Ross manipulates paintings created by someone else, adding her own touches of highlighter yellow and fluoro orange. Sometimes, she animates these paintings. As Ross does this she simultaneously references a bevy of themes. They include the following: our attempt to civilize nature, imperialism, consumerism, our throwaway culture, global warming, tagging, naming, and claiming. It’s a tall order to engage these all of these things, so Ross uses historical paintings as a starting place.

Specifically, she uses the paintings of Joseph Lycett. He was an Australian painter producing work during the time that the British government colonized Australia (to use it to banish criminals, among other things), between 1788 and 1850. Taking his landscapes, lush and calming views of the ocean, Ross inserts loud, disruptive colors, graffiti, and symbols of invasion. A couple wearing hi vis yellow vests interrupts a group native residents. Other times, a similar couple vandalizes the natural environment. In many of Ross’ paintings and animations, subjects are destructive.

Lycett was a well-known painter, but ultimately found to be an impostor who forged his work. From a young age, this fact interested Ross, who mentions it in her artist statement. She writes:

As a child I was fascinated by the fact that the important colonial painter Joseph Lycett was a forger. In a sense I am continuing his tradition of taking something and forging something new out of it.

One of the reasons for Lycett’s fame lay in the fact he was one of the first to depicted the Aboriginal population engaged in traditional activities, and much of my work has on some level an element of the continuing dance of the races.

The mentality behind colonialism can manifest itself in many ways and the ongoing creep, nay, invasion of high vis yellow and fluoro orange are a modern-day example. I didn’t vote for these colours, yet they are everywhere!

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Wendy White And Five Other Artists Deconstruct Text In Paintings

Wendy White

Wendy White

Feodor Vornov

Feodor Vornov

Glenn Ligon

Glenn Ligon

Jose Parla

Jose Parla

Text phrases, words and letters abound in contemporary art, ranging widely from direct witty phrases to text that has become illegible in its adaptation.  With increased crossover between different fields of art, the craft of editing text in literary arts is a skill and practice that has been incorporated into the visual arts more frequently.  Jenny Holzer is an artist who comes to mind in this regard.

However, in this article I am examining the other polarity of text in art.  As an artist who regularly uses text in my own art work, I am always interested in discovering the ways in which other artists step beyond the all too prevalent witty-one-liner on the wall into an artistic language that is far more expansive and uniquely cultivated.  The artists included here demonstrate the beautiful grey area that emerges between abstract painting, graffiti, constructivist painting and the written word, to name a few.  Here text becomes a vehicle for additional forms of communication, used as a foundation to expand upon with the artist’s particular vision or agenda.

Wendy White, Feodor Voronov, Glenn Ligon, Annie Vought, Jose Parla and Jel Martinez are all artists whose work takes text and language and pushes way outside the box.  Wendy White’s use of the lines and structure of letters themselves is deconstructed and echoed in lines that emerge within her abstracted and color washed work.  In the images of her work shared here, I particularly love the way in which she goes beyond the canvas in architecturally reconstructing the text-like elements along the border.

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Zakaria Ramhani’s paintings feature Islamic calligraphy to question Islamic piety

Zakaria Ramhani- Painting Zakaria Ramhani- Painting Zakaria Ramhani- Painting

Moroccan painter Zakaria Ramhani creates large-scale portraits using Arabic calligraphy as a medium to convey form. Ramhani uses the beautiful painterly forms of Islamic calligraphy to depict and further expound and question political issues, Muslim identity, Islamic piety, text and image in the Muslim culture, amongst other things. Through his technique, the artist defies and contradicts the religious taboo on figuration, which is, to say the least, a very scandalous thing to do. These works are part of a collection called May Allah Forgive you, a name derived from childhood memories of his father, a landscape painter, trying to avoid working on commissioned portraits of the human figure for religious reasons. His father would explain to Zakaria that ‘only god will forgive’ him for the sins he  committed whilst painting the commissioned portraits.

Ramhani’s earlier work, precisely a piece called You Were my Only Love (2012), incited much controversy, as the work questioned religious tradition and the prevalent coercion at hand during the last couple of years in Egypt and the Middle East. The piece was banned from last year’s Art Dubai.

