Artist Interview: Jered Sprecher’s Hybrid Worl/k/d

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Jered Sprecher says something about painting.  As Sprecher speaks, just underneath my skin, the blood starts dancing.  Pulsing its ruby hips along to a great horn section, a mildly panicked Bossa Nova heartbeat.  This is circa 2001, and Jered is a year or two ahead of me at the college we were at, and he was thoughtful about painting.  He thought about the surface, and he thought about abstraction.  He thought about what painting meant to other people.  On the other hand, my education was from the school of immaturity, famous for using the word vomit and bad jokes in poor taste.   I learned from him, and began to look seriously at paintings as more than an image.  Today, Jered’s paintings are even stronger evidence of his thoughtfulness and clarity of vision.

Sprecher’s new paintings combine abstraction with imagery.  Some of the images are based on variations of a single photograph of three pigeons or doves.  When painting, Sprecher worked on some of the pieces with a process of moving from top left to bottom right, the same method a dot matrix printer uses, and other paintings used a more intuitive method of layering paint.  The human, the machine, the image, and the abstraction live together in this wor/k/ld.

Jered Sprecher has a solo show, Half Moon Maker, at Steven Zevitas Gallery in Boston.  The show is up until May 10th, 2014.  All photos courtesy of Steven Zevitas Gallery.  Below you can find an interview with Jered about his newest paintings.

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Alex Lukas’ Man Made Violence And Quietude

Alex LukasRecent Works show at Steven Zevitas Gallery (April 19th-June 2nd 2012) in Boston consists of five new large-scale paintings on paper (the largest measures at twelve feet in length) and a group of work utilizing appropriated book pages. This body of work continues the Lukas’ exploration of our current cultural condition through the lens of the landscape. Executed primarily in ink, acrylic, watercolor and gouache, the artist also uses the process of silk-screening for certain elements of each work.
Thomas Cole’s well-known painting “River in the Catskills,” which depicts a pastoral landscape with a small train slicing through the scene in the middle ground, is a harbinger of things to come in the story of man’s attempt to gain control of nature. In many ways, Lukas’ landscapes, which combine sites real and imagined – with a healthy nod towards Hollywood and art history – tell the end of the story, as man-made structures yield back to nature. The works pivot on series of dichotomies: violence and quietude; the man made and the natural; hope and a profound sense of despair. They also grapple with ideas about national morality and societal fragility.

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