Arnaud Lajeunie Dyes The Color Of Ocean Waves In His Mesmerizing Photographs

arnaudlajeunie13arnaudlajeunie1 arnaudlajeunie3 arnaudlajeunie12

Often in our daily lives, something needs to be taken out of it’s normal context to be seen with renewed appreciation. In Arnaud Lajeunie‘s recent photoseries  Water meets colour, colour meets water, the Paris-based photographer explores new waves of seeing the constant ebb and flow of ocean waves by making them more visible, through the use of biodegradable, sugar-based dyes. Arnaud’s interventions tint the surging water with a plethora of colors, which are captured using an extremely fast shutter speed, which produces photos of violent, colorful takes of traditional landscape photography. Taken out of a normal context, one can see more clearly the natural beauty and fury. Says Arnaud, “Here, colour is seen as a raw material, as are the waves and the rocks. Colour adds density and thickness to transparent water, thus enhancing the flux fixation process.”

As writer Eugenia Lapteva notes in an essay on the series, Colours of Absence, “As the colours bleed into the sea, the texture of the water thickens and the motion of the waves is (re)defined, revealing its hidden course and complex networks. The crashing waves, which are carefully contained within the camera frame, pull the viewer into a vortex of frozen shapes and novel configurations that are otherwise indiscernible to the human eye.”

In his own words, the photographer explains, “I rely on the camera as a device with technical features that can give tangible shapes to ever-moving fluxes, in this case the waves. The high shutter speed transcends the human reflex of persistence of vision: it reveals existing shapes that the ‘mortal eye’ cannot perceive on its own.” (via mymodernmet)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Terrifying Barbie Tidal Wave Composed Of 5,000 Dolls

annette-thas-builds-a-giant-wave-wave-of-barbie-dolls-designboom-02annette-thas-builds-a-giant-wave-wave-of-barbie-dolls-designboom-04annette-thas-builds-a-giant-wave-wave-of-barbie-dolls-designboom-01annette-thas-builds-a-giant-wave-wave-of-barbie-dolls-designboom-05

For the artist Annette Thas, Barbie is a disturbingly bittersweet symbol of childhood nostalgia and longing; for installation piece “Wave I,” she uses between 3,000 and 5,000 barbie dolls to build a sculptural wave, re-appropriating the doll as a means of translating her earliest memories, scenes which now flood her after returning to Belgium to care for her ill sister. Her sister’s illness, she explains, was related to the childhood they shared, one that was marked in part by the death of her brother.

For the artist, the wave is meant to convey her own relationship to overwhelming memories; it is 4 meters wide and stands at 3 meters tall, forcing viewers to be encased completely within its depths. The piece seems to swell with cascading blond hair, forever caught at the terrifying moment before its breaking. Adding to its realism, Thas chose to exhibit it on the beach as part of 2014’s Sculpture by the Sea amidst the sounds and smells of real waves.

The barbies in the piece, wild hair tangled and stripped of their clothing, do indeed seem ominous, but they are also startlingly sympathetic. They are second-hand toys, once loved but eventually discarded. They have endured a sort of violence, having been scarred by knives and bite marks. Each one has a poignant narrative all her own; one doll simply bears the words “please love me” on her chest. The plastic toys, symbolic of the scores of children who once owned them, are somehow lonesome now, robbed of childhood’s affections. Their demanding presence is urgent and desperate, their blue eyed faces pressing us to remember both the magical and painful bits of our youths. (via Design Boom)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Amazing Waves – Sine Wave Animation by Daniel Sierra

Daniel Sierra animation1 Daniel Sierra animation3

Oscillate is the MFA thesis project of digital artist Daniel Sierra.  The animation begins with a simple rolling sine wave.  However, things quickly get complex.  The waves fling dust, begin to smoke, and seem to catch fire.  The waves multiply and mutate.  Oscillate is an impressive animation by any standard, especially considering it is a school project (albeit an MFA thesis project).  Also, you’ll notice the credits are especially short.  While such animations typically have a staff of several, Sierra animated and composed the music entirely on his own.  [via]

Currently Trending