Illustrating With Words: Luke Lucas’ Typography

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You may have already seen Luke Lucas’ typography work, but weren’t aware of it; he’s created designs for companies like Target, Nestlé, The New York Times, and Barnes & Noble. He’s also done work for exhibitions and creates his own fonts. Some of the more humorous and elaborate text designs are reminiscent of Wayne White’s word paintings. Of his work, Lucas writes, “I love that the same word, passage or even letter can be treated in bunch of different ways and embody entirely different meanings… That and through subtleties like a slight shift in line weight, the elongation of a tail or the arc you use, a letter can go from contemporary to traditional or happy to sad in a single stroke…”

Preview: Steve Powers Solo Show At Joshua Liner

 

That good stuff right here.

Ice Man, beauti-loser, and love letter scribe Steve Powers is hitting NYC’s Joshua Liner Gallery with a solo show on September 6th. You can expect some pretty tasty typography and graphics from the artist this go-round. The show is entitled  A Word is Worth A Thousand Pictures and is definitely one to check out in person. The works on display range from 10-x-8 in. to 10-x-10 feet, and include Powers’ “Metaltations”- spontaneous enamel works on aluminum. And if you can’t make it over to Chelsea before September 29th, check out a preview of the show below.

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Bratislav Milenkovic’s Typographic Illustrations

Serbian designer Bratislav Milenkovic’s imagery sits at the intersection of typography and illustration usually combining the two to create cleaver and playful images. Morre Typography fun after the jump.

Twan van Keulen’s Typography Set made from Cut Leaves

 

We still have a month left of summer, but autumn will be here before we know it. And that means leaves. Everywhere. Here’s a cool little typography project to help ease the transition from season to season. Twan van Keulen is a graphic designer from the Netherlands. In a series called Falling Leaves, Van Keulen cut letters and symbols out of leaves and scanned the results, effectively creating a unique (well, it is kinda based off Helvetica) set of typography.  (via)

The Art Nouveau Sensibilities of Jugend Magazine

 

We’re not in the habit of sharing stuff that’s not contemporary here, but sometimes you come along something that shouldn’t be overlooked, as it seems relevant no matter when it was created, and could use a little more attention. Jugendstil, the German Art Nouveau movement, was named after the late nineteenth century literary magazine Jugend, which promoted the aesthetic within its pages and on its covers. If you’re looking for some fresh typography/design/illustration inspiration, check out this online resource, which contains lots of images from and info on the magazine. There’s even some Impressionistic stuff mixed with the Art Nouveau goodness, but it all comes off as really fresh. I wonder what Jugend, which didn’t make it out of World War II and Nazism, would be like if it were around today.

BEAUTIFUL/DECAY X ROYAL TALENS Amsterdam Trip PT. 1

I’m happy to present second installment of photographs from our amazing European trip with our friends over at Royal Talens And Canson. If you remember we started our trip in Paris and made our way over to Amsterdam, stopping along the way to check out all the museums, galleries, and sights that each city offered.

We started our first day in Amsterdam with a boat tour of the canals to get acquainted with the many tiny streets and canals that zig zag throughout the city. Along the way we saw many amazing examples of dutch architecture, design, street art and of course Houseboats!

Studio Patten’s Typographic Illustrations

Madrid based design studio Patten pushes typography and playful layout to the forefront of all their work regardless of whether they are creating bold digital illustrations that jump off the page or delicately drawn fashion illustrations by hand.

Barry McGee At Prism Los Angeles

If you’re in the Los Angeles area you still have time to check out Barry McGee’s show up at Prism until June 30th. As usual with all of McGee’s shows his latest offering features dynamic installations that cover every corner of Prism’s massive gallery space. With this new body of work you’ll notice a greater transition towards the abstract and patterning with only moments of his signature graffiti references and typography. Could this be signs of an evolution out of the street iconography that McGee built his career on? I doubt it but the new evolution is quite nice nonetheless.