Animal Sculptures Created Out Of Plastic Beach Litter

animal sculptures

animal sculptures

animal sculptures

animal sculptures

French artist Gilles Cenazandotti constructs life-size animals out of litter he’s combed from beaches, recycling a variety of plastics and other detritus. Titled, “Future Bestiary,” this series of sculptures directly addresses problems related to throw-away culture and the waste that results from conspicuous consumption. When the creatures are inserted into natural landscapes, they almost appear digitally rendered because the contrast between natural and man-made elements is so pronounced. Of his work, Cenazandotti says,

“Impressed by everything that the Sea, in turn, rejects and transforms, on the beaches I harvest the products derived from petroleum and its industry. The choice of animals that are part of the endangered species completes this process. In covering these animals with a new skin harvested from the banks of the Sea, I hope to draw attention to this possible metamorphosis – to create a trompe l’oeil of a modified reality.” (via laughing squid and junk culture)

Jane Perkins Reimagines Classic Images With Found Plastic Objects

perkinsfoundobj7perkinsfoundobj2 perkinsfoundobj9 perkinsfoundobj4

Jane Perkins reproduces classic paintings using found plastic objects like buttons, beads, jewelry, shells, toy figures, LEGOs, and other plastic items. With her careful and meticulous arrangements, she faithfully recalls well-known works, enhancing the texture of them and creating interesting depth. She implements each item’s original color and shape skillfully into the compositions, illustrating shades and lines with the outlines of the objects. From afar, her pieces could pass for prints of these famous works, but up close, the viewer is granted another layer of appreciation for them. Perkins applies her background in textile design to her plastic found object arrangements, artfully utilizing the textures of each object. (via my modern met)

Advertise here !!!

The Surveyor Tape Installations of Megan Geckler

megan geckler installation1 megan geckler installation2

The slick site specific installations of Megan Geckler beam and bounce of walls like lasers.    Her installations’ ultra clean geometric forms and bright colors nearly hide the personal quality to the work.  The plastic rays are actually made of flagging tape – the kind you find just off the sidewalk typically used by surveyors.  Her installations intentionally bounce between art and design, industrial and hand made, cold and personal.  Also, just as her work shifts conceptually, it also shifts in shape from angle to angle.  Strands at one angle interact with strands at other angles as a viewer moves through the space. [via]

Rooms Become Massive Balloons in the Installations of Penique Productions

Stitched Panorama Stitched Panorama

The Spanish collective Penique Productions creates massive installations that at the same feel nearly weightless.  Using fans and colored plastic the collective entirely covers a selected space in a bright hue.  Though the concept is relatively simple, the space feels totally transformed.  The space and its furnishings are stripped of all their details and reduced to a set of shapes.  Penique’s Productions create an interesting way to investigate familiar places.  Interestingly the collective says regarding the installations:

“It works the relationship between fullness and emptiness, creating a dialogue with the space it temporarily inhabits.”

The Plastic Organic Paintings of Marion Lane

Artist Marion Lane creates almost otherworldly abstract paintings.  Her peculiar style and use of acrylic on panel seems to belong to an action other than painting.  Lane’s shapes appear to grow organically, emerging more from cell division than brush stroke.  However, the inorganic nature of Lane’s medium isn’t lost on her.  Rather, she seems to exploit the plasticity of acrylic paint, making it plain in the shape and sheen of her fantastic subjects.  Lane’s pieces at once explore abstraction and figuration as well as the natural and synthetic.

Chris Jordan’s Photographs of Bird Carcasses With Stomachs Full Of Plastic

“On Midway Atoll, a remote cluster of islands more than 2000 miles from the nearest continent, the detritus of our mass consumption surfaces in an astonishing place: inside the stomachs of thousands of dead baby albatrosses. The nesting chicks are fed lethal quantities of plastic by their parents, who mistake the floating trash for food as they forage over the vast polluted Pacific Ocean.

For me, kneeling over their carcasses is like looking into a macabre mirror. These birds reflect back an appallingly emblematic result of the collective trance of our consumerism and runaway industrial growth. Like the albatross, we first-world humans find ourselves lacking the ability to discern anymore what is nourishing from what is toxic to our lives and our spirits. Choked to death on our waste, the mythical albatross calls upon us to recognize that our greatest challenge lies not out there, but in here.

~cj, Seattle, February 2011″

For updates on Chris Jordan”s upcoming film MIDWAY, visit www.midwayjourney.com.

More pictures after the jump!

Kevin Champeny’s Mosaics Made of Small Figures Cast in Urethane

 

Kevin Champeny creates mosaics using individually cast urethane figures and random objects like hot wheels cars (above). Using small, colored fish, candy, flowers, etc., He’s done everything from self-portraits, to skulls, to roses. Looks painstaking as hell but the results are definitely worth it. It’d be cool to see some of these before they were assembled- just a pile of plastic. Click through to see more. (via)

Tom Price’s Melted Plastic Concept Furniture and Sculpture

 

 

Tom Price melts a lot of plastic in his work. He bends the distinctly man-made material to his specifications, creating highly conceptual chairs, tables, trees, and other objects. It’s easy to see which aspects of Price’s sculptures are the result of his molten process, and some element of intense heat and power lingers long after required cooling periods. You can almost feel the plastics melting in your hands, and smell the awful scent of burning tar. Such lingering power is what makes these works so intriguing. They’re also beautiful, but who’s counting? (via)