Mirror Shard Sculptures And Performance By Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen

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Superstition aside, these sculptures made from shards of mirrors were created by artist Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen.  If you look at the photographs carefully, in addition to the sculptures a person in a similar mirror-suit moves throughout the gallery.  The gallery also projects a video for this exhibit featuring  a person in this mirror-suit moving through commercial spaces in South East Asia and Denmark.  It is interesting noticing the virtually  universal nature of mannequins.  Rasmussen brings out that they allow us to imagine the way clothes will look on us, but on a deeper level we project what we want to be on them.  Similarly, these sculptures literally reflect those gazing at them.   [via]

Steeped In History: The Costume And Prop Designs Of Petra Storrs

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Londoner Petra Storrs is not just a set, prop, and costume/fashion designer– she’s an artist who collaborates with performers to transcend ideas beyond the ephemeral and into a sturdy cult of fantasy. The “reflective mirror dress” she designed for Paloma Faith, for example, not only sharpens the singer’s playful theatrical identity, but further investigates this concept of “the gaze”. In Dazed and Confused Magazine, Faith elaborates on the intention, “Obviously, as a performer, I am normally the observed, but I wanted to flip that dynamic around and make the audience the focus.” Storrs response, of course, was to whip up a garment that literally does just that.

But it’s not just creative camaraderie that gets Storrs’ juices flowing– she also finds inspiration from everyday objects and history, or everyday objects that hold history such as . . . tea. Camellia & the Rabbit, her latest design endeavor (collected here), involves performance artist Rachel Snider, who uses “tea as a central motif/metaphor” and a narrative “like sea shanties” to interweave “historical facts and stories of tea”– thus, evoking our own personal relationship to this British afternoon tradition.

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Gill Schneider And A Flying Circus

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Paragliding Circus from shams on Vimeo.

Paraglider Gill Schneider had thought a while about arranging an unusual pair: his love of flying and the circus.  After the jump a video captures the combination.  At first Schneider incorporates his parachute into various circus acts.  Before long, though, he takes a performer into the air, juggling gliding over the beaches.  The highlight of the video, however, is trapeze artist Roxanne Gilliand.  Hanging below Shcneider, Gilliand gracefully performs high over a small lakeside town.  The pairing, though unlikely, is a fascinating one.

The Performance Architecture of Alex Schweder

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A good deal of contemporary art blends characteristics from disparate practices: sculpture and painting, painting and photography, video and installation.  However, the work of Alex Schweder is a rare mix.  Much of his work is equal parts architecture and performance art.  Schweder investigates the way people interact with living spaces, and the way these spaces interact with their occupants.  The result is often a playfully surprising structure.  Some structures balance or rock depending on the movement of the inhabitants.  Other structures are photosensitive, their inhabitants leaving stronger impressions the longer they linger.  Regardless of the ‘performance’, his work encourages approaching ideas of the home and its occupants as almost a living relationship.

Doing Chores 20 Feet above the Sidewalk

Artist Angie Hiesl‘s site specific pieces blend installation and performance.  Her X-Times People Chair series elevates senior citizens to traffic-stopping heights.  Hiesl installs a steel chair on the fascades of buildings about ten to twenty feet off the ground.  Performers typically between sixty and seventy years old perch themselves on the chair.  The perching senior citizens perform mundane daily routines such as reading the paper or folding clothes for the duration of the perfomance.

A Human Ant-Farm by Snarkitecture

The architecture and Art team Snarkitecture have been in the art news lately for their installation at the entrance of the Design Miami Pavilion 2012.  Dig is an earlier installation from the team featured here.  Often  mixing elements of architecture  design, art, and performance, Dig was at once an installation and a performance.

The team filled the Storefront for Art and Architecture with solid architectural foam.  The artists then excavated a network of tunnels through the foam and inhabited them for the following month.  The performance was an artful investigation of contemporary architecture based on excavating rather than building, as well as building for necessity.

Tanner Teale’s Performative Documentations

Tanner Teale’s work uses every day materials to investigate the difference between performance and documentation. With each of his studies, Teale obsessively creates a kind-of “living” still-life that is full of tension and mystery. His most recent piece titled “Hair Dryer Knife Balloon” (pictured above) makes it clear that each of Teale’s portraits are comprised of a series of components that are completely reliant upon each other (like a formula or a recipe) in order to make the portrait as a whole work. Think of it this way: if that fan gets unplugged, the balloon will definitely pop.

Christopher Kline Makes Art with MMA Fighters and Battering Rams

Christopher Kline is a Berlin-based artist doing some pretty interesting stuff with installation and performance pieces, collage, textiles, and limited-run publishing. Kline’s works, though disparately mixed in scale and platform, maintain a common thread through his personal, vibey folk mysticism and material-based focus. From his “Holy Ropes” zine to elaborate performances involving MMA fighters and battering rams, the artist’s particular vision is a constant presence. Kline’s art finds comfort in the unfamiliar by exploring far out subject matter through down-to-earth means.