Drawings Of Life After Death

 

Gary Ward - Drawing Gary Ward - Drawing Gary Ward - Drawing

Gary Ward uses charcoal, graphite, oil pastels, and an overall sharp wit to examine humanity’s mess of emotion over the confusion of body and identity.

His Archeology Series, collected here, is a playful response to the quandary of life after death: how, despite fame, class, or notoriety at the end of it all, we are basically just a slew of skulls with slight form variations.

Regarding process, Ward, a self-taught artist based in Los Angeles, says he is “interested in how the mind and hand talk to each other in one uninterrupted sitting.” He likes to see the authorship of a flawed line and honors how each mistake can spontaneously charge the work in a new direction.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Photographs That Borrow From History To Critique Sexual Politics

Genevieve Blais - PhotographyGenevieve Blais - PhotographyGenevieve Blais - Photography

Genevieve Blais, a photographer based in Toronto, borrows imagery from classic art history paintings to unpack sexual politics relative to today’s contemporary palate.

Of her intention, Blais states, “The aesthetic/topical dissonance aims to elicit an uneasy response in order to subvert the implicit authority and sanctity of the icon.”

The result confronts and critiques art culture by sitting in an uneasy space between not only imagery, but also mediums– cameras and brushes, forcing us to clearly see the model as the true determinant– a staged powerful variant that has been with us since Caravaggio’s rule, humanizing the myth.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Vintage Portraiture Without An App

 Kathryn Mayo Winter and Douglas Winter - Photography Kathryn Mayo Winter and Douglas Winter - Photography Kathryn Mayo Winter and Douglas Winter - Photography

Kathryn Mayo and Doug Winter, a husband and wife photography team based in Sacramento, collaborate with their models to create vintage portraits, seemingly of the past, using the traditional wet plate collodion process. This type of photography was born in the 1850s, but soon faded from the foreground, due to the proliferation of more practical, less time consuming processes involving dry gelatin emulsion.

However, in today’s fast-paced iPhone app culture, where formatting is clean, easy, and instantaneous, ironically, the slow painstaking process is exactly what this artistic pair prefer about collodion. Mayo elaborates, “Each image takes about 15-20 minutes to complete from focusing the camera, coating and sensitizing the plate, exposing, and processing. So, models need to have patience as not each image comes out perfect, and it takes a few to get one we like–sometimes, there are times when the chemistry isn’t working up to par and we don’t get anything at all.” Regardless of outcome, their passion is not just about product, but discovery and investigation. Mayo continues, “I love the idea of using a process steeped in history and with the ghosts of photographers who have come before me.  It is a process that is wholly addicting.”

Currently Trending

Classical Photographs of Contemporary “Beauty” (NSFW)

Phillip Toledano photograph1 Phillip Toledano photograph9Phillip Toledano photograph2

In a classical compositional style, Photographer Phillip Toledano‘s series A New Kind of Beauty depicts subjects that have drastically augmented their bodies.  The photographs contrast classical ideas of beauty with the contemporary and nearly obsessive pursuit of it.  A fixation with beauty is ancient, but the images examine it in the light of modern body modification.  Toledano says of the series:

“I’m interested in what we define as beauty, when we choose to create it ourselves.  Beauty has always been a currency, and now that we finally have the technological means to mint our own, what choices do we make?”

Currently Trending

Portraits And Abstract Paintings Inspired By Glitter Bombed Lindsay Lohan

Jason Willome - Painting Jason Willome - PaintingJason Willome - Painting

Jason Willome uses a diverse array of materials: acrylic, glitter, rayon flocking, archival pigment transfers, and cement, to expose ephemeral palpitations we, as humans, emote from personal experience, art history, or popular culture.

His portraits, for instance, take inspiration from a tabloid shot of glitter bombed Lindsay Lohan. Willome explains, “It was really beautiful because there was this atmosphere of glitter all around the space of the image, and there were these great cast shadows being projected through the glitter onto Lindsay Lohan, by paparazzi flash bulbs. I thought this would be a wonderful way to create a connection between an image and the surface, to kind of soften the painted illusion, but play into it at the same time.”

Likewise, on a similar note, his “Technology Series” (second, above) further investigates “the atmosphere of the glitter bomb and interpreting atmosphere as paint material.”

For both, what emerges is an airy quote lifted from mainstream media, translated with imagery that avoids the weight of celebrity by embracing another more elusive aura: how everyday abstraction beautifully haunts these spaces we build or share together.

Currently Trending

Fatima Ronquillo’s Contemporary Portraits Evoke Old World Charm

A self-taught painter, Fatima Ronquillo layers her portraits with the traditional symbols and charms of classic-style portraiture — objects that meant different things in different times and have to be studied to be completely understood. Ronquillo’s  subjects similarly face the viewer decorated with blindfolds, eye patches, fauns, flowers — and by pulling them into the contemporary, we are reminded us of the aesthetic value of these objects that we are free to attach our own significance to.

Currently Trending

Archaic Technology As Painting Platform

Nick Gentry - Mixed MediaNick Gentry - Mixed Media

Nick Gentry - Mixed Media

According to Ray Kurzweil, scientist & Singularity theorist, “We [as human beings] can ‘go beyond’ the ‘ordinary’ powers of the material world through the power of patterns . . . It’s through the emergent powers of the pattern that we transcend.”

Similarly, these concepts of materiality, patterns, technology, and transcendence haunt the mixed media paintings of Nick Gentry, who hails from the London street art scene and beyond.

As far as process goes, Gentry engages in what he calls a “social art project”, whereas people mail archaic technology (film negatives, floppy disks) to his studio/gallery to help build the base of his work. Instead of just relying on a pictorial image, Gentry allows the “history” and “variety of unique memories contained in used objects” to also serve as the subject of each piece. The result is reminiscent of 1990s Electronica and aches of a strange collective sense of contemporary loss.

Currently Trending

The Creative Portraiture of Lauren Randolph

Collaboration With Ryan Schude

Collaboration With Ryan Schude

Lauren Randolph is a creative portrait photographer based out of Los Angeles, she is also known by her nick-name, “Lauren Lemon.” Using props and scenery, she highlights and emphasizes the features of her subjects, creating more than just a portrait but a story. Check out more of her images after the jump.

Currently Trending