Alex Roulette’s Uncanny And Nostalgic Paintings Of The Suburbs

Alex Roulette - Oil on Board Alex Roulette - Oil on Board Alex Roulette - Oil on Board

To be a visual artist is to also be a researcher. It is observing, questioning, and ultimately drawing conclusions that are reflected in a body of work. Not surprisingly, Alex Roulette begins new series with research. He gathers a large collection of source materials, including found images like vintage postcards. He photographs environments. They are all incorporated in his landscape paintings, which explore a place that is quasi-nostalgic for many of us – the suburbs.  Roulette’s hazy, dream-like atmospheres allow us to  draw upon our own memories and remember a time when things maybe weren’t so complicated.

Roulette’s paintings are of quiet moments. He’s depicted silent meetings, teenage hijinks, stormy nights, and more. They are meticulously detailed and his technique is reminiscent of Old Master paintings from the 16th and 17th centuries. While this type of rendering is not the most innovative approach to painting, Roulette’s obvious skill and talent for crafting a narrative make it hard to take your eyes off these paintings.

The longer you look, more details present themselves. You begin to question the intent of them, guiding your mind beyond what is painted. Where does the road in Crossroads (directly above) lead? What is down in that lake? Furthermore, what is inside the colorful structure in Backdrop (below)? We are supposed to ask these questions. Roulette wants us to find these images subtly uncanny. It’s not just in those strange details, but in our vantage point. He’s composed the compositions in a way that makes us the voyeur. We spy on a woman from a motel as she sits in a parking lot. Our view of swimmers is obstructed by plants, like we are seeing something shouldn’t be. It feels exciting and a bit strange.

Art Installations That Reveal Private Erotic Inclinations

Kristian Burford - Installation

Kristian Burford - Installation

Kristian Burford - Installation

Kristian Burford’s art installations meditate on the postmortem state of sexual arousal without a partner present. Nestled in a messy realistic setting, each carefully constructed wax figure seems to sigh inward, recollecting him or herself after an erotic whim has been satiated. However, the intention does not stop there: it seethes and penetrates with primal implications. Encountering each diorama, our own interior worlds are challenged and heightened as we find ourselves cast to confront not so much nudity, but even more so, our own erotic inclinations as possible voyeurs.

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Dan Gluibizzi’s Voyeuristic Watercolors

Dan Gluibizzi’s work combines voyeurism with soft wash watercolor, creating pieces that feel like you’re looking in on strangers lives from a distance. He uses images from the internet, sometimes amateur porn photos but recreates his pieces in a completely refreshing manner. Viewing his work is nothing like viewing the photos they came from, he adds a sense of curiosity and innocence in his figures that comes through beautifully in his medium.