Malia Jensen’s Sculptures Of Sensory Longing

Malia Jensen - Sculpture Malia Jensen - Sculpture

Malia Jensen - Sculpture

Malia Jensen juxtaposes deep sensory textures with completely opposite objects or animals to create a feeling of longing, sexuality, desire, or play. The pillow, tragically, will never be comfortable enough, born from cutting board wood. Likewise, the breast, shaped from a block of salt lick, will never be able to feel a tongue the way that it should. Each carefully chosen medium breathes a new heavy sadness into the life of these objects, condemned to mirror reality without all the glorious amenities or enjoyments.

Of her work, in ArtSlant Magazine, Jensen states, “You can seduce someone in, and they might be laughing for a while, but they realize this is somewhat dark. There’s a deep sadness in a lot of work. It’s like finding a human condition in an animal parallel.”

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A Digital Clock Made Up Of 288 Analog Clocks

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A million times (Time Dubai) by Humans since 1982 from Humans since 1982 on Vimeo.

A Million Times by the Stockholm based studio Humans Since 1982 beautifully mixes the analog and the digital.  The piece begins with the simple analog clock as its starting point.  288 clocks are arranged on the wall, their hands spinning to run through hypnotic patterns and display the time digitally.   Each of the 288 clocks’ two hands  run independently, powered by 576 individual motors.  The entire installation is connected to custom made software and operated from an iPad.  Watch the dials spin in the video after the jump.

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Paper Cut Figures from Giant Sheets Of Paper By Nahoko Kojima

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The intricate work of Nahoko Kojima is created from single painstakingly cut sheets of paper.  For example, her newest sculpture, Byaku, is cut from a single giant sheet of Japanese washi paper.  Using a simple X-Acto knife like scalpel Kojima tirelessly works to pull the image out of the paper.  In order to maintain precision, she is said to change her blades about once every three minutes.  Kojima’s multilayered work also inhabitants a playful space between 2D and 3D.  At times her work is framed like a painting while other times presented like a sculpture.    [via]

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Honoring The 1980s With Sacred Geometry

West-Space_01Amy Joy Watson - Sculpture Amy Joy Watson - Sculpture

There is something fantastically unworldly yet alluringly familiar about Amy Joy Watson’s bright sculptures. Whether it’s a drooping bow or a glitter-filled orb, this Australian’s artful structures feel like a 1986 birthday party, translated or abstracted by a video game of that same era: there are no soft edges, only the disjointed illusion of it.

To make each piece, Watson stitches or glues together watercolor-stained balsa wood, occasionally adding a tasteful Gobstopper here, or helium balloon there, to garnish her own primal sense of whimsy and sacred geometry, resulting in a somewhat spiritual monument to another imaginative age and time.

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Mutant Heroes and Villains – Sculptures by Takahiro Komuro

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The sculptures of artist Takahiro Komuro feel conspicuously out of place in the real world. They nearly seemed to have been plucked from the video games, cartoons, and comics of a twenty-somthing’s childhood.  Mutant superheros and villains, video game bosses, the often dramatic story lines of each perhaps reflected the anxieties of our parents at the time.  Komuro’s sculptures capture this strange balance of youth and play on the one hand and deeper fears on the other.

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New Hyperrealistic Sculptures from Ron Mueck

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As the Fondation Cartier points out, ‘a Ron Mueck exhibition is a rare event.”  His hyperrealistic sculptures are worked over carefully for countless hours.  Thus new work is especially exciting.  Mueck’s current exhibit at the Fondation Cartier introduces three new sculptures.  Couple Under an Umbrella, featured here, illustrates Mueck’s style well.  His amazingly lifelike sculptures are only betrayed as inanimate objects by their surreal size.  The giant couple beside their creator makes for a bewildering sense of scale and reality.  [via]

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Mike Leavitt’s Famous Artist Action Figures

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Mike Leavitt’s Intuition Kitchen churns out a plethora of playful and multidimensional pieces. From portable homeless shelters to wedding cake toppers and DIY vending machines, his career in the creative world knows no boundaries and ignores all stigmas. He just grabs inspiration and goes for it. For instance, Leavitt pays homage to Christo by shaping his image from polymer clay, a staple at Michaels or any craft supply store. This, and other Art Army Action Figures, embrace a lovely contrast between materials and content in an loveable and pitch perfect manner. It’s not just cheap plastics imported from overseas factories, nor is it about elitism in the commercial art world, nor is it a rebellion against any of it. Each art star figurine is simply built from hand in a limited edition of 10 with a raw passion and appreciation for the entire spectrum.

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Chandeliers Made from Bike Sprockets Hang Under an Overpass

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Ballroom Luminoso is a wonderfully different kind of ballroom.  A series of six chandeliers by artists Joe O’Connell and Blessing Hancock hang under an overpass in San Antonio, Texas.  The chandeliers are constructed from recycled bicycle parts, structural steel, and custom LED fixtures.  Shadow patterns of bicycle sprockets paint the surrounding area alongside colorful light.  Accompanying the bicycle parts are carefully carved imagery referencing the areas Hispanic, agricultural, and ecological heritage.  The artist statement goes on to say:

“The medallions are a play on the iconography of La Loteria, which has become a touchstone of Hispanic culture. Utilizing traditional tropes like La Escalera (the Ladder), La Rosa (the Rose), and La Sandía (the Watermelon), the piece alludes to the neighborhood’s farming roots and horticultural achievements.”    [via]

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