Lina Manousogiannaki’s Photos Of Aging Superheroes

LinaManousogiannaki_batman

LinaManousogiannaki_america

LinaManousogiannaki_spiderm

Batman holds a gun to his own head at the edge of an empty swimming pool. Captain and Mrs. America sip mixed drinks under palm fronds. Spiderman naps on the couch. These are our Superheroes, candidly captured in their off hours. But they’re not the Superheroes we’re used to underneath their familiar suits. These Superheroes are aged, white-haired and wrinkled, and somehow completely wrong. The characters we know may die, but although they live for decades they never grow old. Our heroes stay perpetually strong, alluring, and complicated, and always, always young.

Lina Manousogiannaki’s costumed heretics of “Superheroes Gone Old” represent more than the inevitability of old age. To her, the aging superheroes they serve as reminders of the damaged Greek political system, one that politicians and people of her parents’ generation have been unwilling or unable to change.

[The series] was conceived as homage to the generation of my parents, the same one as our politicians. They have been pretending to be heroes ever since the collapse of the military junta but time has caught up with them. My heroes are old and they are afraid of everything that they can’t control. … The heroes of another time can no longer save me as they have pretended to do for so many years.

There is anger in Manousogiannaki’s writing that isn’t reflected in her images. These heroes are worn out, slightly absurd, certainly pathetic. And yet, there is the suggestion of pride here, of perseverance. They haven’t divested themselves of their worn finery. They haven’t stopped fighting. In a country with a struggling economy and generational discord, the heroes are stooped and sad. Manousogiannaki’s intent may be to put them aside and lead her own fight, but these archetypical heroes seem to be saying that it will be harder than she thinks. Read More >


Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Powerfully Political Art Made From Food

three sculpture6 three sculpture3

three sculpture1

The artwork created by the Japanese art collective known as Three creates work with a political subtext as powerful as it is subtle.  Three often uses common food objects such as fish shaped soy sauce packets or candy.  For example, the installation Eat Me uses 7,000 wrapped candy pieces hung from the gallery ceiling in the shape of a house.  Visitors are encouraged to pluck candy from the installation and toss the wrapper in a corner set aside in the gallery.  Slowly throughout the day the ‘house’ of candy is transformed into a pile of trash – a symbolic recreation of the overwhelming destruction of homes by Japan’s 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

Read More >


Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Eugenio Merino’s Witty Political Sculptures

Artist Eugenio Merino produces overtly political sculptures.  His witty work explores issues such as class, violence, war, religion.  For example, the piece Redecorate Your Life is an ultra-realistic silicone model of a homeless man who seemingly fell asleep (or died?) while flipping through an Ikea catalog.  His home, however, is simply the packaging of the items he was glancing at.  Merino’s work cleverly comments on materialism, poverty, and  homogeneity.  His sculptures make a statement with a sense of humor while retaining a sense of gravity.

Read More >


Currently Trending

David Mendez Alonso’s Parts of a Whole

David Mendez Alonso is a Spanish born artist whose work is out of this world. He separates his elements around the page letting each vignette breathe and forming what I think is a quite explosive finished work. His pieces have a beautiful dialogue.

Read More >


Currently Trending