MI-ZO’s Surreal Fashion Photography

We had written about the powerful duo photographer Zoren Gold, and graphic artist Minori Murakami back in May of this year. Now they are back with some new additions to their editorial section and it is just as packed with their wonderfully strong sense of collaborative design as before.

Max Fields’s Dark Arts

Texas-based photographer, Max Fields, captures dark photographs that vibrates with drama and life.

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Amanda Merten

Amanda Merten makes you wonder what sorts of things you could cook up with the time you spend diving deep into the bowels of the internet in search of sacred, yet-undiscovered images of cats to turn into potential memes. From styling to modeling to photography– the skill she contributes to The Smartest Thing She’s Ever Said. Amanda seems to do it all and do it all pretty well. We talk to her here about being a do-it-all, the intriguing story she’s working out with her collaborator Alice Gregory, and the mythic lack of good Mexican food on the East Coast.

Lissy Laricchia

Canadian photographer, Lissy Laricchia, creates the beautifully crafted dreamy world of fairy tale references in all its beauty and horror simply using smart props, location, minimal costume, and digital manipulation.

Antony Crossfield’s Intertwined Bodies

Photography by artist Antony Crossfield. I love his manipulation of the form of the body, as well as the feeling that each image is a still from a larger narrative.

Winkler + Noah Say “Not Even Death Can Stay Out Of The Show”

Each project carried out by Winkler + Noah has a meaningful focus with a motive to provoke serious thought. My favorite has to be the “Short Life” series. “We had been working for about a year and a half at the Shortlife project when we found a newspaper article with the following title: “DIES WHILE WAITING IN LINE FOR THE ART SHOW AND TOURISTS TAKE PICTURES”. An old man died while waiting to see the Raffaello’s exhibition in Florence and other tourists started to shoot at him with their cameras as if it were the most natural thing to do. This was the sad confirmation of what we were trying to represent in this photographic project: the end of respect for man means the end of everything: everything is legal, commercial and sellable. Nothing is private anymore, nothing can be stopped, everyone can do whatever he/she wants, without rules or morals, in a accelerating process that leaves nothing behind. Not even death can stay out of the show.”

Jorge Miguel

Jorge Miguel’s photographic series, De-Cabeza, is packed with portraitures of grotesque and raw energy that demands attention.

Thomas Struth

There is something very interesting going on in Thomas Struth’s approach to photography. It is incredibly clinical. So crisp and clean that the environment captured within his camera almost appears staged, and yet at the same time more realistic than in reality.