Classic Paintings Re-Imagined As Photographs

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Generic Art Solutions Classic Paintings

Generic Art Solutions is a duo made up of artists Matt Vis and Tony Campbell.  The two artists comment on present day anxiety by re-imagining classic paintings.  Their photographs are carefully staged, often to resemble classic works of art.  Their images are clearly populated with subjects, clothing, and settings that are all modern.  However, the compositions immediately bring to mind the paintings of Caravaggio, Goya, and Marat.  Perhaps a reason the images of the classic artwork and re-imagined in the duo’s photographs are still relevant is because people have never moved beyond the anxieties and problems that plagued us centuries ago.  The gallery statement for their upcoming exhibit at Miami’s Mindy Solomon Gallery expounds on that point:

“The work of Generic Art Solutions (whether it be a photograph, performance, video, or print) begins with a thoughtful re-examination of the human condition, and the effect of recurring cycles of technological advancements and cultural awakenings. But, how much has mankind really evolved? Aren’t we essentially still making the same mistakes? According to the artists, it would certainly seem so. Compare Gericault’s famed painting ‘The Raft of the Medusa,’ 1819, to the G.A.S. representation of Deepwater Horizon’s oil spill in April 2010, as depicted in their photographic work ‘The Raft’ (2010): these two artworks portray shockingly similar tales of human suffering brought on by corporate greed. Or, take Delacroix’s ‘Liberty Leading the People’ commemorating the French Revolution in 1830, and the perpetual revolutionary uprisings of the Arab Spring as seen in G.A.S.’s ‘Liberty,’ 2011. The artists state: “However evolved we may think we are, the folly of human behavior is still the root of all societal (dis)functions. This is a sobering thought that demands attention. But there is a message of hope in these contemporary homages: through thoughtful reexamination and a commitment to change, we can break the cycle of repeating our mistakes.”

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Laurent Chehere’s Flying Houses In Paris Suburbs

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Even in his commercial work French photographer Laurent Chehere clearly has a creative and curious eye for his surroundings.  An avid traveler, Chehere enjoys exploring the cities he visits.  This becomes especially evident in his series Flying Houses.  The series contains a number of photographs of floating buildings.  The buildings seem otherwise ordinary, perhaps tethered by power lines, quietly floating in the sky.  Chehere achieved the effect by taking photographs of buildings throughout the suburbs of Paris and digitally manipulating them.  A gallery statement  (translated from French) from a recent solo exhibit explains Chehere’s inspiration for the series:

“The artist isolates buildings from their urban context and frees them from their stifling environment. Houses fly in the clouds, like kites. Inspired by a poetic vision of old Paris and the famous short film The Red Balloon by Albert Lamorisse, Laurent Chéhère walked the districts of Belleville and Ménilmontant gazing at their typical houses. The images of the artist seize an unexpected levitation: held to the ground by unseen hands, like so many balloons used by the boy, these old buildings floating in the sky, sliding on the surface, they reveal to us their hidden beauty. Some houses are adorned with drying laundry or flower pots, outweigh other brands and shops fleeing the flames of a fire … All seem to find a second life. Uprooted from their hometown, they go to new heights. It’s a true invitation to travel and metaphor for the transience of the world, Flying Houses Laurent Chéhère’s series plunges us into a dreamlike and changing world full of gaiety and humor.”

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Quantum Mechanics Inspires Double Exposure Photographs

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With continuing scientific investigation, perception and consciousness increasingly seem to be much simpler than they truly are.  Its no surprise a great deal of contemporary art address issues of perception, and many artists are skeptical of assumptions about it.  This is where photographer Isabel M. Martinez picks up the topic with her series Quantum Blink.  She explains the series by saying:

“According to quantum mechanics we have forty conscious moments per second, and our brains connect this sequence of nows to create the illusion of the flow of time. So, what would things look like if that intermittence was made visible? This body of work explores that hiccup, that blink, that ubiquitous fissure in the falling-into-place of things.”

Martinez modified her camera to allow her to capture two exposures in an alternating stripe pattern to create one image.  The two exposures are timed only a moment apart and in a way mimic the model of perception she describes above.  Perhaps, what is most powerful about the images, though, is what they don’t capture: the moment in between the two.  Her series appears to mischievously encourage a curiosity and suspicion about our perception of the world around us and the amount assumption involved.  How much creativity is involved in simple observation?  This series is in line with Martinez’ larger art practice.

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Photographing The Weight Of Nakedness In Nudity – NSFW

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Julia Fullerton-Batten’s models seem naked in their nudity, and this is not just a clever play on words. John Berger, in his book Ways of Seeing, explains the difference: “Nakedness reveals itself. Nudity is placed on display. The nude is condemned to never being naked. Nudity is a form of dress.”