Zakaria’s first U.S. exhibition opened November 6th, at the Julie Meneret Contemporary Art (JMCA), a new gallery on the Lower East Side in NYC.

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Star Wars Imperial Forces Invade And Pillage Thomas Kinkade Paintings

Jeff Bennett - Digital Painting Jeff Bennett - Digital Painting Jeff Bennett - Digital Painting

It’s really easy to hate on Thomas Kinkade. His landscape paintings, which boasts themselves as “paintings of light,” are dull, wooden, and nearly all the same. Wholly uninteresting, Kinkade’s paintings beg to have a little pizzaz added to them. Luckily, artist Jeff Bennett has solved this problem. He’s added the Star Wars Imperial Forces to Kinkade’s work. Storm Troopers, Star Destroyers, and more invade the candle-lit houses, babbling brooks, and flower gardens. Houses are set on fire and landscaping is trampled. And, throughout it all, you are cheering for the historically “bad guys.”

Bennett’s keen Photoshop skills allow him to seamlessly integrate the two worlds, making them believable and thus very entertaining.  In a way, this series mimics the typical good vs. evil story. The exception is that who we perceive as good and evil is turned on its head. You’d think that tranquil Thomas Kinkade paintings would be harmless. But think again. Kinkade, with his lowest common denominator work, overpriced and mass produced chachkies, and greed (in 2006, his company was convicted of defrauding two Virginia gallery owners), is really the bad guy in this scenario. The Imperial Forces are helping destroy banality. (Via Adweek).

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Lexus Creates Car That Paints Your Portrait While You Drive

Lexus IS 300h - Digital Painting

Lexus IS 300h - Digital Painting

Luxury car brand, Lexus, has figured out a way to transform driving into art. Literally. In a new project titled Art Is Motion, the company combines art, software, and driving as a way to produce a painting as you commute to work. Lexus gave long-time art collector Walter Vanhaerent a new Lexus IS 300h hybrid vehicle that creates auto-generative portraits of the driver. As Vanhaerent drives, the car paints. Art Is Motion is part marketing and part art experiment.

The software used for Art Is Motion measures Vanhaerent’s speed, acceleration, and hybridity. It takes this data and converts it into brush strokes, which are modeled from the style of Spanish multi-media artist Sergio Abilac. The artist is really enthusiastic about this new technology. In a video interview, Abilac refers to the software as cloning his creative process. It’s not meant to be derogatory, and he seems genuinely excited at the prospect of this new technological assistant generating his work. It allows him to make things he would never had time to make otherwise.

The way the software renders a portrait is all based on how Vanhaerent drives. If he feels like speeding (using the gas engine), then the portrait is going have a lot of warm colors with abstract brush strokes. If Vanhaerent decides to relax and enjoy the scenery (using the hybrid engine), then that too will be reflected. His portrait will have smaller, detailed strokes with blues and cool greens.

The car features a large LCD display that dynamically paints Vanhaerent’s face as he drives. On the Art Is Motion website (www.artismotion.com), Lexus has recorded a few trips. In 2 minute long video segments, the portrait is recreated, showing us the speed the car was traveling, and more. By watching it, you really start to understand how much the style of driving affects the outcome of the portrait. (Via Gizmodo.)

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Rim Lee’s Paintings Of Human Emotion

Painting figure painting female figure painting

Korean artist Rim Lee creates The Mess of Emotion, a haunting series of oil paintings that combine performance, photography and oils. The multi-faceted paintings work well within the themes the artist plays with, as they literally show the woman’s tortured yet delicate  essence driven by emotional distress quite beautifully.

Lee plays model for her photographs; these [photographs] are then referenced in her paintings. The act of transferring the realistic image onto a canvas [a surface which usually allows for unworldly expression] indicates an unyielding desire to break free from the idea that judging character solely based on interpretations of physical characteristics and movements is in part, wrong.

Aptly so, the paint acts as a conduit for emotion and expression; the paint washes over Lee’s hyper-realistic physical portrayal, creating a dialogue between the two polarities.

The heavy-expressionistic brushstrokes fill the canvas with texture; they rise above anything else, as to indicate relevance on behalf of the otherwise invisible mental anguish she is going through. [via My Modern Met]

 

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