Ollie Lucas’ Technicolor World Inspired By Graffiti, Glitch, And Design

S11 S12 S8tumblr_mlubxbLPpq1ra295to1_1280

Melbourne-based artist Ollie Lucas creates works where colors swirl together with an almost preternatural smoothness, like oil diffusing in water, with more jagged and hard-line separation. Lucas says, My work has always had graphical and clean elements to it. A past life as a graphic designer is to blame there’. Creating works that span painting on enormous wooden spools, to digital works on print and more recent explorations in glitch animations, Lucas explains his influences, ‘Exposure to the graffiti scene in Melbourne has made me question harmony in my work, I have a love for filthy, dirty and weathered paint splattered surfaces, but at the same time I crave clean, modern, hardline geometrics…This is what drives my practice, combining two visual elements that are polar opposites in search for a harmony that i may never obtain.

Lucas work has often confronts two seemingly-opposing forces, graffiti and graphic design, painting and printmaking, natural landscapes with digital glitches, and blends them together. When asked how his work has changed leading up to his solo exhibition Digital Landscapes, at Pierre Peeters Gallery in Auckland, New Zealand, Lucas explains his more recent explorations and realizations in printmaking and digital creation. “It’s the first show I’ve done that is 100% digitally created. I’ve always used digital processes as a starting point in my work, however I felt a finished work needed the element of ‘hand-made’ to make it unique, to separate it from the mass produced. Since creating hundreds of drafts and moving through the paper choice/proofing and printing process I’ve come to realize a print can be just as unique as a painting.”

Though many see printmaking and painting differing in both result and creative impulse, the artist explains the harmony and connection between the two, giving value to both,“Although I have worked with many mediums in the past I still consider myself a painter, mainly because I still think like one and approach my work like a painter would. I think my work reads like a painting also.”

Ollie Lucas’ current exhibition, Digital Landscapes is on view at Pierre Peeters Gallery in Auckland, New Zealand, from now through March 5th, 2014.

Read More >


Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Carolyn Frischling’s Dynamic Works Brings Printmaking Into The Digital Age

Carolyn_Frischling_Hypostatization_I Carolyn_Frischling_Quidditas_VII Carolyn_Frischling_Quidditas_VIII

Carolyn_Frischling_Hypostatization_II

While many mediums have a constant back and forth debate between an emphasis towards using traditional, conventional methors or more recently available techniques, printmaker Carolyn Frischling does not concern herself with the argument. The Pittsburgh-based artist investigates new techniques in both image creation and printing methods, while continuing to honor the constantly-evolving history of the medium. “I’m proud that printmaking comes out of a long line of democratic, inclusive ideals, that today is at the forefront of technology and creativity.” Like many makers of prints, Frischling uses several simultaneous techniques to achieve the airy and colorful visual textures in her work, differentiated only by the image creation beforehand using computer editing programs. When asked by Beautiful/Decay to explain the benefits of working digitally versus using traditional methods, Frischling first explains, “Digital art enables me to use the same thought processes of traditional printmaking without the toxicity of using traditional materials on a daily basis.”

These moody and ethereal digital works are printed with archival inks on paper, silk, glass and aluminum, heavy with an abstract beauty attached to their process. Frischling further explains her methodology, “Digital printmaking is incredibly nuanced. There is so much more I can do that I couldn’t do in traditional printmaking, although the only reason I understand digital as well as I do, is because the thought processes are the very same. Sometimes I do miss the physicality involved in other kinds of art-making, but my art isn’t about physicality, so I think in this instance,”The medium is the message.”

Ultimately, whether created by physical process or digital manipulation, the works speak for themselves with strong compositions, moody palates, delicate forms and attest to the time spent mastering any artistic discipline. When Frischling explains, My instinct is always to create movement and energy through use of color and form”, it is a goal separate from process and more located in ambition.

