Hikaru Cho’s Painted Surreal Body Manipulations Will Make You Do A Double Take

Hikaru Cho
  Hikaru Cho

Hikaru Cho

Hikaru Cho

Hikaru Cho‘s method of painting could best be described as a physical and unconventional type of doodling. Cho primarily uses acrylic paints on bodies or food to create believably 3D surrealistic effects, and even transfers this skill to stop-motion film and other video work. Her work alters our perspective of seemingly stable universal concepts, creating new forms that demand our engagement using only the special effects rendered through paint.

Rosa Verloop’s Eerie Nylon Sculptures Of The Human Form

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Rosa Verloop creates sculptures out of nylons. Eerie and captivating these malleable forms capture the density and lumpiness of a fleshy existence. They’re soft and cuddly and evoke a tangibility. These malformed sculptures speak to bodily fear and vulnerability and what we perceive as normal and abnormal. Nylons are supposed to cover skin, creating a smoothness that Verloop undermines by twisting and stuffing these nylons into bulky lumps.

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Plus-size Painting: Abstractions Created With Massive Unconventional Paint Brushes

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Fabienne Verdier paints with unconventionally large tools. She creates her own brushes, made from substances like sheep hair, duck down, or horse hair, sometimes reaching 6 feet long and over 150 pounds. The brushes are suspended with rope, and then handled physically, or with the help of a pair of bicycle handlebars. Trained under a Chinese painting tradition, Verdier frequently uses black to create her paintings, but will often transgress this tradition by using bright, earthy colors. Preparing ascetically before each piece and practicing the art of spontaneous expression form the basis of her work.