Designer Fashion Transformed Into Grotesque Consumerism Critique

Andrea Hasler sculpture5 Andrea Hasler sculpture3 consumerism

The artwork Andrea Hasler if nothing else is a critique of consumerism. Her Burdens of Excess series resemble the strange blend of designer fashion and a slaughterhouse.  Fleshy blobs bulge between straps and buttons nearly turning the high fashion accessories into bizarre creatures.  Zippers and stitching even begin to seem like biological features. Still, our “natural” biological sides as human is a jarring contrast to ideas as contrived as fashion, luxury, even money.

The press release from her recent show at Gusford Gallery in Los Angeles states:

“Hasler’s work focuses on constructions of identity and collective desires, and is characterized by a tension between attraction and repulsion. The works in the Desire series, in particular, focus on the obsession of projections of affluence and glamor. Reworking designer bags, shoes, and accessories into organ-resemblant sculptures, Hasler’s works engage with the psychological aspects of consumerism, blurring the lines between what you are and what you must have.

Through the transformation of GUSFORD’s Melrose Avenue gallery space into an indulgent, glamorous shop, Hasler’s installation embodies the epitome of luxurious excess, and looks to a dystopic future, where branded organs may one day be the ultimate fashion accessory.”

Watch a video of her installation at Gusford Gallery as well as a short interview with the artist after the jump.

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Taxidermy And Furniture Blend As Disturbing Comment On Consumer Culture

ARMIN BLASBICHLER design6 taxidermy ARMIN BLASBICHLER design4 taxidermy

ARMIN BLASBICHLER design9 taxidermy

Designer Armin Blasbichler‘s work is often jarring.  His series ORSON, I’m Home strikes a special chord, though.  The series is composed of three “dining sculptures” created primarily from the bodies of various farm animals.  While we may be more accustomed to farm animals adorning plates on the furniture, seeing them as taxidermy furniture makes for a surreal juxtaposition.  The furniture confronts its users with the consumption it usually facilitates.  Interestingly, for the series Blasbichler features a quote from professor and writer Don Slater: “In talking of modern society as a consumer culture, people are not referring simply to a particular pattern of needs and objects […] but to a culture of consumption.”
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Artist Collaborates With Bees to Cover Sculptures With Honeycomb

Aganetha Dyck sculpture2  honeycomb

Aganetha Dyck sculpture5

Aganetha Dyck sculpture1 honeycomb

You could say artist Aganetha Dyck creates her sculptures as much as she fascilitates them.  Dyck uses honeybees to decorate these figurines.  The bees create graceful lines and countours that seem compliment the existing shapes of the figures.  Their honeycomb patterns don’t seem like strange additions but rather enhancements.  Dyck begins her process with figurines, often broken or damaged in some way.  Then collaborating with beekeepers and scientists, bees are allowed to add their distinctive pattern to each small statue.  Dyck describes her process:

“To begin a collaborative project with the honeybees, I choose a slightly broken object or damaged material from a second hand market place. I choose damaged objects because honeybees are meticulous beings, they continuously mend anything around them and they do pay attention to detail. To encourage the honeybees to communicate, I strategically add wax or honey, propolis or hand-made honeycomb patterns to the objects prior to placing them into their hives. At least I like to think my methods are strategic. The honeybees often think otherwise and respond to what is placed within their hive in ways that make my mind reel.”

[via]

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Paper Art: Seven Artists Revamp Paper Into Sculptural Works

Tomas Saraceno paper art

Tomas Saraceno

Tomas Saraceno paper art

Tomas Saraceno

Tomas Saraceno paper art

Tomas Saraceno

Paper is a surface used by artists all the time, however we rarely see the true versatility of it as a material explored to the extent that is seen in the paper art featured here by: Ryuji NakamuraKyosuke Nishida and Brian LiJeff NishinakaTomas SaracenoMatt Shlian and Jen Stark.

Tomas Saraceno is a master of transforming a space and infusing it with an interactive surreal quality.  His installations that are constructed to provide viewers with the experience that they are walking on a cloud are absolutely captivating.  The soft dream-like magic of his work is more tactile and intimate, however, in this paper installation Cloud House featuring cloud like formations made only out of smaller geometric matte paper structures.

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Possibly The Most Meticulously Detailed Paper Art You’ve Ever Seen

Rogan Brown Paper artRogan Brown Paper art

Rogan Brown Paper art2

Paper art has especially blossomed in the past few years.  Few, perhaps none, are more meticulously detailed and worked the sculptures of Rogan Brown.  His pieces seem organic, as if grown rather than cut.  Their reflection of nature if further reflected in the medium, paper not far removed from trees.  He says of his sculptures:

“My work is an exploration and re-presentation of natural organic forms both mineral and vegetal. I look for patterns and repeated motifs that run through natural phenomena at different scales, from the microscopic to the macroscopic, from individual cells to large scale geological formations.” (via)

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Folded Magazine Margins Used To Create Abstract Sculpture

Gemis Luciani 8 Gemis Luciani 1

Artist Gemis Luciani takes the term ‘marginal’ literally in his art work.  His abstract compositions use regular magazines as a medium and material.  Luciani folds the pages of the magazines in a way to only expose the margins.  The simple method erases all text, layout and images.  He deconstructs the magazine making the marginal central.  Interestingly, the pieces often resemble a mix of minimalism and glitch art. His work walks the line of painting and sculpture.

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Giant Wooden Funnel Sculpture Made Of Reclaimed Wood

Patrick Renner installation1

Patrick Renner installation7 Patrick Renner installation6

This giant snaking sculpture is the Funnel Tunnel by artist Patrick Renner.  The temporary sculpture was commissioned by Art League Houston and sits on the esplanade across from their building.  Renner’s Funnel Tunnel stretches for 180 feet, open as a giant funnel at one end and tapering to a sharp point at the other.  The structure was created using steel and reclaimed wood.  The ALH explains, “the sculpture reflects the creative people and businesses in the Montrose area, and is the first of its kind in Houston.”   [via]

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Abstract Street Art Sculptures Hidden In The City

MOMO El Tono street art1MOMO El Tono street art3 MOMO El Tono street art7

Las fall street artists MOMO and El Tono were invited collaborate on a project for the Bien Urbain festival in France.  Both artists often work with an abstract painted style.  For their collaboration, though, the artists added a third dimension.  Using pieces of wood, the artists filled gaps in walls and windows throughout the city.  Instead of being unused negative space, the gaps were transformed into a framing device for these abstract compositions.  Simple but elegant, the series is illustrative of innovative trends in street on new approaches to interacting with the urban environment.

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