Read More >


Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Printer Uses Bird Poop To Do Exactly What You Might Think

Fabrizio Lamoncha bird poop

Fabrizio Lamoncha bird poop 1

Artist and desinger Fabrizio Lamoncha works with more than a little bit of humor.  His Pooprinter project statement begins with the quote “A common idiosyncratic habit in all birds is their inevitable punk nature to shit over our most precious belongings.”  The project is as innovative as it is gross.  Lamoncha slowly prints an alphabet on large sheets of paper by using strategically placed perches and the birds own droppings.  Check out the time-lapse video of the bird poop in action above and enjoy Lamoncha’s toungue-in-cheek explanation the project:

“A group of male zebra finches underwent this experiment with rigorous commitment. The author/captor, taking the role of some kind of 1984´s Big brother, is providing the implementation guidelines for the transformation of this countercultural attitude into a marketable artsy product. The observation of this group of non-breeding birds in captivity and the experimentation with induced behaviors has been rigorously documented for this task.” (via booooooom)

Read More >


Currently Trending

The Obsessively Detailed Linocut Portraits Of Mircea Popescu

Mircea Popescu illustration2 Mircea Popescu illustration8

Mircea Popescu illustration1

Romanian artist Mircea Popescu‘s series Head Stock unravels the typical portrait.  These obsessively detailed pieces are linocut prints – the image etched, inked, and impressed on paper.  Portraits often become stand-in’s for the sitter they identify.  Instead, Popescu’s faces float independent of bodies and clear facial features.  The images  seem to be piled with countless layers hinting at a physical face and pointing to something deeper behind it.  The complexities of the Popescu’s faces reflect the intricacy of identities behind portraits.

Read More >


Currently Trending

Daniel Lai’s Contemplative Sculpture Made from Books

 

Nice wall-mounted sculptures made from books by Tennessee via Malaysia artist Daniel Lai. The sculptures feature clay figures in “Thinker” poses positioned amongst artfully folded leaves from various books. These capture the quiet, contemplative mind-space brought on by a good read, and would make good company in any studio, study, or living room. The Internet and tablet readers are alright, but there’s something about print that just can’t be beat. Always up for a good tribute to ink on paper. (via) Read More >


Currently Trending

The Art Nouveau Sensibilities of Jugend Magazine

 

We’re not in the habit of sharing stuff that’s not contemporary here, but sometimes you come along something that shouldn’t be overlooked, as it seems relevant no matter when it was created, and could use a little more attention. Jugendstil, the German Art Nouveau movement, was named after the late nineteenth century literary magazine Jugend, which promoted the aesthetic within its pages and on its covers. If you’re looking for some fresh typography/design/illustration inspiration, check out this online resource, which contains lots of images from and info on the magazine. There’s even some Impressionistic stuff mixed with the Art Nouveau goodness, but it all comes off as really fresh. I wonder what Jugend, which didn’t make it out of World War II and Nazism, would be like if it were around today. Read More >


Currently Trending

Johnny Sampson is 30 artists in one

The Black Keys, The Hundreds, and Yonder Mountain String Band all share one thing in common – the incredible illustrations of Johnny Sampson. His original works have graced gig posters, t-shirts, and even the walls of galleries. Yet, his talent is so great and diverse as to enable him to do all that and more without ever repeating himself stylistically. Whether he’s ripping on old comic book covers, Lichenstein dots, or 70’s cult movie nostalgia, Johnny Sampson is doing it with a master’s flare and impeccable taste.

Read More >


Currently Trending

Chad Kouri: Renaissance Man

Chad Kouri always dreamed of being a designer, and he took the first major step towards making that dream a reality with a freelance gig at the age of sixteen.  Ten years later, he has become what some refer to as a cultural engineer.  A founding member of the Chicago-based art and design incubator, The Post Family, previous Art Director of Proximity Magazine and recognition as one of Chicago’s Newcity Breakout Artists of 2010 are only a few of his numerous accomplishments.  Kouri has been involved with more than thirty different projects over the last two years, and shows no signs of slowing down.  For many, there is still a huge chasm between the worlds of design and fine arts, but this distinction is of no interest to Chad Kouri.  Un-phased, he continues to breakdown the walls attempting to separate the two industries.  A recent collaboration with artists Stephen Eichhorn and Cody Hudson at the Patty and Rusty Rueff Gallery marks his first foray into exhibiting at an institutional level, but with an upcoming solo show at the Rochester Museum of Fine Art slated for the winter of 2012 it will obviously not be his last.  Kouri describes his practice as having, “equal interests in conceptual art, consumer culture, typography, design, jazz and the gray areas between these fields, my body of work is more a collection of various ongoing projects, thoughts and experiments tied together by a strong sense of composition, concise documentation and an overall vibe of optimism than a seamless display of a style or genre.”  I am excited to watch this process evolve, and I wish him good luck for the future – but somehow I don’t think he’ll need it.

Read More >


Currently Trending