Mind Bending Video Uses Projection Mapping And Large Robotics

Projection Mapping Projection Mapping

The engineering and design studio Bot & Dolly created the video Box.  In it a simple flat surface is visually transformed in unbelievable ways.  Projection mapping has been especially popular lately because of its extreme versatility among other things.  For projection mapping a computer basically maps a surface, one often considered too irregular for traditional projection.  The software’s images are then projected on precise locations on the surface.  In this way projects can appear to interact with the surface or produce the illusion of depth.  For the video Bot & Dolly seem to push the potential of projection mapping.  Flat surfaces are attached to large robotics, thus the projection not only interacts with the nontraditional surface but also its movement.  It does this so effectively that at times its difficult to remember the surface is indeed flat.  Amazingly, all of the effects are in camera – that is, no special effects were applied after recording.  After watching the video, its interesting to think about the potential use of such technology.  Bot & Dolly go on to speak about the project saying:

Box explores the synthesis of real and digital space through projection-mapping on moving surfaces. The short film documents a live performance, captured entirely in camera. Bot & Dolly produced this work to serve as both an artistic statement and technical demonstration. It is the culmination of multiple technologies, including large scale robotics, projection mapping, and software engineering. We believe this methodology has tremendous potential to radically transform theatrical presentations, and define new genres of expression.”

Daniel Canogar’s Mesmerizing Projections

Canogarinstallation9 Canogarinstallation11 Canogarinstallation

“My most recent sculptural installations are constructed with discarded electronic materials: computer, telephone and electric cables, thousands of burnt-out bulbs, meters of videotape, old slot machines, celluloid, DVDs, etc. The installations explore the short life expectancy of the technologies we cast off and their relationship to organic mortality.

These installations also seek to reanimate the lifeless. Light animations projected onto the installations appear to free the energy stored in the electronic waste, awakening in it memories of its past.

Through my work I try to bring dead materials back to life, reveal their secrets, revive the collective memory they contain to construct an accurate portrait of a society and an age.” – Daniel Canogar.

Advertise here !!!

Mini Tokyo Comes Alive With 3D Mapping Projection

Tokyo City Symphony3 Tokyo City Symphony1

This miniature city is a carefully modeled Tokyo at 1:1,000 scale.  The Roppongi Hills skyscraper, dominant in the Tokyo skyline, celebrates its 10th anniversary by creating this model titled Tokyo City Symphony.  In addition to being intricately detailed, the model Tokyo is accompanied by a 3D mapping projection set to a corresponding soundtrack.  The projection brings the metropolis to life adding an impressive level of reality to the tiny Tokyo.  Check out the video to see Tokyo City Symphony in action.

Nonotak’s Glitchy And Aggressive Audiovisual Installation

Nonotak installation5 Nonotak installation8

The audiovisual installation titled Isotope v.2 was created Nonotak – an art duo made up of Noemi Schipfer and Takami Nakamoto.  Light projections are projected on and through a box approximately thirteen feet on each side.  Accompanied by sound the projection begins rather subdued.  Low drones match lights moving and changing slowly.  Soon, however, the light and sound seems to quicken its pace, become glitchy, even aggressive.  Watch the video after the jump to see the Isotope v.2 in action.  The installation is a reference and response to Fukushima and its now infamous power plant.  Following the tragic 2011 earthquake control over the Fukushima power plant quickly deteriorated.  Using this as a metaphor for the human relationship with nuclear energy, the installation creates a type of immaterial prison.  Walls of light surround the visitors becoming ever more imposing as the projection progresses.

The Light Sculpture Of Joanie Lemercier

Joanie Lemercier sculpture9 Joanie Lemercier sculpture1

Joanie Lemercier sculpture4

The work of artist Joanie Lemercier resembles Tron type imagery that has come to life.  This piece’s materials, however, are really rather simple: paper and light.  Lemercier folds paper into variously sized pyramids which are then arranged as a composition on the wall.  The composition is visually mapped and a light projection is layered onto the installation.  The result is a futuristic glowing geometric pattern.  Lemercier is a member of AntiVJ – a “visual label”, a collective of artists that focus on light and perception in regards to art.  If you enjoy the work of Joanie Lemercier, check out the work of fellow member Olivier Ratsi.

Javier Riera’s Outdoor Interventions of Light

Spanish artist Javier Riera produces what he calls “light and geometry interventions” on landscapes.  Using powerful light Riera projects geometric patterns on to natural vistas.  The projections can appear to transform a treeline into a two dimensional plane.  At other times the light seems to add strict geometric shapes to the wilderness.  The light and patterns disrupt the perception of the view they cover.  Riera’s transposing geometric patterns onto natural scenery partly alludes to language, matter, and the way the two interact.

Michael Guidetti

"(Bounce Room 2), 2009". Digital video projection, watercolor on canvas

"(Bounce Room 2), 2009". Digital video projection, watercolor on canvas

Took me a while to figure out what was going on in this image (well actually, they’re almost all videos) but it’s an awesome visual trick. The rest of Michael Guidetti’s work is along the same vein. Kind of 2D into 3D…so 2.5D?