Here, in Fullerton-Batten’s Unadorned series, each model is indeed nude, as Berger suggests, posed on display, manipulated by the photographer to convey an idea, however . . . because he or she wears a certain type of nudity in the vein of old world masters from the 15th – 17th centuries . . . and because they are arranged in contemporary settings by female hands . . . and because their bodies are curvy and soft, as opposed to thin and hard . . . what results is also a fascinating feeling of nakedness: a complex historical/sociological revelation of us as a species in relation to gender, weight, and image.

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Seokmin Ko Camouflages Reality With Mirrors

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The Square is a series of photographs by Korean artist Seokmin Ko.  Someone in each photograph can be found holding a mirror toward the camera.  Given, the mirror is more easily found in some photographs than others.  Still, the mirror in somewhat hides the person holding it, the reflection blending in with the background.  This is essentially a camouflage that works by imitating its surroundings.  Ko alludes to this in his statement, and draws similarities to social situations.  Peer pressure for conformity and social norms compel people to use such a social camouflage.  That is to adopt behavior that mimics surrounding groups in order to hide a person’s individuality.  Still, fingers peek from behind the mirror – perhaps an allusion to the persistence of individuality.

Of course there are several ways to read Seokmin Ko’s work.  Like a mirror it reflects interpretations singular to each viewer.  Ko’s most recent solo exhibition illustrates this.  Interestingly the curater presents an entirely different approach to the series.  In part, the gallery statement brings out:

“Ko is an artist of his own time. The mirrors and reflective glass make more sense as portals to other dimensions—dimensions perhaps similar to ours or radically different.  The patterning reflected in the mirror is never a seamless match with the mirror’s immediate surroundings; these works are not about tricking the viewer. In Ko’s images, the human, as the carrier of artifice, is a kind of discrepancy and belongs neither in the natural world nor in the constructed world. This is obvious in the architectural photographs where the human presence disrupts the dehumanizing machine-made grid. Ko’s is a humanist vision amidst a world that has become foreign to its inhabitants as creators, but as Einstein famously said, “In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity.” Ko’s disruptions offer hope.” [via]

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Andres Serrano’s Powerful Images Of Death

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The Morgue (Infectious Pneumonia)

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The Morgue (Death Unknown)

Artist Andres Serrano‘s series of photographs The Morgue investigates ideas of death and our relationship with it.  Working with a forensic pathologist Serrano photographed the bodies with a near classical beauty rarely associated with the morgue.  Serrano ensured the anonymity of each person through tight cropping or veiling the face.  The way in which the light interacts with the bodies and their veils is reminiscent of Italian baroque painting.  The chiaroscuro of each photograph seems to underscore some mystery behind death balancing the morgue’s comparatively cold analytic approach.  Further, the careful attention to detail and composition dignifies each person.  Each subject, some actually unknown persons, are considered individually as initial shock gives way to contemplation and reflection.  However, these are not sentimental images.  There still remains a certain emotional detachment, a terrible loneliness in death, and Serrano’s intention is ambiguous.  Each photograph’s title is each subject’s respective cause of death, and have been inserted in each photographs’ caption.  Also, please note: Some may consider these photographs to be graphic and/or disturbing.  (via boum!bang!)

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Music Makes Paint Splatter Dance

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Photographer Martin Klimas‘ series “What Does Music Look Like?” is a fun attempt at answering that very question.  He uses paint as a vehicle for sound.  Klimas places brightly colored paints on a surface that sits just above a speaker.  Playing loud music such as Kraftwerk or Miles Davis makes the paint splatter above the speaker  with the vibrations making it “dance”.  The paint jumps and splattes while being captured by the camera.  Klimas snapped approximately 1,000 photographs to capture the set.

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Stephan Tillmans Captures The Final Flickerings of Televisions Turning Off

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The work of German graphic designer and  photographer Stephan Tillmans combines a fusion of new and old technology. Outdated cathode-ray televisions are turned off to reveal a strange but familiar geometry, which are then captured with modern, high-resolution cameras and techniques. This kind of CRT technology is no longer used, and the images the Tillmans collects are equally rare, as each is a finite moment that can almost certainly never be repeated. According to Tillmans, his work is a “photographic series of old tube televisions taken at the very moment they are switched off. The TV picture breaks down and is abstracted to its essential element: light. Each of these photographs is from a different TV, but it’s also the length of exposure, timing, and time the TV has been running before the photo is taken that affects the results.”

Tillman’s recent portfolio is broken up into two categories – the Luminant Point Arrays,  (seen above) made from color television sets, and the darker, more stark shapes of the Luminant Screen Shapings which are taken from black and white televisions (seen below). The more recent Screen Shapings lack color and some variation, but also have a more delicate, line-based visual strength. (via booooooom)

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