Mirror Shard Sculptures And Performance By Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen

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Superstition aside, these sculptures made from shards of mirrors were created by artist Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen.  If you look at the photographs carefully, in addition to the sculptures a person in a similar mirror-suit moves throughout the gallery.  The gallery also projects a video for this exhibit featuring  a person in this mirror-suit moving through commercial spaces in South East Asia and Denmark.  It is interesting noticing the virtually  universal nature of mannequins.  Rasmussen brings out that they allow us to imagine the way clothes will look on us, but on a deeper level we project what we want to be on them.  Similarly, these sculptures literally reflect those gazing at them.   [via]

Wyatt Kahn’s Clean And Simple Yet Geometrically Intricate Wall Sculpture

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Wyatt Kahn’s wall sculptures are built from a series of stretcher panels and raw canvas beautifully pieced together to make one collaged structure. The crevices and peeking back wall help create compositional depth, captivating the eye, revealing clean and simple, yet geometrically intricate work, which is devoted to the complex juxtaposition of space more so than color.

Of Kahn’s art, Sam Cornish writes, “Broadly the type of illusion Kahn employs is one that comes after the reduction of minimalist painting. The flat, object quality of each part is in one sense simply accepted. There is no hint of the surface being broken, of a window open to an atmospheric or light filled space beyond (however shallow).”

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Precariously Perched Concrete Blocks By Fabrice Le Nezet

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Artist and designer Fabrice Le Nezet‘s series Measure precariously positions concrete blocks.  Using metal tubing, Le Nezet supports the concrete in way that makes the industrial materials seem nearly organic.  The brightly colored pipes cling to the concrete like webs.  His intention with the work was to make the materials and its weight easily felt.  He says:

“I worked here on a physical representation of the idea of measure. The objective was to ‘materialize’ tension in a sense, to make the notions of weight, distance and angle palpable…This work lies in the context of my search for purification around raw materials such as concrete and metal. This is why I played with simple shapes which catch light and transcend the volume structure.”

Chinn Wang’s Screen Printed Wood Heraldry

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Chinn Wang creates an eye-catching brand of pop art.  Primarily working in screenprinting, she’s executed these piece directly on wood.  The work retains a charming flatness associated with screen printing while adding depth by printing on wood.  Her mix of new and old imagery and contrasting colors makes her art hard to pull away from.  Her Heraldry series is an excellent example.  Just as medieval heraldry made use of complex symbolism, Wang crests likewise make use of modern imagery.

Rhinestoned Fish And Painted Taxidermy

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The artwork of Cassandra Smith exists in the space between juxtapositions.  Taxidermied animals are often a bit creepy.  However, Smith’s stuffed forest friends are also playfully decorated – fish covered in rhinestones, and fur in bright paint.  The natural plays with the synthetic, old with the new, and utilitarian with the decorative.  She says of her work:

“My work  is about manipulations and transformation. It is about exploring the ways that I can enhance and change found objects to give them something they did not have in their former life.”  [via]

Modern Objects Made to Look Like 100 Year-Old Relics

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The work of artist Maico Akiba is almost a kind of future nostalgia.  Maico begins his work with commonplace objects such as electronics or clothing.  He alters the objects to appear as if they are 100 years old.  Rust and moss are taking over electronics while paint chips and peels away.  Although, the electronics look like relics, they are entirely functional.  Perhaps, this is how the future ruins of present day life will look.  They also serve as a comical type of existential reminder.

Classical Figures In Tucked And Pinched Foam

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These headless figures resemble ancient Venus statuettes.  However, the sculptures’ construction betray their modern origin.  Artist Etienne Gros pulls, tucks, and pins foam to resemble the classic nude.  The full curves and folds of the foam mimic human flesh in strangely similar manner.  Gros contrasts the age-old form with modern industrial material to highlight concerns that have never disappeared – the body, sensuality and sex.  Gros is familiar with the human figure beyond this unique medium. He’s explored themes of the classical figure in paint and even smoke.

Sculptural Portraits Made From The DNA Left On Your Trash

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Artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg‘s project, Stranger Visions, is a wonderful mix of science and art.  Dewey-Hagborg turns a poetic attention to the seemingly innocuous artifacts of life: a hair, chewed gum, a cigarette butt.  Beyond sight, though, the DNA remains of each unique person inhabits these “artifacts”.  She picks up these remains up throughout Brooklyn and brings them to a nearby biology lab.  Dewey-Hagborg extracts the DNA from the object, then information from the DNA.  She runs the information through a program she has written herself that is able to determine physical features such as eye color, hair color, gender, nose width, and so on.  That information is then exported to a 3D color printer to create a sculptural portrait of the unwitting donor.  [via]