Adrian Esparza Transforms Mexican Serape Blankets Into Intricate Geometric Thread Installations

esparzathread12

esparzathread17

esparzathread5

 

Adrian Esparza

Texas-based artist Adrian Esparza uses nails and the thread from Mexican sarape blankets to weave colorful geometric patterns. Growing up in El Paso, Esparza encountered these blankets on a daily basis. Using his background as a painter, Esparza observed that the blankets contained painterly qualities that he sought to deconstruct. The result is an unraveling of a Mexican cultural symbol into a new form, a multi-dimensional landscape of color and shape. Esparza’s deconstruction and transformation of this cultural symbol reflects the displacement of identity that many Mexican-Americans experience as a result of migration. The wall pieces Esparza constructs from the serapes, though completely transformed, recall macrame and other handcrafts from the artist’s culture. Through his work, Esparza reinvents the ordinary and asks the viewer to embrace the potential for creative transformation that can be found in the familiar and the mundane.

Esparza’s work – titled “Wake and Wonder” –  will be on view at Pérez Art Museum Miami as part of the exhibition, “Americana: Formalizing Craft,” until May 2015.(via design boom)

Read More >


Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

You Won’t Believe The Stunning Portraits Kumi Yamashita Creates Out Of Nails And Thread

portraits-made-from-single-thread-wrapped-around-nails-kumi-yamashita-1 portraits-made-from-single-thread-wrapped-around-nails-kumi-yamashita-3 portraits-made-from-single-thread-wrapped-around-nails-kumi-yamashita-11

You might remember Kumi Yamashita from one of our October posts featuring her extraordinary collection of works with light and shadow. If you recall, Yamashita subtly manipulated materials such as paper, fabric and wood to strategically use lighting on them in order to create shadow art installations. Her imagination and impressive craft skills lead her to create this new ongoing series entitled Constellation (a title that references the Greek tradition of tracing mythical figures in the sky).

This body of work consists of three materials: a wooden panel painted a solid white, thousands of small galvanized nails, and a single, unbroken, common sewing thread. She creates these stunning portraits by using the single,unbroken thread wrapped around thousands of nails. The task at hand is laborious, but the result is well worth the work.

The Japanese artist’s piece from this collection, Mana (an 40h x 30w cm portrait of her niece), was recently selected as one of 50 finalists for the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition, a triennial event being held at the Smithsonian Museum’s National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. Yamashita’s artwork was selected from over 3,000 entries and is on display at the National Portrait Gallery until February 23, 2014. (via Twisted Sifter)

Read More >


Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Amanda McCavour’s Hanging Thread Illustrations Created From Soluble Fabric

Amanda McCavour
Amanda McCavour Amanda McCavour
Amanda McCavour creates delicate and intricate thread illustration-sculptures by sewing into a fabric that dissolves in water. This method allows her to build a threaded structure that stays in place once the fabric dissolves. The result is embroidery that appears fragile, on the verge of unraveling. She recreates domestic scenery, like that of chairs, side tables, electric sockets, in addition to other figures such as hands, a garden, and a steam pump. The effect of this work is ephemeral and whimsical.
From her artist statement, “I am interested in the vulnerability of thread, its ability to unravel, and its strength when it is sewn together.  I am interested in the connections between process and materials and the way that they relate to images and spaces.  Tracing actions and environments through a process of repetition, translation and dissolving, I hope to trace absence.  My work is a process of making as a way of tracing and preserving things that are gone, or slowly falling apart.”  (via slow art day)

Currently Trending

Susanna Bauer Threads And Weaves Over Small Natural Objects

bauermixedmedia11 bauermixedmedia2 bauermixedmedia10

“Most of my pieces are small sculptural objects often based on found natural materials. I like giving time to the inconspicuous things that surround us and often go unnoticed, paying attention to small details and the tactile quality of objects. Appropriating traditional craft techniques like weaving and crochet as a means of sculpture brings a contemplative element to the development of my work. I am interested in unusual combinations of materials, the experimentation with fragility and strength and the individual stories that evolve and shape themselves in the process of making.” – Susanna Bauer

Read More >


Currently Trending

Alessandro Lupi’s Blacklight Bodies

Alessandro Lupi sculpture4 Alessandro Lupi sculpture1

Alessandro Lupi sculpture3

Artist Alessandro Lupi seems to capture ghosts in his eerie sculptures.  Lupi begins with simple thread to create his artwork.  He paints each strand one at a time with fluorescent paint.  The threads are then arranged and lit with black lights.  Lupi often arranges the thread in the form of a figure – a person that at once seems to inhabit a space and in the process of disappearing.  He calls his work ‘Fluorescent Densities’.  The designation alludes to the way he uses his medium to “investigate” and play with light and space.

Read More >


Currently Trending

David Ogle’s Ultraviolet Thread Installations

David Ogle installation3 David Ogle installation4

David Ogle‘s installations seem to glow right out of the space they effeminate from.  His work is mainly constructed with thread illuminated ultraviolet light.  However, Ogle’s installations are not only built of the thread, but the space they emphasize and the light itself.  Underscoring this Ogle says:

” Much of my work to date has dealt with exploring notions of materiality, of permanence and of the perception of objects in space. Using light as a sculptural medium, my work is innately ephemeral.”

If you like David Ogle’s work be sure to check out the work of JeongMoon Choi.

Read More >


Currently Trending

JeongMoon Choi’s Glowing 3D Threadwork

Korean artist JeongMoon Choi uses surprisingly simple materials to create installations that appear to be pulled off the computer screen.  Simply using thread and UV lights JeongMoon illuminates complex geometric patterns.  The arranged thread patterns glow against the dark space at times resembling three dimensional plans.  Her installations explore the gallery space, both literally and conceptually.  Glowing angles bounce off walls and ceilings  emphasizing an architectural space that typically tries to not attract notice.

Read More >


Currently Trending

The Laser-Like Thread Installations of Sebastien Preschoux

These photographs depict the carefully constructed installations of artist Sebastien Preschoux.  Preschoux installs his work on location – both in urban and forested settings.  He constructs intricate structures of thread that beam from and through the surroundings.  Through careful lighting, the pieces resemble lasers scanning the area, or giant spider webs strung across branches.  The mathemetical precision of Preschoux’s work contrasts with the unpredictable natural settings they fill.

Read More >


Currently Trending