Self Portraits Portray Amusing Ways To Break The 10 Commandments

"Honor Your Father and Mother"

“Honor Your Father and Mother”

"You Shall Not Take the Lord's Name in Vain"

“You Shall Not Take the Lord’s Name in Vain”

"You Shall Have No Other Gods Before Me"

“You Shall Have No Other Gods Before Me”

“Keep The Sabbath Day Holy”

“Keep The Sabbath Day Holy”

How many Commandments have you broken? New York City-based photographer Anna Friemoth has gone against all 10 of them with her witty series of self portraits entitled 10 Commandments. With each image, Friemonth turns gluttony, adultery, stealing, and more into a conceptual interpretation of the offense. She styles herself against a dark gray background, adding props that bring each idea to life.

With Commandments like “Keep The Sabbath Day Holy” and “Honor Your Father And Mother,” it’s pretty common to not follow these. We see that for “You Shall Not Kill,” Friemonth is about to devour a bird,  and for “You Shall Not Take The Lord’s Name in Vain,” she’s had a specially-made balloon that says “GOD DAMN.” The fine details in each portrait make this series amusing; they also point out that depending on how much of a stickler you are, you could easily break any one of these rules. (Via Flavorwire)

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Jaimie Warren’s Playful Pop Culture Selfies Subvert The Form’s Perceived Vanity

Self-portrait as Pretzel Rod Stewart

Self-portrait as Pretzel Rod Stewart

Self-portrait as Lasagna Del Rey

Self-portrait as Lasagna Del Rey

Self-portrait as woman in Les Demoiselles d'Avignon by Pablo Picasso

Self-portrait as woman in Les Demoiselles d’Avignon by Pablo Picasso

Self-portrait as Yoda in L'admiration by William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Self-portrait as Yoda in L’admiration by William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Selfies are a ubiquitous mode of self-expression. Photographer and performance artist Jaimie Warren integrates pop culture. humor, and a bright color palette to create visually striking self-portraits that are absurd, humorous, and campy. In one photo series, Warren becomes celebrity-food characters, fusing their names into an offbeat expression. In another, she re-creates images from art history, embellishing them with her signature pop culture camp style. Warren’s selfies subvert the form of traditional portraiture by using absurdity and grotesqueness to supplant the selfie’s identification with vanity. In addition to her individual projects, Warren also co-directs an internationally touring “faux-cable access show” called Whoop Dee Doo, a nonprofit that partners with youth organizations to introduce kids to wonderfully strange art that is meaningful, fun, and compelling. (via la monda and vice)

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Google’s Robot Cameras Caught Taking Unintentional Selfies In Museums And Galleries

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In 2011, Google launched Art Project in order to provide comprehensive, virtual tours of the spaces and artifacts of the world’s art museums and galleries. This requires Google’s robotic camera trolleys to roam museums taking 360 degree panoramic shots of every room they’re documenting. Since May, Barcelona-based artist Mario Santamaría has been collecting striking images of these cameras’ mirror selfies via a Tumblr page. In some of the images, the cameras don silvery-white blankets – this effect, combined with our culture’s immersion in selfies, renders these cameras almost familiar and comfortable, but startling in its reflection of itself and selfie culture. These museums and galleries are, for the most part, emptied of people, the camera eerily alone in its self-documentation. (via booooooom)

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Rachel Graves Transforms Catcalls And Harassment Into Powerful Photo Series

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In a powerful series by artist and curator Rachel Graves, she interprets the catcalls and street harassment that’s thrown at her and her friends when in public places. Menagerie is a collection of self portraits that liken this lewd and unwanted treatment to the way that animals are prey.

“The project came about as a way for me to take control of what was happening and find a way to answer back and gain ownership over myself again,” Graves explained to The Huffington Post. “For me it was important to do more than simply dress up and paint my face to represent some of the names and insults being thrown at me. I didn’t want to just turn myself into the object that the harassers saw me as. I wanted to find a way to get my sense of self back, to be able to throw the words away and take back control.”

 “Bird,” “fox,” and “bitch,” are all references to animals (and ones that women are called) that dehumanize people, and are all costumes that Graves wears. She paints ghoulish-looking makeup and fashions snouts that reflect the identity of what she is to her taunters. Afterwards, she washes herself of these oppressive masks.

“Being a woman in a public space can be a scary thing. Some men perceive women’s bodies as being public property, and act in ways that are intimidating and sexually aggressive. When I experience street harassment, my autonomy and control over my own body is taken away from me,” Graves says, again to The Huffington Post. “A similar thing can be seen in the industrialization of farming practices. Animals and women are objectified in similar ways: seen merely as pieces of meat for public consumption.”

By washing away the paint and taking off the noses, Graves regains her own identity. (via The Huffington Post)

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Eloy Morales’ Masked Self Portraits Are Actually Hyper Realistic Paintings

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It is almost difficult to believe that these self-portraits by Spanish Eloy Morales are oil paintings.  His oil painting are generally executed on large panels such as the one above.  Morales carefully blends colors and layers to flawlessly recreate his portraits.  He nearly seems to consider each painting a separate test of his abilities.  Morales is known to write notes prior to a painting of goals to meet that he felt weren’t met on a previous work.  However, there is more to his work then a simple recreation of a photorgaph.  Morales explains in Poets and Artists Magazine:

“I am interested in working on reality through the use of pictorial codes, previously understanding that it is a false relation and I always keep in mind that painting is an independent expression. Finding a meeting point that truly represents my vision keeps me going on painting.” [via ignant]

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Surreal Self-Portraits Of Travel And Transcendence

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Alicia Savage captures her life with a surreal twist that pushes beyond the static point and shoot. From absurd flights of fancy to soft reflective moments, each self-portrait conveys an independent sense of travel or transcendence: movement that emphasizes the importance of dreaming in relation to personal exploration and documentation. Conceptually, it’s that simple– but technically, it’s a little more challenging. Her exquisite use of color, light, setting, and digital manipulation curiously compels us to enter these departures with great anticipation.

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Colorful Pixels Integrated Into Unique Portrait Photography by Ashihiko Myoshi

 

Cool photographs from Akihiko Myoshi. The photographer is captured in a mirror as bars of color, meant to evoke pixels, are positioned in the frame. A nice commentary on personal identity in the Digital Age. But the coolest thing about this series is Myoshi’s process:

The photographs included here are of mirrors, paper and tape often adhered to the surface of the mirror taken with a large format camera as they attempt to unpack the structural mechanics of photographic representation.

Originally a computer engineering PhD candidate, Myoshi now makes art and teaches at Reed College. (via)

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Philip Akkerman’s Widely Varied Self-Portraits

 

Dutch painter Philip Akkerman has 200 or more self-portraits on his website. They are extremely varied stylistically but almost always share a really unsettling vibe that’s hard to articulate. In the paintings, Akkerman is usually glaring; eyebrows and lips turned downward. What’s most intriguing in these works is Akkerman’s evolution over time. He’s experimented with myriad different styles and techniques and grown as a painter, and his various transformations are all laid out in these works. Not his glare, though. That’s remained somewhat of a constant. (via)

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