Pop Culture Installation Exhibit from Thank You Very Much! Artist Collective

Thank You Very Much, an artist collective out of Buenos Aires, looks like a really cool, ambitious group. Limiting access to different creative vehicles is never a good thing, and TYVM is definitely not trying to do so. Working with over 40 artists from around the world, they’ve got their hands in everything: production, exhibition, design/marketing, etc. Recently, co-director Luciano Podcaminsky staged in exhibition of five installation pieces at the Centro Cultural Recoleta in B.A. The show, which “mixes conceptual art with POP culture”, gives you a good idea of what the collective is interested in doing. Find more images and some words from Podcaminsky on the exhibit after the jump.

Lucy Gaylord-Lindholm’s Remixed Oil Painting

 

Lucy Gaylord-Lindolm’s  remixed take on traditional oil painting and art history injects elements of surrealism and pop culture into a familiar setting. Characters from The Wizard of Oz and Pinocchio find their way into the artist’s cleverly referenced paintings, establishing bold compositions where perfectly good paintings once already existed. The result causes us to look a little deeper into that which we previously took for granted. I’ll go wherever she’s leading with these. (via)

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New Work From Brecht Vandenbroucke

 

It’s been a while since we last looked at the work of Belgian Illustrator Brecht Vandenbroucke. Imbued with awesome pop culture and comics flavors, his work never disappoints. There’s so much going on in these paintings that I can’t always tell the difference between references to Adventure Time, and social commentary. But who says the two don’t mix?

Rich Pellegrino’s Perfectly Messy Portraits of Obscure Pop Culture Icons

Rich Pellegrino has a fantastic way of splattering paint and pigment all over the place in order to create vivid portraits of famous people and myths. He’s a fan favorite at galleries who have pop culture themed group shows, like Spoke Art in SF and Gallery1988 in LA. In fact, it just wouldn’t feel right to go to an exhibit based on any kind of film, comedian, or obscurely famous what-have-you without one of Pellegrino’s pieces in the space. His style is recognizable from across the room and he’s one of the few illustrators I’ve seen who employs a use of texture in his work that makes it pop up a little bit from the page even when it’s in the usual purchasing form of a print.

Faif’s Street Art Criticism

I’m loving the work of Barcelona, Spain based street artist Faif as of late. He’s recently been taking some well pointed jabs at the art world, street art, and pop culture as a whole with his wonky works on the street. Lets hope he keeps it up and other graffiti artists/street artists follow his lead  to never take what they do too serious. (via)

Rory Dean

Rory Dean deserves to be as prolific in the arts scene as pop culture references are within his work (read: very prolific). Dean, who graduated from the Ontario College of Art and Design in 2006, wields his brush and pencil with great acuity, throwing the world we’ve created for ourselves back into our faces with merciless black humor and insight. His colorful yet maddeningly dark paintings and drawings pull no punches in shedding the current state of affairs in an honest, and concurrently scary light. But cultural context aside, Dean’s work is mainly fun, quality stuff. You really can’t go wrong here.

Larry Mantello’s Candy Coated World

Larry Mantello’s colorful sculptures are candy coated shrines to american pop culture. Bright colors, glossy finishes, and cheap imported materials remind us of why pop culture is so appealing and disgusting all at once.

Michael Willis

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Michael Willis‘ visual language doesn’t consist of any single point of reference. Rather, it is a syncretic blend of multiple styles and influences – a sort of hodgepodge of 60s psychedelia, 80s computer graphics, and a modern view of pop culture. Imagery sometimes includes figures that are in the American cultural unconscious – Frank from Blue Velvet, for example, makes an appearance in a drawing. But more often than not this outlook on pop culture, especially looking back towards the 60s and 70s, is expressed through the utilization of stock imagery of anonymous, yet clearly old, photographs of people from days of yore.