Nancy Rubins’ Transforms Children’s Playground Toys Into Large-Scale Explosive Sculptures

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NANCY RUBINS ‘Our Friend Fluid Metal’, 2014. Aluminum, stainless steel, 204 x 500 x 281 inches, (518.2 x 1.270 x 713.7 cm). © Nancy Rubins. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery. Photography by Robert McKeever.

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NANCY RUBINS ‘Our Friend Fluid Metal, Chunkus Majoris’, 2013. Aluminum and stainless steel, 150 x 192 x 145 inches, (381 x 487.7 x 368.3 cm). © Nancy Rubins. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery. Photography by Robert McKeever.

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NANCY RUBINS ‘Our Friend Fluid Metal, Paquito’, 2013 Aluminum and stainless steel, 132 x 168 x 96 inches, (335.3 x 426.7 x 243.8 cm). © Nancy Rubins. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery. Photography by Robert McKeever.

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NANCY RUBINS ‘Our Friend Fluid Metal, Spiral Ragusso’, 2013. Aluminum, stainless steel, 134 x 228 x 187 inches, (340.4 x 579.1 x 475 cm). © Nancy Rubins. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery. Photography by Robert McKeever.

Nancy Rubins‘ grandiose sculpture exhibition Our Friend Fluid Metal is open to public at the Gagosian Gallery, New York. Famous for her explosive installations featuring re-purposed objects, this time Rubins’ transforms old equipment from children’s playgrounds into dynamic large-scale floating structures.

The title of the exhibition refers to materials Rubins’ used to create her surrealist sculptures. The monumental figures are constructed from recycled aluminum playground toys. But the story goes back even further, as the playful critters (elephants, ponies, giraffes, etc.) were made with aluminum from WW2 military planes. Sturdy and, at that time, cheap material was perfect for making thick children’s playground equipment. For the artist, this flux was a natural inspiration.

“Even before the airplane parts the aluminum was a part of the earth and before it was part of the earth it was probably parts of stars and meteors and things that slammed into the earth.”

The exhibition consists of four massive sculptures, all compound through a system of steel trusses and tension cables. Dimensions vary, but the largest measures 17 x 42 x 24 feet. Despite that, Rubins’ works ten to evoke a sense of lightness and stillness, like someone had pushed a Pause button in the middle of an explosion. Her expressionist take towards unwieldy constructions reveals the fair line between rigid and gracefully fluid.

The exhibition runs until September 13, 2014 at Gagosian Gallery, New York.

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Otoniel Borda Garzón’s Tornado-Like Wood Sculptures

Otoniel Borda Garzón

Otoniel Borda Garzón

Otoniel Borda Garzón is known for his use of repurposed wood to create intricately twisted installations that dominate their gallery settings. The Bogota-born Garzón creates shapes which resemble naturally destructive environmental forms, those which upset life and cause death and destruction. The insinuations of hurricanes, tornadoes and twisters is amplified by the use of splintered wood, which recalls the damage after extreme weather conditions. However, his choice of using wood is important to these piece’s message. Just as the tree’s death gives humans and animals a material to work with, Garzón continues this cycle by using wood that has also ‘died’ or lost its purpose, creating a metaphor for the constant cycle of life and death and reinvention.

This series of installations, which the artist calls Reserva, involves site-specific construction and a reaction to each individual exhibition space. For the Bogota International Art Fair, Garzón built a 40 foot high tornado (pictured above and below). The installation, which took almost three weeks to build, with an additional week to disassemble, both reminds the viewer of the instabilities of destruction, but also the possibilities of life. (via colossal and behance)

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Aaron S. Moran’s Reclaimed Wood Sculptures

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Location is important to Canadian artist  Aaron S. Moran. The wood sculptures he creates are both inspired by, and dependent on pieces of wood that he finds in a particular area. From them, he assembles the discarded material into works of art. Using a variety of colors, textures, and patterns, he creates pieces that create a dialogue between place, media, and the viewer.

At times, his sculptures feel like they are going to combust. In his series If You Resist This! and Wash Up (Boundary Bay), wood is unevenly matched in color and size. Pieces are wedged, layered, and placed where they will fit. The non-matching feels almost haphazard, like the piece’s shelf life wasn’t supposed to be very long. This visual tension feels volatile, as if there is something is ticking inside them and about to burst.

At other times, Moran’s sculptures are more docile. They hold an entirely different air and attitude. Here, he uses wood that’s been painted colors of a pretty sunset. Moran has considered placement of colors and arranged the wood in patterns. He titled the series Kite Contest/1991, conjuring up the feelings you’d get from a warm, pleasant day. He writes this about the series, poetically stating, “Sun filtered nostalgia, memories of vibrant kites flying high in the sky along the shore of a beach. Lively patterns from days gone by, blurred by time. Sun bleached photographs of smiling faces. Picnic blankets and pinwheels moving in the warm breeze.”

Moran is currently pursuing his MFA with the University of Windsor in Windsor, Ontario, Canada. He lives along the Detroit River on the border of Canada and the United States. You can follow his works in progress and inspiration on his Tumblr, Year On A River.

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Landfill Harmonic And ‘The Recycled Orchestra’

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Landfill Harmonic- The world sends us garbage… We send back music. from Landfill Harmonic on Vimeo.

Recycling is a way of life in Cateura, Paraguay.  Many people there earn money by scouring the huge landfill for items that can be recycled.  A certain garbage picker, though, began recycling for much more than money: for the young people in his community.  Nicolás Gómez began creating instruments – violins, cellos, drums, guitars – from the trash he sifted through and gave them to local children.  The idea picked up steam and children’s orchestra known as “The Recycled Orchestra” came to life.  Landfill Harmonic, a documentary on Gómez and the orchestra, is slated to capture the inspirational story.  [via]

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