Music Makes Paint Splatter Dance

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Photographer Martin Klimas‘ series “What Does Music Look Like?” is a fun attempt at answering that very question.  He uses paint as a vehicle for sound.  Klimas places brightly colored paints on a surface that sits just above a speaker.  Playing loud music such as Kraftwerk or Miles Davis makes the paint splatter above the speaker  with the vibrations making it “dance”.  The paint jumps and splattes while being captured by the camera.  Klimas snapped approximately 1,000 photographs to capture the set.

Jelly That Makes Electronic Sounds

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NOISY JELLY from Raphaël Pluvinage on Vimeo.

Designer Raphaël Pluvinage has designed an innovative way for you to play two things you were taught not to: food and electricity.  His prototype “game” is appropriately named Noisy Jelly.  ”Players” first mold jelly using various provided molds and colors.  The jelly is then placed on a board that is connected to a computer.  Touching the jelly produces a fun array of sounds.  Different tones are produced depending on the size and shape of the jelly, the salt content of each mold (determined by the color), as well as where and how the jelly is touched.  Check out the video to hear the noisy jelly.

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Patterns Of Sound Visualized In Sand

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YouTube user brusspup blends science, illusion, and art into double-take inducing videos. Sand is used to create amazing patterns that are called Chladni figures.  Brusspup pours sand on a metal plate that is connected to a speaker and tone generator.  Various frequencies create different patterns of sand on the plate, higher frequencies creating more complex figures.  Different portions of the plate do not vibrate with each frequency.  The sand naturally accumulates in these areas of no frequency, creating a visualization of the sound traveling the metal plate.   [via]

Daniel Palacios’ Visualized Sound Waves

Artist Daniel Palacios‘ sculpture nearly seems alive.  A length of rope is attached at to a machine at each end and spun.  The spinning rope creates waves against a black backdrop, which are also audible as the rope cuts through the air.  Visitors entering the gallery and their movement then influence the rope’s wave.  The more a visitor moves in front of the installation, the more chaotic the wave pattern.  It’s interesting to note a visitors surprise or sudden discomfort upon realizing their influence on the wave.  The sculpture not only reveals a viewers impact on sonic surroundings, but also concretely presents also seems to eerily acknowledge each viewers existence in space and movement.

Sara Naim’s Photographs Of Sound

Wondering what sound looks like? So did Sara Naim when she set off to translate sound into photographic images. The result is a body of work titled Beethoven – Moonlight Sonata. In Sara’s series, Ludwig Van Beethoven’s symphony vibrates through milk.

Beethoven composed this piece in the early 1800’s for his blind pupil and lover, Giuletta Gucciardi. Gucciardi said to Beethoven that she wished she could see the moonlight. Beethoven then composed a piece about the moonlight’s reflection off Austria’s Lake Lucerne, called Moonlight Sonata.

More images of this series after the jump.

Interview: Jeff Eisenberg

Jeff Eisenberg

Jeff Eisenberg creates almost Rorschach-like images that hover somewhere between structural vector flights of futuristic fancy and strange biomorphic organisms. Conducted on multiple layers of mylar, they could almost be strange architectural blueprints for a sci-fi movie. He also works in the less common medium of sound installation. All inspired by automatic-writing creative exercises, the works have a strange, abstracted linguistic impulse. Read the full interview detailing Jeff’s studio practice, sources of inspiration and his unique brainstorming process.