Carly Fischer’s Litter Replicas Made From Paper and Glue

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The installations of Carly Fisher may at first appear to be trash strewn galleries.  However, closer inspection reveals that none of the items are actual garbage.  Rather, Fisher carefully recreates litter from little more than paper and glue.  The meticulous attention she  gives to sculpting trash replicas, so to say, may seem odd.  However, the familiar international name brands dotting the gallery floor raise the question: do these corporations possibly give the same meticulous attention to the branding of litter as Fischer?  As one of her gallery statements puts it, “Perhaps there is a marketing edge to trash?”

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The Ultra-Realistic Paper Sculptures of Vincent Tomczyk

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At first glance the work of Vincent Tomczyk appears to be normal ready-made objects.  However, each piece is carefully constructed almost entirely from different types of paper.  Yeah, paper.  You can’t sit on these chairs or slip into those shorts without ripping it.  In a way, this seems to be Tomczyk’s intention.  Tomczyk and his viewers investigate these objects by painstakingly rebuilding them without their utilitarian properties.  He says:

“Although my work can be categorized as realism, my intention is to distill the emotion of an object, then through expression, reconstruct it into my view of its essential self – free of function.” [via]

 

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Eric Franklin’s Glowing Glass Skull Sculptures

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Eric Franklin‘s sculpture’s glow with a certain life.  Though the series focuses on skulls and skeletons, it isn’t exactly dead.  These skulls are carefully made of flameworked glass, or glass melted and shaped with a torch.  The hollow skulls are then filled with ionized neon, krypton, and mercury gases.  The ionized gases cause the skulls to glow from within complimenting their eery shape.   [via]

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Wolfgang Stiller’s Human Matchsticks

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Wolfgang Stiller‘s series Matchstickmen are a depiction of people that are literally burnt out.  The sculptures resemble giant match sticks, the the charred match head like a human head, ignited and tossed about the gallery.  A play on the phrase ‘burnt out’, the series comments on the unending demand of human labor.  Interestingly the installation was created while the German artist was living in China.  However, Stiller says of the work:

“I don’t want to see it only as a critique on the Chinese system. Any other system in the world has the same problem. Big companies exploit their employees to make larger profits, all over the world. As long as we have affordable T-shirts or sneakers, we don’t really want to know whether they are made by children in India or not.”  [via]

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The Tiny or Giant Sculptures of Petros Chrisostomou

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It’s difficult to gauge scale in the work of Petros Chrisostomou.  The giant shoes seem so detailed; the galleries look immaculate.  If you want to know I’ll spoil it for you…it’s the galleries that are tiny.  Chrisostomou uses small mundane objects as the center of his photographs.  He places these in the middle of amazingly detailed miniature galleries.  Chrisostomou painstakingly gives attention to lighting, scale, perspective, and detail.  The realism of his sets force the eye and mind to alternate between small and large scales, doubting each in the process.

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Wang Zin Won’s Praying Machines

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The figures of Korean artist Wang Zi Won seem above all peaceful.  His statues are also machines that perform prayers.  He mixes Buddhist imagery with autobiographical depictions to illustrate a futuristic mix of technology and spirituality.  It is interesting that Wang’s sculpture’s abandon the physical body – in a sense something Buddhism and visions of the future share in common.  Indeed, his vision of the future seems to be a bit of an optimistic one.  That is, one in which further harmony between man and machine leads to a more complete existence and identity.    [via]

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Do Ho Suh’s ‘Infinitely’ Repeating Sculpture

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Korean artist Do Ho Suh has often explored thoughts on collective strength (and perhaps weakness) in his work before.  However, his new sculpture Karma addresses a more personal collectivity.  This enormous sculpture seems to stretch on perpetually.  At the sculpture’s base a man stands with his eyes covered by another man crouching on his back.  That man’s eyes are also covered by another man crouching on his back and this pattern appears to repeat ad infinitum.  Perhaps a literal visual interpretation of the concept of karma or even the saying ‘history is doomed to repeat itself’.

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Pinched, Pulled And Crumpled Wood Sculptures From Cha Jong-Rye

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The work of Korean artist Cha Jong-Rye looks like anything but wood.  Her large pieces hang on the wall as if they were draped cloth, strange liquids, and geological formations.  Her peculiar choice of medium undoubtedly references these and other ideas of nature and the home.  She painstakingly carves her work from wood, often from hundreds of small pieces.  She seems to crumple, pinch, and pull a material that’s especially rigid, typically found as a tree or house.  They’re temptingly tactile – if no one in the gallery noticed I’d nearly be enticed to drag my fingers across their surface. [via]

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