Sufi Influenced Cosmic Collages Explore Existence And Identity

Ala Ebtekar collage9 Ala Ebtekar collage7

Ala Ebtekar sufi collage2

The art of Ala Ebtekar is as simple as it is effective.  Ebtekar was born in the United States and raised in California but retained a strong connection to the land of his heritage, Iran.  You can nearly see in Ebtekar’s work a gazing at home from far away, a sort of portal.  Ebtekar is definitely referencing the cosmic with this work.  He says of the Sufi influence behind his work, “Sufis believe that existence is of two natures – both earthly and divine – and it’s that transition between these two states that’s represented by an arch. The arch could be in architecture, but it could also be a beloved’s eyebrow, and how that’s an entrance to that other space.”  Ebtekar also subtly uses Western imagery in addressing this “other space” – you’ll notice some of these pieces printed on the back of science fiction movie posters.

Beautifully Intricate Sculptures Made Of Paper And Wire

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sculptures

sculptures

Edinburgh-based artist Polly Verity creates detailed and intricate sculptures out of paper and wire. Most of her subjects are animals or mythological creatures and the size of her sculptures range from palm to life sized. The wire for the sculptures is built up into a 3D frame and this becomes the contour and outline of the creature. The wires are joined together through wrapping and pinching; no heat is applied to forge the wire. She then applies wet fine paper that she first sizes with glue onto the structure. The paper dries and tightens up while formed on the frame. Her creations are usually kept encased in a glass dome or box for protection and display.

In addition to these incredible sculptures, Verity also creates geometric origami paper art and wearable paper art. Her ability to meticulously create such delicate and intricate designs out of basic and simple tools like paper and wire is impressive. Be sure to check out her Flickr page for more photos, including some of a project she worked on with her brother involving the sculpting of crumpled tissue paper organs.

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Paper Art: Seven Artists Revamp Paper Into Sculptural Works

Tomas Saraceno paper art

Tomas Saraceno

Tomas Saraceno paper art

Tomas Saraceno

Tomas Saraceno paper art

Tomas Saraceno

Paper is a surface used by artists all the time, however we rarely see the true versatility of it as a material explored to the extent that is seen in the paper art featured here by: Ryuji NakamuraKyosuke Nishida and Brian LiJeff NishinakaTomas SaracenoMatt Shlian and Jen Stark.

Tomas Saraceno is a master of transforming a space and infusing it with an interactive surreal quality.  His installations that are constructed to provide viewers with the experience that they are walking on a cloud are absolutely captivating.  The soft dream-like magic of his work is more tactile and intimate, however, in this paper installation Cloud House featuring cloud like formations made only out of smaller geometric matte paper structures.

Vibrant Collages Mirror The Artist’s Oakland Surroundings

Amy Wilson Faville - Mixed Media Amy Wilson Faville - Mixed Media Amy Wilson Faville - Mixed Media

Inspired by her Oakland surroundings and the mysterious life of collected objects (from homeless shopping carts to a public disposal & recycling area), Amy Wilson Faville collages her own drawings in with an assortment of vibrant materials such as old mattress fabric, file folders, vintage wallpaper, and other scraps. Comparable to quilt-making, Faville’s compositions incorporate consistent patterns with eclectic pops of color, conceptually mirroring her subject matter.

Speaking on her Carts series specifically, Faville states, “My goal was to use the power of beauty to transform images of squalor into splendor.”

Giant Colorful Silk Screened Paper Installations

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Dominique Petrin installation4

The installations of Dominique Pétrin are visually overwhelming.  Images, patterns, and designs seem to cover every as much available space as possible.  Walls are plastered from floor to ceiling often even covering ground.  Her expansive installations overlay the outsides and insides of buildings alike.  Pétrin accomplishes her pieces by using large silk screened panels of paper.  The imagery recalls an internet of the early 90′s – a time when the overabundance of information and imagery the web had to offer was only beginning to come clear.

Giant Forests Made Out Of Paper

Wade Kavanaugh Stephen B Nguyen installation1 Wade Kavanaugh Stephen B Nguyen installation3

Wade Kavanaugh Stephen B Nguyen installation9

Brooklyn based artists Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B. Nguyen have been collaborating since 2005.  Together they create expansive installations that fill gallery spaces.  The installations’ size forces visitors to interact with it.  Made from natural materials such as wood and paper, their work carries an organic atmosphere.    The installations often resemble trees or entire forests, mangled, twisting and growing.  The paper seems to be giving a nod to its origin as an almost ironic choice of material.

Paper Cut Figures from Giant Sheets Of Paper By Nahoko Kojima

Nahoko Kojima sculpture7

Nahoko Kojima sculpture2

Nahoko Kojima sculpture1

The intricate work of Nahoko Kojima is created from single painstakingly cut sheets of paper.  For example, her newest sculpture, Byaku, is cut from a single giant sheet of Japanese washi paper.  Using a simple X-Acto knife like scalpel Kojima tirelessly works to pull the image out of the paper.  In order to maintain precision, she is said to change her blades about once every three minutes.  Kojima’s multilayered work also inhabitants a playful space between 2D and 3D.  At times her work is framed like a painting while other times presented like a sculpture.    [via]

Paper Animal Insides by Wendy Wallin Malinow

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Wendy Wallin Malinow paper5

The paper cut pieces of Wendy Wallin Malinow reveal the deeper goings-on of animals.  Malinow’s pieces are cut to expose an x-ray type view of various forest and ocean animals.  In addition to the bone structure, a meal is visible inside each animal.  While playful, there is also a sad quality to her work.  Malinow’s work reveals the nourishment and effort to needed to survive as well as the violence at times inherent in that. A squirrel has ingested some acorn’s while a wolf seems to be filled with the ghost of a red riding hood.