Noumeda Carbone’s Sculptures Made of Pills

Italian-based artist Noubeda Carbone is known typically for her award-winning illustrations.  Her sculptures, however, are similarly colorful and meticulous.  The Disease Sculptures and Wearable Pills series each include pieces painstakingly crafted from pill capsules.  While her 3D work may exude a technicolor lightheartedness, the medium itself is disquieting.  Particularly in the Wearable Pills series, the modern shift from pharmaceuticals as medical items to vanity products is especially striking.  Carbone may be highlighting the visually pleasant nature of the pills as it’s connected to the dream of personal transformation.

Lottery Ticket Art from Ghost of a Dream

The work of art collective Ghost of a Dream uses lottery tickets and romance novel covers to mezmerizing effect.  Often employing thousands of dollars worth of scratch-off tickets ($70,000 worth of tickets in the last installation alone), the work conjures a culture of hyper-materialism.  The gaudy coloring of the tickets and cheap imagery of romance novels reflect the nature of the object they cover.  Like the dream of striking it rich, the art of the collective is hypnotic and absorbing.

If you want to see more work from Ghost of a Dream be sure to check out their exclusive feature interview in Beautiful/Decay Book 9.  The collective explores Greed in this Seven Deadly Sins themed edition.

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Yarisal and Kublitz Bring Humor To The Banal

The art duo of Yarisal and Kublitz create smartly charming sculptures and installations.  The pieces, often created from household materials, are each emboided with a subtle subversiveness.  From a vending machine filled with glassware to self filling and popping balloons, the duo’s pieces transform familiar objects into characters of ironic scenes.  Through their work, Ronnie Yarisal and Katja Kublitz encourage a fresh perspective of the banal through sculptures that look like the punchline to existential jokes.

Victorine Müller Performing Inside Her Sculptures

At times called ‘performative sculpture’ Swiss artist Victorine Müller combines sculpture and performance art to intriguing effect.  Her large but airy PVC sculptures stand ghost-like, glowing in the light and disappearing in the shadows.  Müller herself sits or stands peacefully inside the sculpture.  The title of her most recent exhibit “Wild at Heart” sheds some light onto her work.  Müller temporarily inhabits the inside of an animal – the guts, the heart, the womb, the soul.  Though simple, each performance connects easily with the viewers communicating, as Müller says “something that is not said and cannot be said, but that is.”

Salão Coboi’s High Fashion Monsters

The 9 Worthies is a series of sculptures produced by art project Salão Coboi.  Each sculpture highlights pieces from the autumn/winter 2012 fashion collections…as worn by polymer resin monsters.  The creatures model clothing from brands and designers such as Maison Martin Margiela, Jil Sander, Raf Simons, ACNE and Paul Smith.  Sculpted, hand painted and signed by Salão Coboi, each piece is part of an edition of twenty.

Salão Coboi (Portuguese for Cowboy Salon) is the personal project of artist Apolinário Pereira.  Originally, the project began as a “collective that was born in 2009 two days after Michael Jackson’s death in the European Wild West (Portugal)”.  Pereira now operates Salão Coboi as a solo project.

Qie Zhijie’s Oil Barrel Dragon And Tree Sculptures

Chinese artist Qie Zhijie is known for working in mediums as diverse as calligraphy to performance art.  Much of his work, though, is tied together by a subtle mischievousness.  These two sculptures constructed by Qie, Oil Can Dragon and Cash Cow, are no exception.  Both sculptures are entirely built from skillfully cut oil barrels.  Considering the dragon and the tree are both symbols strongly tied to the natural world it’s clear Qie’s choice of using oil barrels wasn’t a trivial one.  In Cash Cow, an imposing tree of six stacked oil barrels, Qie contrasts birds perching on boughs and cut from metal lids with an airplane high its branches.

Loren Schwerd’s Sculptures Made Out of Hair

Sculptor Loren Schwerd documents the wreckage hurricane Katrina left behind by building artwork from it in her series Mourning Portrait.  While in New Orleans shortly after the storm Schwerd came upon the flooded St. Claude Beauty Supply shop, much of its inventory spilling out on to the sidewalk.  She uses the human hair extension she picked up off the curb to build what she calls “commemorative objects”.  Each piece is a “portrait” of a building in various stages of deterioration.  The images of dilapidated homes give an indication of the massive amounts of damage from the storm while the hair alludes to the human loss. Schwerd explains her use of the human hair extensions in her work this way:

“The portraits draw on the nineteenth-century tradition of hairwork, in which family members or artisans would fashion the hair of the deceased into intricate jewelry and other objects as symbols of death and rebirth and remembrance.”

Georgia Dickie’s Found Object Sculptures

Georgia Dickie makes sculptures by assembling found objects, most of them large, heavy, and industrial. They seem to be as much about object culture as they are about form and clutter. Unlike some of her contemporaries like Daniel Eatock who focus on common and found objects by turning them into funny absurdities, Dickie’s abstractions of objects are more serious explorations of the objects shapes and uses. But with object culture inevitably comes clutter culture, which Dickie acknowledges in her installation which resembles the back of an old man’s garage. Already in the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art at the age of 23, she has a big future waiting for her. Keep your eyes peeled! More sculptures after the jump.