Henriëtte van ’t Hoog’s Geometric Trompe L’oeil Installations

Henriëtte van’t Hoog’ - Trompe L’oeil

Henriëtte van’t Hoog’ -  Trompe L’oeil Installation

Henriëtte van’t Hoog’ -  Trompe L’oeil Installation

Henriëtte van’t Hoog’ - Installation

Dutch artist Henriëtte van ’t Hoog’s installations look 3D, but are completely flat. She uses trompe l’oeil to give her work depth, designing space in a way so that our eye is fooled. To do so, she uses geometry and specifically placed and angled shapes, sometimes building out of the wall to create more complex structures. In an interview with Visual Discrepancies, van ’t Hoog describes why she makes her work. Not surprisingly, her explanation is light-hearted. She states:

…I have been poking around for a while hoping to make people aware of color and shape, and of non-existing space. In Joint I [above] transformed a little area into something new and unexpected, joking around with color and shape while not knowing where it would lead – just having fun, and working through ways that would perhaps mislead the audience.

van ’t Hoog’s color palette is light and very colorful, at times sickeningly so. She regularly uses day glo yellow and hot pinks, which vibrate against one another in industrial spaces and white walls of a gallery. Her installations are based on believability, meaning they must be precise; She paints crisp lines and plans the angles of extra walls and surfaces so that her work appears 3D at all viewpoints. Even though there is a lot of planning involved, van ’t Hoog wants to make it look effortless. It’s important to her that the viewer see something unexpected. Later with Visual Discrepancies, she says:

…I hope when people step inside this small space and see the play with the flat and the three-dimensional, the play with the perspective and the triangular objects and how a painted piece of paper is disturbing their expectation, together with the strength of the color, that their experience will hit the roof.

Sharon Moody’s Photorealist Comic Book Paintings

Sharon Moody’s gorgeously painted trompe l’oeil paintings of comic books freeze the page turning excitement of comic books and build suspense for what super heroic feats will take place with the advancement of each page.

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Overunder Wheatpastes Graffiti Or Does he Graffiti Wheatpastes?

At first glance I thought these clever byomorphic and hybrid characters by Overunder were painted directly on the wall but upon closer inspection I realized that these pieces were painted in the artists studio with spray paint on paper and then cut out as giant posters. Although this isn’t a completely unique idea Overunder does a great job of creating a Trompe-l’œil effect with this technique giving his pieces a spontaneous feel while still being labored over and well planned in the comfort of his studio. I’ve posted some images of his work in a gallery setting after the jump so you can see how they are cut.

Anthony Sneed

From far away, Anthony Sneed’s unique brand of Minimalism instantly calls to mind the reductive elegance of Dan Flavin–or the boisterous, hypercolor modernism of Sol Lewitt’s recent work. However, on closer inspection, Sneed’s seeming hard edged “paintings” reveal themselves to be three-dimensional scultpural works; Modern tromp l’oeils of sorts. Sneed’s work amalgamates the conceptual framework of the Minimalist tradition with Op Art’s investigation of the relationship between illusion and picture plane, movement and depth, reality and perception. In this sense, Sneed’s work calls to mind Tony Smith’s geometrical modules, in his capacity to create drama through simplicity, scale, and revealing what is not there.

till rabus

Till Rabus’ combines sex, slick trompe-l’œil paint slinging, and the occasional hamburger to create a wide variety of work that goes from surrealism to narrative painting.

RANDALL ROSENTHAL’s Solid Wood

Nope this isn’t all the subscription money i’ve been stuffing in my mattress for the last ten years. Rather it’s a trompe l’oeil sculpture by Randall Rosenthal. Each sculpture is hand carved from a single block of wood and then painstakingly painted for months. See more of Randall’s amazingly realistic wood sculptures after the jump.

Pavlos Tsakonas’s Technicolor Trompe-L’œil

Pavlos Tsakonas creates hyperrealistic trompe-l’oeil paintings that confuse and delight the eye all at once. Each piece is a technical marvel with real shadows juxtaposed next to artificial ones to create a 4th dimension of creative awesomeness!