Japan’s Sapporo Snow Festival Is The World’s Largest Winter Wonderland

Sapporo Snow Festival

Sapporo Snow Festival

Sapporo Snow Festival

sapporo Snowman_Festival 11

Every winter, nearly two million people from all around the world venture to Sapporo, on the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido, to celebrate all things winter for one week at the Sapporo Snow Festival. The festival, which has its roots from when the city hosted the Winter Olympics in 1972, has been taking place since the early 1980′s. From enormous buildings, temples and slides to more intricately detailed and finely-sculpted statues, the city’s streets are full of all types of snow and ice works to celebrate the natural beauty of the winter season.

Now the festival draws sculptors and competitors from all around the world for its famous annual competitions, taking place in several different sites around the city. The event has set several World Records, including the audience-participatory construction of the most snowmen ever made in one place (over 10,000 – a record which still stands). The next installment, now the 65th Sapporo Snow Festival, will be held this February 5th through 11th in 2014. (via weirdtwist)

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Polar Vortex- Andy Goldsworthy’s Ice and Snow Sculptures

Andy Goldsworthy, Touching north, North Pole (1989)goldsworthyIcicles1_op_592x600 goldsworthy-ice_ball_21999_3goldsworthy

Although most of America (currently enduring one of the worst winter cold snaps in nearly two decades) would like to ignore this fact in for favor of bundled layers and heated blankets, sometimes even the dire cold, snow and ice can provide the tools and inspiration for those who brave it’s elements.  Famed land and installation artist Andy Goldsworthy (previously here and here) has often utilized ice, frost, snow and frozen earth to create his trademark land interventions. And rather than avoiding the elements, Goldsworthy is only able to create these delicate and precise sculptures by embracing the cold.

In Goldsworthy’s 2004 documentary, Rivers & Tides, several scenes document the difficulty in attempting to harness the cold’s elements. One scene shows the artist, braving the winter elements for hours at a time in finger-less gloves (so as to be able to properly feel and hold the materials) fusing together icicle chunks together with warm water, holding them in place while they freeze together into naturally-made though unnatural shapes. The smallest temperature changes, light, and even chance cause the ice sculpture to collapse, repeatedly, which is all part of Goldsworthy’s process. Says the artist, “Movement, change, light, growth and decay are the lifeblood of nature, the energies that  I try to tap through my work. I need the shock of touch, the resistance of place, materials and weather, the earth as my source. Nature is in a state of change and that change is the key to understanding. I want my art to be sensitive and alert to changes in material, season and weather. Each work grows, stays, decays. Process and decay are implicit. Transience in my work reflects what I find in nature.”

Goldsworthy’s process is only captured through the use of photographs, and the often detailed notes (below) which the artist uses to document the difficulties and triumphs of each individual piece.

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Simon Beck Incredible Drawings Created Using His Feet And Miles Of Snow

Snow Installation

snow drawing

snow drawing

Simon Beck - Snow Installation

Simon Beck’s geometric landscape artwork doesn’t require much more than a good snowfall, careful planning, and a lot of patience. To produce his works, the artist treks through miles of snow, patterning his walk carefully to create large scale designs. The results of his efforts can best be viewed aerially, as they cross acres of land. Conveniently, he’s installed some of his work under ski lifts and across valleys, where they can dazzle passersby.

Beck’s work is reminiscent of a Tibetan Sand Mandala, which too requires hours of work (his snow patterns take 8 to 10 hours to complete), has ritualistic movements, and whose existence is fleeting. Both will eventually be destroyed, as it is inherent and built into the ritual. But, while the breakdown of a mandala is ritualistic, Beck’s snow murals are at the whim of mother nature. (Via Huffington Post)

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A Hotel And Art Gallery Built Entirely Of Snow And Ice

Icehotel architecture

Icehotel architecture

Icehotel architecture

Every winter about 125 miles North of the Arctic Circle a hotel is built entirely out of snow and ice.  While definitely a unique hotel, ICEHOTEL, as it’s called, is just as much an art project in its own right.  In a way the structure is contemporary interpretation of traditional homes built of the same material.  However, each year brings an entirely new design to the hotel.  In addition to being filled with guest rooms and a bar, the art and design group at ICEHOTEL also work from a handpicked group of artists.  The hotel becomes a temporary home to art and people, to be destroyed and rebuilt next year. [via]

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Michael Zimmerer’s Disappearing Horizon

Photographer Michael Zimmerer‘s series White Horizon captures a Midwest white-out.  Zimmerer’s stark images capture a landscape shortly after a snow storm in which the horizon seems to disappear.  Even the sun is lost in the sky.  The expansive fields of white are interrupted by the dark shapes of buffalo, river, rock, or trees.  A nearly abstract quality is lent to the photographs more often seen on the canvas.  However, the subject matter – the untouched snow, clear rivers, wild animals – also seems to emphasize the absence of the human hand and its loneliness.

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Max Hamilton

maxhamilton-store-12

Max Hamilton is a photographer based in London. He has a knack for photographing cultures and their beauty – from skateboarding to the industrialization of China. His shots create an honest narrative that resonates beyond a simple, timely image; his work is a testament to this era.

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