Wes Naman’s Scotch Tape Portraits

Photographer Wes Naman‘s Scotch Tape series is playful if not a bit creepy.  Naman wraps clear tape around his subjects’ heads severely distorting their face.  The tape tugs and squeezes lips, eyebrows, and noses making light of the idea of portraits.  Slightly disturbing, the portraits resemble smiling car accident survivors or botched plastic surgery victims.  Such simple but inventive ideas have made Naman a rather successful photographer winning him clients as diverse as High Times Magazine and T-Mobile. [via]

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The Floating Photographs of Li Wei

Chinese photographer Li Wei creates gravity defying work.  Li Wei’s captivating photographs depict people floating and flying over cityscapes.  At times mystical and other times comical, Li builds on a human fascination with flying resulting in mesmerizing images.  Rather than creating his images entirely in Photoshop, Li uses complex rigging systems to suspend his subjects.  The harnesses are then Photoshopped out of the images after the photographs have been taken.  Li explains his insistence on not creating his images solely through a computer saying:

“There’s a visceral feeling of shooting on location that can’t be duplicated on a computer.” [via]

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Fesetti’s Photographs Of Disappearing Figures

This series of images from photography duo Fesetti is aptly titled Disappear.  Typically photographers succeed in capturing their subject.  However, Fesetti intentionally and inventively keep their subjects visually out of reach.  Hidden by everyday objects re-purposed as a witty camouflage, the models are nearly entirely concealed save for a stray hand or pair of feet.  The series seems intended to be read as a how-to on disappearing or concealing oneself – a commodity itself in a hyper-connected social networking world usually fueled by photographs.

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Ilona Gaynor Is Designing A Bank Robbery

 

Ilona Gaynor is a designer and image maker hailing from the UK. Her latest project, Under Black Carpets, leverages bank heists as a medium of design. Through a series of intensive design and research exercises, Gaynor is using the strategies and vocabularies of robbery as a method for storytelling. Perhaps the most bizarre fact about the project is that is actually a collaborative effort with the NYC FBI Department of Justice and the LAPD archival department. Geoff Manaugh puts it well, stating that the project is an investigation into the “use and misuse of the cityscape where by architecture is considered both the obstacle and the tool to bridge or separate you from what you’re looking for” in both legal and illegal agendas. The project, ongoing, is currently comprised of an obsessive collection of materials that range from photographs of bank entrances to scale-models of get away cars. The project truly feels like the work of an insane person… and I mean that in the best way possible. Read More >


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The Photographic Seduction, Ritual, And Tension of Joanne Leah

Photographer Joanne Leah works in “seduction, ritual, and tension”.  Her pieces capture relationships, between two people or art and its viewer, as it alternately relaxes and strains.  In the series featured in this post the angle of the light is severe recalling the chiaroscuro of baroque painting.  The light, though, is cold, almost lonely, emphasizing the solitary figure in each photograph.  Whether, the subject holds teeth in her palm or wields a knife a drama is clearly unfolding.

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A New Still Life from David Brandon Geeting

The photography of David Brandon Geeting is a new kind of still life.  His photographs capture everyday objects, found or arranged.  The compositions of the pieces almost seem to reference classical art.  However, the content reflects an ultra-modern obsession with objects, picture-taking, and boredom.  His pieces have a definite fine art aesthetic though they’re populated with banal household items.  Geeting’s work reflects a new kind of still life, that in turn reflects a new kind of modernity.

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Swarming Mundane Objects of Thomas Jackson

Photographer Thomas Jackson captures every day objects traveling in packs.  His series Emergent Behavior features plastic cups, leaves, sticky notes, gathering into swarms.  These mundane objects fly through city streets and forests, mostly whimsical but at times menacing.  They reference self-organizing systems often found in nature such as herding,  swarms, insect mounds, and so on.  Regarding this Jackson says:

“The images attempt to tap into the fear and fascination that those phenomena tend to evoke, while creating an uneasy interplay between the natural and the manufactured and the real and the imaginary”. (via)

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The Fat-Fat Club- Mash-Up Food Photography by Aude Debout

“The Fat-Fat Club” is a hysterically childish new book by designer Aude Debout, who has a certain knack for combining images to create something ridiculous. This book imagines how the most gluttonous people see the world; people’s heads are hot dogs, buildings turn into overflowing desserts. In addition to the surreal content of this book, Debout definitely has an eye for the grid lines in compositions; knowing exactly where and how to combine these photographs. The layout of the book also shows Debout’s understanding of the medium she’s working with, as two separate, unrelated pages come together to form one cohesive new image.

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