Martin Klimas Captures Shattering Porcelain Action Figures Mid-Fight

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Martin Klimas is no stranger to meticulously timed photography. From his speaker-induced dancing paint splatters to his shattered blooms and vases, Klimas’ work captures moments in time that record a disruption of order. Klimas’ porcelain action figures are dropped from a height of about 10 feet, and it’s the sound of the figurines crashing that triggers the high-speed camera’s shutter release. This methodology results in images that represent a temporary, dynamic moment in time that becomes a permanent, static image through the art of photography. Klimas’ figurines appear to be engaged in aggresive battle, each shattering figure creating a narrative made possible from a singular image. Mid-destruction, these figurines convey a strong power and energy that couldn’t be perceived pre- or post-destruction. (via juxtapoz)

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Calamityware Combines Delicate Porcelain And Monster Attacks

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Made popular by the dinnerware imported by England from China during the 18th century, Willow pattern is a distinctive and delicate pattern. And probably the last place you would expect to see alien invasions, giant robots attacking cities and pterodactyls. Graphic designer and draughtsman Don Moyer started with a fairly basic premise, “I love to draw. The drawings I like best are those that make me laugh. Several years ago, I started drawing Calamityware —traditional willow-pattern dinner plates with a tranquil scene threatened by impending calamity.” Funded by a successful Kickstarter to realize his whimsical drawings into actual dinnerware, Moyer has realized his dream of correcting an ancient problem, that “too many plates have been too boring for too long.”If it all seems light-hearted, it really is. Moyer’s drawings retain the traditional line quality and palette of their inspiration, but add in sinking ships, flying monkeys, and villages on fire. These drawings are then transferred to blank plates and fired to set the illustrations. Definitely beats your grandmother’s antique china if laughter is what you are after.  (via mymodernmet)

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Jessica Stoller’s Porcelain Sculptures Exaggerate Feminine Objectification (NSFW)

Jessica Stoller

Jessica Stoller

Jessica Stoller

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Jessica Stoller

Jessica Stoller‘s porcelain sculptures exaggerate the objectification of female bodies using 18th century French aesthetics. Through the medium of clay, Stoller sculpts fluid and grotesque shapes, emphasizing the lack of boundaries between bodies and other materialist images related to consumption. She embellishes this unsettling bodily abundance with a soft, feminine, candy and ice-cream color palette and opulent adornments. These figures are often erotically or mythically charged.This creates an experience of surreal bodily and material abjection for the viewer, while addressing cultural concerns about the control of the feminine body. Stoller’s work, “Spoil,” is currently on view at PPOW Gallery in New York until February 8. (via hi fructose)

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Kate MacDowell’s Ghostly Porcelain Sculptures

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Artist Kate MacDowell uses porcelain clay to craft her nature-inspired works. MacDowell’s works are realistically sculpted and meticulous. Hollowing out a solid form and building each piece leaf by leaf and feather by feather, she intimately involves herself with the process of building.  The works themselves are beautiful, ghostly white and evoke a very serene feeling. Upon a closer examination, however, things aren’t quite right. A large bird has human hands instead of its normal claws, and an apple has a tiny skull inside of it. Mice have ears on their backs. MacDwell explains in a statement, writing:

In my work this romantic ideal of union with the natural world conflicts with our contemporary impact on the environment.  These pieces are in part responses to environmental stressors including climate change, toxic pollution, and gm crops.  They also borrow from myth, art history, figures of speech and other cultural touchstones.  In some pieces aspects of the human figure stand-in for ourselves and act out sometimes harrowing, sometimes humorous transformations which illustrate our current relationship with the natural world.  In others, animals take on anthropomorphic qualities when they are given safety equipment to attempt to protect them from man-made environmental threats.  In each case the union between man and nature is shown to be one of friction and discomfort with the disturbing implication that we too are vulnerable to being victimized by our destructive practices.

The careful construction and fragility of material MacDowell has chosen coincides conceptually with her work.  Read More >


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Sea Wreckage or Art? Mary O’Malley’s ‘Porcelain Crustaceans’

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Mary O’Malley’s Bottom Feeders is a series of oceanic ceramics that look as if they were discovered among sea wreckage. These “porcelain crustaceans” appear delicate and dangerous, as the aquatic life that crawls among the porcelain seems as if could consume and become the dish itself. Inspired by her home by the sea, O’Malley created this series with porcelain, red Iron oxide, 22 karat gold luster, and a cone 6 glaze that shes makes herself using a recipe called Alfred White. She enjoys creating work that juxtaposes seemingly disparate imagery or ideas, such as the series of urns she created that she intended to be humorous. Of this series, she says,

“What interested me with this series, is by applying the creatures to plates and bowls I was reminded of naturally occurring circumstances where nature takes over man made scenarios. Humans are constantly vying for power against the natural world but we can never quite seem to win. Once I started to create these pieces I then started to notice the same pattern going on in the world around me: moss growing on a concrete wall, barnacles growing on the side of a dock, tufts of grass poking up through cracks in the sidewalk, etc. Maybe I am interested in this series because it is a truer representation of the world we exist in.” (via)

Be sure to check out O’Malley’s Etsy shop, where you can purchase some of her work. She currently lives in New York.

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Documentary Features Retired Chemistry Teacher’s Incredible Geometric Ceramics

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PORCELAINIA from Dave Altizer on Vimeo.

Filmmaker Dave Altizer’s short mini-documentary Porcelainia features Bobby Jaber, an educator, scientist, and artist. After Jaber retired from teaching chemistry, he was able to focus his energies on porcelain work, specifically geometric designs based on molecular shapes. Jaber’s approach to his work is inspired by his scientist/artist predecessors, most notably Buckminster Fuller, inventor of the geodesic dome. Though he’s had a little financial success with some of his work, Jaber is clearly motivated by love and dedication to his craft. Be sure to stick around after the credits to catch Jaber’s priceless reaction to current technology.

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Porcelain Figurines Depicting Power Struggle As Sexual Tension

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Europe-Europe is a series of porcelain figurines created by the collective AES+F - a group made up of the artists Tatiana Arzamasova, Lev Evzovitch, Evgeny Svyatsky, and Vladimir Fridkes.  A first quick glance they may seem like typical decorative figurines.  However, it soon becomes clear that something is terribly/wonderfully wrong.  The collection, exhibited together in a case, seems like an orgy – people caught in various sexual situations.

Yet, something else makes this series especially interesting: the characters are often thought of disliking or even hating each other in real life situations.  A Neo-Nazi strokes the locks of a Hasidic Jewish boy, sweat shop workers pet their capitalist supervisor, a police officer fondles a rioter.  While these can easily be read as a playful and optimistic depiction of global unity, a sinister feeling lingers on these figurines.  It seems as likely that these hateful feelings are depicted as a sexual tension.  Political power struggles are illustrated as sexual power struggles.

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Penny Byrne Is A Ceramics Conservator Who “Damages” Ceramics

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Penny Byrne transforms vintage porcelain figures and other found objects into work that makes a humorous or political statement. Though the themes of her work are dark and heavy, the lightness and treatment of the porcelain contrasts this, formulating a new perception of these themes. As a respected ceramic conservator and restorer, she claims that what she is doing with these “sacrosanct” found figures is quite inappropriate with respect to her field of work. Byrne lives and works in Melbourne, Australia.

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